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James Dennehy Named Special Agent in Charge of the Intelligence And Surveillance Division of NY Field Office

FBI’s New York Field Office, via FBI.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

James E. Dennehy has been named special agent in charge of the Intelligence and Surveillance Division of the New York Field Office.

Dennehy, who most recently served as chief of staff in the National Security Branch at bureau headquarters in Washington D.C., spent most his FBI career in the New York Field Office.

In fact, when Dennehy joined the FBI as a special agent in 2002, he was assigned to the New York Field Office to work counterintelligence cases

Dennehy was promoted in 2013 to supervisory special agent of the counterintelligence and counter-proliferation squad in New York’s Hudson Valley and White Plains resident agencies.

In 2015, Mr. Dennehy began serving as unit chief in the Counterproliferation Center at FBI headquarters, and a year later, he was promoted to assistant section chief. In those jobs, Dennehy kept foreign adversaries away from “export-controlled, sensitive technologies related to weapons of mass destruction and missile, space, and conventional weapons systems,” the FBI said in a news release.

In 2017, Dennehy returned to the New York Field Office as the assistant special agent in charge of crisis management, firearms, operations command, recruiting, private sector engagement, community outreach, and several other programs.

In 2018, Dennehy was promoted to chief of staff to the executive assistant director of the National Security Branch at FBI headquarters. In addition, he served as the section chief of the NSB’s Executive Staff Section. (The NSB includes the Counterterrorism Division, the Counterintelligence Division, the Weapons of Mass Destruction Directorate, the Terrorist Screening Center, and the High-Value Detainee Interrogation Group.)

Before joining the bureau, Dennehy earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Villanova University. He then served for seven years as an officer in the U.S. Marine Corps and was deployed to Haiti, Liberia, and the Adriatic Sea.

During his career at the bureau, he received the FBI Director’s Award for Outstanding Counterintelligence Investigation, the Attorney General’s Award for Furthering the Interests of National Security, and numerous National Intelligence Meritorious Unit Citations.

William Webster Defends FBI Against ‘Dangerous’ Attacks by Trump And Barr

William Webster (Wikimedia Commons)

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

William Webster has a unique perspective: He’s the only American to lead both the FBI and CIA.

In an op-ed in The New York Times, Webster defended the federal agencies against attacks by President Trump and Attorney General William Barr.

“Today, the integrity of the institutions that protect our civil order are, tragically, under assault from too many people whose job it should be to protect them,” wrote Webster, who was FBI director from 1978 to 1987 and CIA director from 1987 to 1991.

Webster said he was “deeply distributed” by Trump’s suggestion that the current FBI director, Christopher Wray, “cannot fix what the president calls a broken agency.”

“The president’s thinly veiled suggestion that the director, Christopher Wray, like his banished predecessor, James Comey, could be on the chopping block, disturbs me greatly,” Webster wrote. “The independence of both the F.B.I. and its director are critical and should be fiercely protected by each branch of government.”

Webster took aim at Barr’s assertion that the inspector general’s report was based on a “bogus narrative.”

The report found there was sufficient evidence to launch the Russia investigation, Webster pointed out.

“There were more than 100 contacts between members of the Trump campaign and Russian agents during the 2016 campaign, and Russian efforts to undermine our democracy continue to this day,” Webster wrote. “I’m glad the F.B.I. took the threat seriously.”

Webster said he has “complete confidence in Mr. Wray, and I know the FBI is not a broken institution.”

“It is a professional agency worthy of respect and support. The derision and aspersions are dangerous and unwarranted.”

Comey Says FBI Vindicated, But Admits Was ‘Wrong’ Defending FISA Process

James Comey via FBI.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Former FBI Director James Comey admitted Sunday that he was wrong to defend the bureau’s process of obtaining a warrant to monitor Carter Page, an adviser to Trump’s 2016 campaign.

But Comey said the inspector general report vindicated himself and the FBI because it concluded the bureau didn’t improperly open its investigation into the Trump campaign, nor did it act with bias.

“I was wrong,” Mr. Comey said on “Fox News Sunday,” referring to the bureau’s use of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act to monitor Page. “I was overconfident, as director, in our procedures. And it’s important that a leader be accountable and transparent. If I were still director, I’d be saying the same thing that [FBI Director Christopher Wray] is saying, which is that we are going to get to the bottom of this, because the most important question is, is it systemic? Are there problems in other cases?”

According to the report, the FBI made “17 significant inaccuracies and omissions” in the applications to surveil Page.

Trump seized on Comey’s admission that mistakes were made in the FISA process.

“So now Comey’s admitting he was wrong,” the president tweeted Sunday. “Wow, but he’s only doing so because he got caught red handed. He was actually caught a long time ago. So what are the consequences for his unlawful conduct. Could it be years in jail? Where are the apologies to me and others, Jim?”

