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U.S. Citizen Shot Dead After Shootout at Border with CBP Officers

Border marker at San Ysidro Port of Entry, via Border Patrol.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Customs and Border Protection officers engaged in a deadly shootout Monday evening with a U.S. citizen who opened fire after refusing to stop at a checkpoint at California’s border with Mexico.

The 23-year-old man who refused to stop his white pickup truck was killed after opening fire on CBP officers. The shooting began after the pickup truck was blocked by another vehicle.

“The suspect began firing a gun out of his vehicle toward the officers, then exited his vehicle and continued firing at the officers,” San Diego police Lt. Matt Dobbs told The Daily Mail on Tuesday. “The officers returned fire, striking the suspect.”

The shootout occurred about 7:30 p.m. at the San Ysidro Port of Entry near the border at Tijuana and San Diego.

The identity of the shooter was not yet released Tuesday morning, but police said he was a white man.

San Diego police are leading the investigation. CBP is cooperating and will conduct an internal review.

ATF: Suspect in Virginia Beach Mass Shooting Legally Bought Handguns

Dewayne Craddock

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

A public works employee employee who opened fire at a municipal building in Virginia Beach, killing 12 people and seriously wounding several others legally, legally purchased the two handguns found at the scene, the ATF said.

The suspected gunman, Dewayne Craddock, a 40-year-old engineer who worked in public utilities, bought both .45 caliber handguns, one in 2016 and the other in 2018.

ATF agents believe the guns were not used in previous crimes. One of the guns had a suppressor and several empty extended magazines.

Additional weapons were found at the suspect’s home.

Authorities still don’t know what motivated the shooting. Craddock had put in his two-week notice and had no disciplinary actions during his 15 years at public works.

During an intense shootout with police, Craddock was killed. A police officer was shot in the stomach but was not seriously injured because of a bullet-proof vest.

Public Invited to Interact with DEA Special Agents During Lecture Series

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Ever wonder what it’s like to be a special agent for the DEA?

The DEA Museum in Arlington, Va., is offering the public an opportunity to hear from several special agents as part of a lecture series Tuesday. They will discuss who they are and what they do.

The event is free. Register at EventBrite.com. Can’t make it? The event will be live-streamed.

Speaking during the lecture series are Steve Fraga, who works with law enforcement counterparts in South America and Central America; Michelle Spahn, who serves as supervisory special agent and DEA 360 strategy coordinator; and Amador Martinez, who works on a number of assignments at DEA headquarters.

According to the event page:

Special Agents are on the front line for drug law enforcement in America and around the world. DEA’s goal is to eliminate illegal drug distribution, prosecute traffickers and destroy the financial infrastructure of these organizations. As the federal government’s premier drug law enforcement agency, our mission has never been so important. Agents are prepared for innumerable tasks including facilitating informant contacts, making drug arrests, community outreach, and international diplomacy.

Special Agents must maintain many skills to perform in less than ideal and often high pressure situations. While in the field, agents may investigate and help prosecute major violators of controlled substance laws, and partner with federal, state, local, and foreign officials in managing drug intelligence programs. Agents are often identified as the people who arrest and search subjects and seize assets connected to illicit drug trafficking, but they are also responsible for collecting and preparing evidence and performing other judicial functions. DEA Special Agents have a long-standing history in combating the critical problems of drug trafficking.

The event is from 11 a.m. to noon in the auditorium of DEA headquarters at 700 Army Navy Dr., Arlington, Va.

For more information, call the DEA Museum at (202) 307-3463.

Weekend Series on Crime: The Real Sopranos

AG Barr: Mueller ‘Could’ve Reached a Decision’ on Whether Trump Obstructed Justice

AG William Barr speaks with CBS News.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Even though Robert Mueller said a Justice Department policy prevents charging a sitting president, Attorney General William Barr said the former special counsel could have declared whether President Trump broke the law.

In a CBS interview aired Thursday evening, Barr said nothing stopped Mueller from deciding whether Trump obstructed justice.

“I personally felt he could’ve reached a decision,” Barr said. “He could’ve reached a conclusion.”

Barr made the comments a day after Mueller spoke publicly for the first time since the two-year special counsel investigation began in 2017. Democrats in Congress believed Mueller had suggested during the press conference that Congress should investigate the special counsel’s findings.

Barr said he wasn’t so sure that’s what Mueller was saying.

