Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

June 2021
S M T W T F S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



News Story

Washington Times: Is Robert Mueller on a Fishing Expedition

Robert Mueller

Robert Mueller

By Editorial Board
Washington Times

Robert Mueller is nothing if not relentless. Impatient with a fishing expedition that relies on slippery prey to swim into his net, the special counsel now dreams of besieging anyone at the White House who has so much as watched an episode of a television drama about Soviet spies in Washington. Scalps have to be taken because that’s what special counsels, i.e., special prosecutors, do.

Mr. Mueller was commissioned to investigate the Trump campaign’s ties, if any, to Russians. That investigation seems to be what drillers looking for oil call “a dry hole.” Mr. Mueller has so far spent millions, giving employment to every lawyer in town without a client, and he has to come up with something, and soon. That’s why his investigation is ranging so far afield.

Foreign meddling in American elections, by the Russians or anyone else, is seriously grave business. Mr. Mueller has focused his guns on one of Donald Trump’s early campaign managers, Paul Manafort. No one, despite several investigations, has yet demonstrated that there is anything on Mr. Trump himself. Mr. Mueller sent his agents to raid Mr. Manafort’s home in Alexandria, in suburban Virginia, before dawn, reminiscent of an episode of “Cops.” A forensic team spent 10 hours extracting every shred of evidence of wrongdoing, collecting everything from grocery receipts to tax records, looking for something, anything, to prove the president was in cahoots with Vladimir Putin to save the world from Hillary Clinton.

Mr. Mueller could have collected the “evidence,” such as it might be, by subpoenaing any and all documents. This might have deprived a grand jury of a dramatic search for the big ham sandwich which prosecutors traditionally use to get an indictment when the prosecution doesn’t have anything else. Mr. Mueller, according to several press accounts, has told Mr. Manafort that he will be indicted. He’s apparently still looking for a crime.

To read more click here.

DOJ Trying to Force Facebook to Reveal Names Associated with Anti-Trump Event

computer-photo1By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Justice Department is trying to force Facebook to disclose the names of everyone who interacted with an event page about an anti-Donald Trump rally during the presidential inauguration.

If the social media giant complies with warrants issued by the DOJ, the federal government would receive the Facebook accounts of everyone who “liked” the disruptj20 page and signed up to attend the protest, Gizmodo reports

The ACLU says the Justice Department’s warrants are a violation of the First and Fourth amendments.

“What is particularly chilling about these warrants is that anti-administration political activists are going to have their political associations and views scrutinized by the very administration they are protesting,” ACLU attorney Scott Michelman told CNN.

Facebook said it plans to fight the warrant.

Judge: Details on How FBI Hacked into IPhone Are Public Information

courtroomBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI does not have to publicly reveal how it hacked into an iPhone used by one of the San Bernardino, Calif., terrorists in an attack that killed 14 people, a federal judge has ruled.

On Saturday, U.S. District Court Judge Tanya Chutkan ruled against three media outlets that sued the FBI to reveal the mystery behind the hacking, Politico reports. 

Chutkan also ruled that the FBI does not have to reveal the cost or the company it hired to breaking into the phone.

At a news conference last year, then-FBI Director James Comey suggested that the cost to hire the company would exceed his salary for the remainder of his term – about $1.4 million.

Mueller Hides from Spotlight to Avoid Leaks in Russia-Trump Probe

Robert Mueller, via FBI

Robert Mueller, via FBI

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Special counsel Robert Mueller has slinked into the shadows to avoid the media and others as he embarks on one of the most high-profile investigations in decades.

Politico reports that Mueller has stayed out of the public spotlight, often interviewing people in a conference room in his Washington D.C. office, a location that is a closely guarded secret. 

Mueller was appointed to investigate suspected collusion between Trump’s campaign and Russian operatives.

Politico wrote:

Militant about leaks, the former FBI director swears participants to a secrecy that they have honored to a remarkable degree. Reporters have long considered him among Washington’s toughest nuts to crack: “You’d be embarrassed to ask Bob Mueller for a leak,” said the veteran journalist Steven Brill, who has written extensively about media coverage of special counsels. “It’d be like asking him to watch a porn movie with you.”

Occasionally a savvy Washingtonian scores a chance sighting. When public relations professional Eddie Gonzalez saw the Russia investigator walking alone near Capitol Hill on a mid-September weekday afternoon, he suppressed an instinct to chase Mueller down for a selfie, he said. But a hotel restaurant worker did score a picture with him this spring, which her son posted on Twitter. Mueller grinned for that photo, slightly. But when a CNN crew chased him down a Senate hallway in June — “The president thinks it’s a ‘witch hunt.’ Is there any way you can respond to that?” — the poker-faced G-man just stared ahead and kept walking.

The moment illustrated the strange dynamic of Mueller’s mission. He is leading a highly secretive investigation into a president who publicly criticizes the probe on a regular basis. It also underscored what former colleagues, fellow prosecutors and people close to the investigation call Mueller’s calculated effort, in the face of a president who has contemplated his firing, to make himself as small a part of the story as possible.

Weekend Series on Crime History: Nixon Vs. Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox

DEA Agents Wearing Protective Gear to Avoid Fentanyl Exposure

About 30,000 pills laced with fentanyl were discovered by the DEA. Photo via DEA.

About 30,000 pills laced with fentanyl were discovered by the DEA. Photo via DEA.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The ever-growing opioid crisis that claims thousands of lives a year also is becoming increasingly dangerous for law enforcement agencies, including the DEA.

More police and DEA agents are becoming hospitalized because of exposure to fentanyl, a deadly synthetic opioid that is many times stronger than heroin.

NBC New York reports that law enforcement is relying more protective gear than ever to avoid exposure.

“Whereas heroin can kill you in milligrams, fentanyl can kill you in micrograms,” said Gary Tuggle, the Drug Enforcement Administration’s agent-in-charge for Philadelphia.

The DEA has responded by increasing safety protocols that require agents to wear bulletproof vests, a breathing apparatus and fully enclosed suits.

“What you’re seeing here is the Level A suit, which is the highest level,” DEA Special Agent Pat Trainor said.

Other Stories of Interest

Special Counsel Mueller Loses Another FBI Official in Russia Probe

Robert Mueller

Robert Mueller

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Special counsel Robert Mueller’s team of lawyers and investigators who are investing Russia’s meddling in the presidential election has lost a second FBI official.

ABC News reports that FBI veteran Lisa Page has returned to the office of the FBI’s general counsel. 

One source said Page had been expected to work for Mueller only temporarily and  return to the general counsel.

Several weeks ago, “the investigator dream team,” as Wired magazine called it, lost one of the top FBI officials on the team, Peter Strzok. It was unclear why he stepped down. He has joined the FBI’s human resources division.    

Trump Conspicuously Absent from Ceremony to Install New FBI Director

Christopher Wray is sworn in as the new FBI director. Photo via FBI.

Christopher Wray is sworn in as the new FBI director. Photo via FBI.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump was a no-show while Chris Wray was officially installed as the new FBI director during a ceremony in a courtyard at FBI headquarters Thursday.

Wray, a former federal prosecutor, was appointed by Trump after firing then-FBI Director James Comey, who also did not attend. Neither did special counsel Robert Mueller.

White House officials said Trump wanted to stay away from the ceremony because of the ongoing Russia investigation.

“Our mission is simple but profound — to protect the American people and uphold the Constitution. That mission hasn’t changed, and it won’t change — not as long as I have anything to say about it,” Wray said at the ceremony.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions praised Wray as “brilliant, hardworking and an American patriot.