The report, however, contradicted Trump’s larger conspiracy theories that the bureau acted with political bias as part of a “deep state” conspiracy.”

“The inspector general did not find misconduct by F.B.I. personnel, did not find political bias, did not find illegal conduct,” Comey said.

Weekend Series on Crime History: Attorney General John Mitchell

Former AG Eric Holder Blasts William Barr As ‘Unfit to Lead the Justice Department’

Former AG Eric Holder, via DOJ.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Former Attorney General Eric Holder blasted current Attorney General William Barr’s rhetoric “as deeply inappropriate,” saying he was “unfit to lead the Justice Department.”

Holder, who served as President Obama’s attorney general from 2009 to 2015, wrote a Washington Post op-ed criticizing Barr’s comments disputing the investigation of his own department’s inspector general. The report contradicted Trump’s repeated claims that the FBI illegally spied on Trump’s campaign.

Holder said he was “reluctant to publicly criticize my successors” but “Barr has made a series of public statements and taken actions that are so plainly ideological, so nakedly partisan and so deeply inappropriate for America’s chief law enforcement official that they demand a response from someone who held the same office.”

Holder also responded to Barr’s “extraordinary” claim, which was made “without offering any evidence,” that the FBI had acted in “bad faith” when it launched the Russia investigation.

“As someone who spent six years in the office Barr now occupies, it was infuriating to watch him publicly undermine an independent inspector general report — based on an exhaustive review of the FBI’s conduct — using partisan talking points bearing no resemblance to the facts his own department has uncovered,” Holder wrote.

Jacqueline Maquire becomes special agent in charge of New York Field Office’s Criminal Division

In 2004, Jacqueline Maguire testified about the 9/11 terror attacks.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

Jacqueline Maguire has been named special agent in charge of the Criminal Division of the New York Field Office, where she began her career 19 years ago.

Maguire, who most recently served as deputy assistant director of the Office of Public Affairs at FBI headquarters, joined the FBI as a special agent in 2000 and was assigned to the New York Field Office as a member of the Joint Terrorism Task Force. A year later, Maguire was the lead agent investigating the five people who hijacked American Airlines Flight 77, which crashed into the Pentagon.

In 2006, Maguire began working at the Counterterrorism Division at FBI headquarters, serving as the supervisory special agent and then unit chief.

In 2011, Maguire moved to the Washington Field Office, serving as a supervisory special agent. Then in 2014, she became special assistant to the executive assistant director of the Human Resources Branch at FBI headquarters.

In 2016, Maguire became assistant special agent in charge of the Birmingham Field Office in Alabama, overseeing criminal and administrative issues. A year later, she was promoted to section chief in the Office of Public Affairs in 2017. A year later, she was promoted to deputy assistant director of the office.

Maguire was twice awarded for service, receiving the Attorney General’s “Award for Excellence in Furthering the Interests of U.S. National Security” in 2006 and the Attorney General’s “Award for Distinguished Service” in 2009.

Before coming to the FBI, Maguire worked at the Office of the Medical Examiner in Suffolk County, NY.

Maguire attended Villanova University, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in comprehensive science. At Long Island University, she earned a master’s degree in criminal justice. And at the Naval Postgraduate School, she earned a master’s degree in homeland defense and security.

ICE Deports Just a Tiny Fraction of the ‘Millions’ Trump Pledged in June

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

President Trump’s pledge to deport “millions” of undocumented immigrants fell far short, it turns out.

New numbers released by immigration officials show the U.S. deported about 12,000 family members and unaccompanied minors in the last fiscal year, The Washington Post reports.

In June, Trump threatened large-scale arrests.

Here’s what actually happened: ICE removed more than 6,300 family members between Oct. 1, 2018, and Sept. 30, 2019, which is more than double the previous year.

ICE deported another 6,351 border-crossers who were unaccompanied minors, which is 14% higher than the previous year.

At a news conference Wednesday in Dallas, Acting ICE Director Matthew T. Albence said the operation to arrest families was “just the beginning.”

“We’ve removed more than double the family units,” Albence said. “And I suspect those numbers will go up this year as well as we continue to work these cases.”

FBI Employees Also Exchanged Pro-Trump Text Messages During Campaign

Inspector General Michael Horowitz testifying before Senate Judiciary Committee.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

President Trump has long seized on anti-Trump text messages between two FBI employees to push his unfounded conspiracy theories that the bureau tried to undermine his candidacy.

Turns out, some FBI employees were found to have tweeted politically charged text messages in favor of Trump.

Testifying before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday, Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz revealed that he also found pro-Trump text messages between FBI employees.

“So FBI employees held personal political views that were both favorable & unfavorable toward the candidate at that time?” Sen.Dianne Feistein D-Calif., asked.

“Correct,” Horowitz responded without elaborating.