“I’m not sure what he was suggesting, but the Justice Department doesn’t use our powers to investigate crimes as an adjunct to Congress,” Barr said.
Mueller said he didn’t reach a conclusion on whether the president obstructed justice because “a president cannot be charged with a federal crime while he is in office.”

N.H. Man Sentenced to 16+ Years for Assaulting, Robbing ATF Informant

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A New Hampshire man was sentenced to 16-and-a-half years in prison for his role in the 2017 beating and robbing of an ATF informant who was trying to purchase guns.

Anthony R. Farmer, 26, of Manchester, and two co-defendants robbed and assaulted the unnamed informant who was helping the ATF and met the suspects at a Nashua home on the pretext of illegally buying firearms.

At the home, the suspects assaulted the informant and robbed him of the money that was intended to make the gun purchase.

Anthony Farmer

What the suspects didn’t know was that the informant was wearing audio and video surveillance equipment that captured the robbery and assault. The suspects were arrested soon after the assault.

In August 2018, Farmer pleaded guilt to conspiracy, robbery, assault, use of a firearm during a crime and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon.

Co-defendant Raymond Perez was sentenced to 51 months, and another co-defendant, Aaron Sperow, was sentenced to 102 months in prison.

“Violent crime involving firearms is a grave threat to the safety of the public,” U.S. Attorney Murray said in a news release.  “This substantial sentence shows that there will be serious consequences for those who choose to participate in crimes of violence. Through Project Safe Neighborhoods, we will continue to work with our law enforcement partners to protect our cities and towns from gun violence.”

“Today’s sentencing demonstrates law enforcement’s commitment to protect our communities from violent crime,” said ATF Special Agent in Charge Kelly D. Brady, ATF Boston Field Division. “ATF will continue to collaborate with our law enforcement partners to eradicate violent gun related crime and keep our neighborhoods safe.”

FBI Names Scott Brunner As Special Agent in Charge of San Diego Field Office

Scott Brunner, special agent in charge of the bureau’s San Diego Field Office.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Scott Brunner, a 16-year FBI veteran, has been appointed as special agent in charge of the bureau’s San Diego Field Office.

The FBI announced the appointment Wednesday.

Most recently, Brunner served as deputy assistant director of the Critical Incident Response Group, where he managed FBI surveillance, behavioral analysis, unmanned systems, and aviation.

With a bachelor’s degree from Arizona State University, Brunner is working on his master’s degree in unmanned systems from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University.

Brunner joined the FBI in 1995, when he was assigned to the bureau’s Portland Field Office in Oregon. After investigating violent and organized crime, he was transferred to the Oklahoma City Field Office, where is primary focus was public corruption.

In 2003, Brunner managed the joint FBI/Hungarian Organized Task Force at the Criminal Investigative Division at FBI headquarters in Washington D.C. After two years, he went to the San Diego Field Office and supervised a strike force that focused on Mexican drug traffickers.

In 2009, Brunner led the FBI Safe Streets and Gang Unit at the bureau’s headquarters. He received a promotion two years later, becoming assistant agent in charge of criminal and administrative programs at the FBI Field Office in Kentucky. He later headed Louisville’s national security and intelligence programs.

Between 2014 and 2016, Brunner served as the legal attaché in Bogota, Colombia and then was named as the chief of the surveillance and aviation section of CIRG.

Lawsuit: Women Sexually Harassed During FBI Training in Quantico

Training academy in Quantico, Va., via FBI.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

As the FBI tries to increase its ranks of female agents, 16 women have sued the bureau, claiming they were sexually harassed at the FBI’s training academy in Quantico, Va.

The lawsuit alleges the academy is a “good-old-boy network” that exposes women to a hostile work environment, inappropriate jokes and sexual advances beginning in 2015, The New York Times reports.

The suit also claims some of the women were discriminated against based on their race or disabilities. One African American trainee alleges an instructor called her “spaghetti head” because of her braids.

The lawsuit zeroed in on the mock town known as Hogan’s Alley, where trainees learn about tactical training with fake criminals and terrorists. This phase of training resulted in many women being kicked out of the academy.

“The real purpose of the suit is to change the culture of the F.B.I.,” said David J. Shaffer, the lawyer for the women.

Seven of the 16 women still work for the FBI.

The women are asking for more female training instructors, an examination of the training evaluation process and $300,000 each for emotional stress.

The FBI wouldn’t publicly comment on the lawsuit but told the New York Times in a statement that the bureau was “committed to fostering a work environment where all of our employees are valued and respected.”