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Man Arrested for Hurling Suspicious Object at White House

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A man was arrested after he was spotted throwing a suspicious object at the White House, the New York Daily News reports.

The suspect was arrested soon after he threw the object over the White House’s north fence line at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday.

A closer examination found that the object was “not a dangerous item,” a Secret Service spokesman said.

No one was injured.

Opinion: Border Buildup Along Canadian Border Is Excessive

Tom Dennis
Grand Forks Herald

Helping local law enforcement is all well and good.

But that’s not why the United States beefed up the Border Patrol along the Canadian border to 10 times its pre-Sept. 11 size, an expansion.

Instead, that expansion from Maine to Washington was done for one and only one reason — the same reason why people now need passports to cross the border; the same reason why trade between the two countries remains impaired.

The reason was to better prevent terrorists from crossing the border.

How goes that struggle?

That’s the question Americans should be asking, because lots of money is being spent and manpower is being deployed based on what Washington thinks is the answer.

To read more click here.

Report: Just 3% of Drug Defendants in Federal Cases Chose Trial Over Guilty Plea

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A tiny fraction of drug defendants in federal cases chose to go to trial instead of pleading guilty.

A new report from Human Rights Watch indicates that just 3% of defendants charged with drugs choose to go to trial, the Huffington Post reports.

The reason: The excessive penalties for drugs, according to the report.

“Prosecutors can say, ‘Take these 10 years or, if you get a trial and are convicted, you’re going to look at life,’” said Fellner, an attorney who specializes in criminal justice issues at Human Rights Watch. “That’s a pretty amazing power that unfortunately they are more than willing to wield.”

In effect, defendants feel forced to plead guilty in plea agreements to avoid lengthy prison sentence, whether they’re guilty or not.

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ATF Agent Blasts Handling of Botched ‘Fast and Furious’


Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

John Dodson said he’s barely hanging onto his job.

The ATF agent blew the whistle on the botched gun trafficking scheme, “Fast and Furious,” and is the author of “The Unarmed Truth: My Fight to Blow the Whistle And Expose Fast and Furious.”

Dodson said not enough people were held accountable.

“Nobody’s ever explained where this started from, who thought this was a good idea, and how no one’s been held accountable for it.”

For more on his story, click on the video above.

Case of the “Badly Beaten Bank Robber”

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

This wasn’t your typical bank robber. 

The young man with a busted lip, facial bruises and a swollen eye walked into a Houston Bank wearing no disguises. He pulled out a pistol and demanded money, the Houston Chronicle reports.

The robber escaped with an undisclosed amount of cash. 

Investigators have dubbed him the “Badly Beaten Bank Robber,” the Chronicle wrote.

Supreme Court Case Pits Protesters’ Rights to Be Heard Against Politicians

The Daily Astoria 
Editorial

Can political protests be restricted so that political leaders don’t have to listen?

This is one way of framing the issue before the U.S. Supreme Court when it considers this term whether Secret Service agents were right in ordering protesters to be removed from President George W. Bush’s sight and hearing during a 2004 visit to Jacksonville in southern Oregon.

The other main way to view the matter is whether the Secret Service has unquestionable discretion to ensure the president’s safety by keeping obvious opponents much farther away than they keep obvious supporters.

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit – the second-highest level of federal court – was seriously split on this question in a decision released in February. A majority of the 28 judges ruled that a lawsuit can proceed against the agents who required protesters to be moved more than twice as far away from the president than supporters. The Obama administration, supporting the agents, asked Supreme Court justices to consider quashing the lawsuit.

To read more click here.

Justice Department Tackles Wrongful Convictions by Demanding More Investigative Scrutiny

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Justice Department officials are combating wrongful convictions by demanding that law enforcement agencies to a better job scrutinizing eyewitness accounts and police interviews, Medill News Service reports.

It’s impossible to know for sure how many people are wrongfully convicted, but more than 1,100 have been exonerated from 1989 to 2012, according to the National Registry of Exoneration.

The report, issued Tuesday, also calls for investigative reforms to prevent wrongful arrests, the news service wrote.

“At minimum, law enforcement agencies should record audio of all interviews involving major crimes,” the report reads.

Fugitive Drug Lord Complains That U.S. Is Causing ‘Infernal Nightmare’ for His Family

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A fugitive drug lord accused in the 1985 kidnapping and murder of DEA agent  Enrique Camarenais complaining that the U.S. is causing an “infernal nightmare” for his loved ones, McClatchy reports.

Rafael Caro Quintero, who was released from on Aug. 8 prison early on procedural grounds, is appealing to Mexico’s president for help.

Thing is, Quintero is a wanted man in Mexico. Mexico’s Supreme Court reinstated his conviction on Nov. 6.

Now the U.S. is offering a $5 million bounty for his arrest and conviction, McClatchy reported.

Quintero argues in a letter to President Enrique Pena Niet and other government officials that he has been punished enough.

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