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FBI Combats Computer Hackers with Cyber Crimes Task Force in Louisville

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The alarming increase in computer attacks has prompted the FBI to create a cyber crimes task force in Louisville, WDRB.com reports.

To combat the sophistication, the FBI is recruiting computer-savvy people.

“There’s a changing in the F.B.I. for sure,” said Michael Russo Jr., a Supervisory Special Agent with the F.B.I.

Russo said cyber attacks are a big threat and can result in people having their identities stolen within seconds.

“We are hiring special agents, computer scientists and I.T. forensic examiners,” Russo said.

It’s not easy. The FBI received more than 20,000 applications for traditional investigator positions but far fewer people expressed interest in FBI tech jobs.

 

Former Baseball Star Chipper Jones Claimed Sandy Hook Shooting Was a Hoax

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The horrific Sandy Hook school shooting that killed 20 children and six staff members was a hoax?

So claimed former Atlanta Braves star Chipper Jones in an odd tweet that suggested the FBI confirmed the shooting was not real, Huffington Post reports.

The next day, on Saturday, Jones apologized, saying he misunderstood what happened.

“My apologies for my Sandy Hook tweet yest. I had heard something from someone which I thought to be credible and tweeted w/out researching.

He added: “It was irresponsible of me to do that and will not happen again. Please accept my heartfelt apology to those who were hurt or offended.”

Weekend Series on Crime History: Mobster Frank Lucas, an Organized Crime Heroin Dealer

httpv://youtu.be/j1l2DBExXsk

Illinois Issues Medical Marijuana Licenses without FBI Background Check

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Illinois Gov. Bruce Rauner surprised many people this week when he issued licenses to 70 medical marijuana businesses before they would have to undergo criminal background checks as required by state law, The Associated Press reports.

Rauner said he began issuing the licenses because patients shouldn’t have to wait any longer following the mishandling of the licensing process under former Gov. Pat Quinn.

Once the FBI authorizes the use of its criminal history checks, Rauner said the businesses that have been issued licenses would still be subjected to the background checks.

Illinois’ medical marijuana law excludes anyone with a violent crime or drug felony.

 

Border Patrol Agent Opens Fire on Car After Driver Tries to Run Him Over

istock photo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Border Patrol agent opened fire on a car in Texas after the driver tried to run him over Thursday night during a surveillance sting, ValleyCentral.com reports.

Border Patrol agents approached two suspects while conducting surveillance in McAllen. When the federal agents identified themselves, authorities said the car tried to run over one of the agents.

An agent fired a weapon at the car and apprehended the passenger.

The driver managed to flee.

More information about the incident is expected to be released today.

Flyer of Drone That Crashed at White House May Be Charged Because of Washington Law

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

When it comes to drones, it’s safe to say that law enforcement has looked the other way on many occasions.

Not this time.

A man accused of operating a drone that crash landed at the White House last week may be charged for violating national defense airspace, CNN reports.

The flyer, Shawn Usman, said he was trying to fly the drone just outside of his friend’s apartment when it inexplicably took off took the White House.

“Many of the public reports of his actions with respect to this incident are inaccurate,” his attorney Jim Garland said in a statement. “He has cooperated fully with the Secret Service’s investigation and looks forward to putting this unfortunate episode behind him.”

Federal law prohibits the flying of drones in Washington.

Federal investigators are trying to determine whether charges are warranted.

Is Law Enforcement Crossing Line by Taking Photos of Drivers, Passengers?

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A license-plate scanning system designed to combat drug trafficking and other crimes has raised serious privacy questions because of the technology’s ability to snap photographs of drivers and their passengers, the ACLU said, reports Bloomberg.

The concern is that authorities will combine the photographs with facial-recognition software.

“This adds a whole other dimension to what is already a very significant surveillance infrastructure,” Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst for the ACLU, said in an interview. “Facial recognition software holds the potential to super charge this kind of system. We haven’t seen anything like a nationwide systematic infrastructure snapping photographs of Americans as they go about their lives, and this is what this appears it can turn into.”

Records obtained by the ACLU found that the license-plate database had more than 343 million records.

“An automatic license plate reader cannot distinguish between people transporting illegal guns and those transporting legal guns, or no guns at all; it only documents the presence of any car driving to the event,” the ACLU said in a blog post last month. “Mere attendance at a gun show, it appeared, would have been enough to have one’s presence noted in a DEA database.”

Other Stories of Interest


Suburban Detroit Man Accused of Threatening to Behead NYPD Officer

Alvaro Eduardo Guzman-Telles via Facebook

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A suburban Detroit man with Asperger’s syndrome faces up to five years in prison after the FBI said he threatened on Facebook to behead a New York police officer who placed Eric Garner, an unarmed black man, in a fatal chokehold, the Detroit News reports.

Alvaro Eduardo Guzman-Telles also is accused off posting on Facebook that people should kill police officers.

“Kill all cops on sight. No matter the circumstances,” Guzman-Telles is accused of writing.

The NYPD’s police union wanted to “convey our deepest appreciation to (the FBI) for following up and making an arrest in a case of a threat against one of our officers.”

His dad said the threats were empty and just an expression of his free speech rights.

“It’s just words. He was venting,” his father told The News. “It is symbolic language. That does not mean he was going to do that.”