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Obama’s Secret Service Nickname: “Renegade”

"Renegade"Following in an old Secret Service tradition, the first family-elect has some nifty little nicknames.   Obama is now the “Renegade” , which we assume he prefers over “Maverick”.

Rex W. Huppke
Chicago Tribune
Since the time of Harry Truman, presidents and their families have been assigned security code names.
Truman’s was “General.” Dwight Eisenhower was known as “Providence.” And John F. Kennedy, perhaps suggesting a Camelot theme, was “Lancer.”
The Obama family has received its new-and alliterative-names: “Renegade” (Barack), “Renaissance” (Michelle), “Radiance” (Malia) and “Rosebud” (Sasha).
These not-so-secret names used by the Secret Service are chosen by the White House Communications Agency, the brains behind dubbing Ronald Reagan “Rawhide” and Rosalynn Carter “Dancer,” Jacqueline Kennedy “Lace” and Caroline Kennedy “Lyric.”
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Incredulous Chicago Gang Enforcer Tells Indiana Fed Judge: “You’re Giving Me 40 Years for Guns?”

Maybe Bernard Ellis thought he’d be out of the joint in time for the next presidential election. But it looks like he won’t be out for the next one, or the next one, or….for a long long time.


By Frank Main
Chicago Sun-Times
The reputed chief enforcer of the Gangster Disciples in the Chicago area has been ordered to spend 40 years in prison for illegally purchasing guns in in northwest Indiana.
Bernard Ellis, 41, of Country Club Hills, seemed surprised by the long prison term handed down Monday.
“You’re giving me 40 years for guns?” Ellis exclaimed, insisting he never killed anyone.
He told the judge the sentence was “crazy” and said he’ll appeal. But U.S. District Judge Robert L. Miller Jr. said the sentence was justified, calling Ellis an “armed career criminal.”

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Read Sentencing Findings

Houston U.S. Atty the Latest To Dash For the Exit

U.S. Attorneys continue to hit the exit door as the Bush reign approaches the finish line. The latest is Don DeGabrielle who is off to private practice and presumably bigger bucks.

U.S. Atty. Donald DeGabrielle/official photo

U.S. Atty. Donald DeGabrielle/official photo

By Mary Flood
Houston Chronicle
HOUSTON — Tim Johnson has been named acting U.S. attorney for the Houston-based Southern District of Texas, taking over for Don DeGabrielle, who resigned as of last week.
Johnson, who was DeGabrielle’s first assistant, is a graduate of the South Texas College of Law in Houston and a former Internal Revenue Service special agent.
He was an assistant U.S. attorney for about four years in the 1980s before practicing at a law firm and as a solo litigator and criminal defense attorney for 17 years. He returned to the U.S. Attorney’s Office in spring 2006 to serve as DeGabrielle’s second-in-command.
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Thirty Retired FBI Agents Call For Pardon of 4 Navy Men Convicted of 1977 Rape

It’s not everyday you get 30 retired FBI agents to come to your defense or write a letter to the governor on your behalf asking for a pardon.

By Tom Jackman
Washington Post Staff Writer
RICHMOND, Nov. 10 — A group of 30 retired FBI agents added their voices Monday to the campaign calling for full pardons for four Navy men convicted in the rape and murder of a woman in Norfolk in 1997.
The men have come to be known as “the Norfolk Four,” and they have been the focus of a television documentary and a new book, “The Wrong Guys,” published this month. All four confessed involvement in the rape and stabbing death of 19-year-old Michelle Moore-Bosko inside her apartment, later recanted those confessions but were convicted anyway. Three are serving life sentences for murder, and the fourth was convicted of rape and has completed serving his 8 1/2 -year term.
The retired agents, members of the Society of Former Special Agents of the FBI, sent Virginia Gov. Timothy M. Kaine (D) a letter in July seeking pardons for Joseph Dick, Derek Tice, Danial Williams and Eric Wilson. After they received no response, they decided to hold a news conference here Monday, led by Jay Cochran Jr., who headed the Virginia State Police criminal investigations bureau and was commissioner of the Pennsylvania State Police after a 29-year FBI career.
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Things Are Hopping at Our U.S. Airports- 32 Firearms Found In One Week

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com
WASHINGTON — You may think those TSA security folks look bored and really never find much these days. Think again.
Just in a week’s time, from Nov. 3 to Nov. 9, 9 passengers were arrested because of suspicious behavior or fraudulent travel documents, according to the Transportation Security Administration.
Plus, TSA workers found 32 firearms at checkpoints and 1 “artfully concealed prohibited item”. On top of all that, there were 16 incidents that involved a checkpoint closure, terminal evacuation or “sterile area breach.”
And the week before, up in the skies,  a United airlines crew had to use duct tape to keep a passenger in her seat after she went berserk and started swearing and hitting people, including a blind passenger.

Defense Attacks in Ft. Dix Terrorism Trial Could Hurt Govt. Case

The defense in the Ft. Dix terrorism trial is punching some holes in the government case. The big question is: Will the government’s case hold up?

wcbstv.com

wcbstv.com

By George Anastasia
PHILADELPHIA Inquirer
CAMDEN, N.J.–The chief FBI informant in the Fort Dix terrorism investigation said yesterday that at least one of the defendants in the case considered him “the brains” and the leader of the plot to attack the military complex.
And, in a comment that seemed to support the defense theory of the case, he said that two other defendants, brothers Dritan and Shain Duka, “wanted nothing to do with the matter” when he first alluded to it during a fishing trip in August 2006.
By that point, according to earlier testimony and evidence, informant Mahmoud Omar, 39, had held several in-depth discussions with defendant Mohamad Shnewer, 23, about the plan and had been assured by Shnewer that the Dukas, including a third brother, Eljvir, were committed.
“I was surprised of [the Dukas’] lack of knowledge of anything we had discussed,” Omar said in recounting the reaction of Dritan and Shain Duka to comments he made during the fishing trip.
For Full Story

See Daily Transcript Of The Trial and Videos

ICE’s John Torres Expected To Take Over the Agency

John Torres/ice photo

John Torres/ice photo

By Chris Battle
Security DeBrief
WASHINGTON — John Torres, the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Operations at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), is expected to take the helm after yesterday’s announcement that Assistant Secretary Julie Myers is stepping down.
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Also Read 10 Most Important Jobs to be Filled at the Dept. of Homeland Security (Security DeBrief)

Beware: Justice Dept. Moving in on Secret Swiss Bank Accounts

Hiding money in Swiss banks may not be what it’s cracked up to be, or for that matter, be worth the risk.

By David S. Hilzenrath
Washington Post Staff Writer
WASHINGTON — The U.S. government has chipped new holes in the secrecy of Swiss bank accounts, obtaining the names of American clients of the banking giant UBS as part of an investigation into the use of foreign banks to evade taxes.
In an unusual move, the Swiss have turned over information on about 70 UBS clients for use by Justice Department investigators, a source close to the case said.
The Swiss were responding to a Justice Department request for information on Americans who held “undeclared” accounts at UBS in Switzerland — accounts that they had not revealed to the Internal Revenue Service, the source said.
Meanwhile, criminal investigators have obtained the names of an additional 30 or so American holders of undeclared UBS accounts from other parties, and people with inside knowledge of the bank have been giving federal prosecutors information about UBS’s conduct, said the source, who spoke on condition of anonymity because of the matter’s sensitivity.
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