Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

June 2021
S M T W T F S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



News Story

Ex-FBI Agent Says Shooting Detroit Imam 20 Times Was Justified

Greg Stejskal

Greg Stejskal

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Retired FBI agent Greg Stejskal, a columnist for ticklethewire.com, tells the Detroit News that he thinks agents acted appropriately when they fatally shot an imam 20 times during an October raid in Dearborn, Mi, after the imam shot and killed an FBI dog.

“Once you’ve made the decision to use deadly force, you fire until the threat is eliminated,” Stejskal told the News. He said he studied the medical examiner’s report and media reports and spoke to FBI agents.

Stejskal spent more than 20 years on the Detroit FBI’s SWAT and now teaches at the police academy at Washtenaw Community College.

Agents shot and killed Detroit imam in the warehouse raid that was part of a probe into stolen goods.

The News reported that Dawud Walid, executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations of Michigan, “said he wants to wait and review the investigative reports of the shooting and have an independent pathologist review the medical examiner’s report.”

“The reality is that none of us were at the scene,” he told the News. “We really don’t know what happened.”

To read more click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Christmas Day Bomber Read Rights 9 Hours — Not 50 Minutes– After His Arrest, Administration Says

Suspect Abdulmutallab/u.s. marhsals photo

Suspect Abdulmutallab/u.s. marhsals photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The political bickering and posturing over the questioning of the Christmas Day bomber continued in true Washington fashion Sunday.

Ex-Vice President Dick Cheney, who some may view as being on a campaign to prop up or save his legacy, went on ABC and said the administration should have considered everything up to waterboarding when questioning the infamous Christmas Day bomber Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab. Then Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) went on Fox and criticized the administration for reading the bomber his Miranda rights “within 50 minutes”.

Then on Sunday, according to the Washington Post, “senior administration officials” released information saying that the bomber was read his Miranda rights 9 hours — not 50 minutes — after his arrest.

After 50 minutes of questioning, the story goes, medical personnel said his condition had deteriorated to the point questioning was no longer possible.

Then nine hours later, the Post reports:”New FBI agents meet with Abdulmutallab in his hospital room. He says he will not answer their questions and “acted like a jihadi. He is read his Miranda rights.”

To Read Full Story click here.

Ex-FBI Agent and Justice Official Allan Kornblum Who Helped Create Surveillance Act

justice logo2By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Allan Kornblum, 71, a Florida federal magistrate, an ex-FBI agent who worked on civil rights cases in the 1960s, and a Justice Department official credited with writing key passages of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act  (FISA), died last week of cancer in Gainesville, Fla., the Washington Post reported.

Kornblum, a former New York City cop, worked for the FBI in the 1960s and joined the U.S. Justice Department in 1975 to “write the FBI’s guidelines for domestic security and counterintelligence work,” wrote Post reporter Patricia Sullivan.

“He was appointed three years later by then-Attorney General Griffin Bell to handle all FBI and National Security Agency wiretap applications as deputy counsel for the Office of Intelligence Policy and Review,” the Post wrote.

In May 2003, he became a U.S. magistrate judge in Florida and “worked until a week before his death,” the Post reported.

To read more click here.

Column: The Rich Irony of the Fall of a Louisiana State Sen. and His Ties to Bill Jefferson

Allan Lengel

Allan Lengel

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Sometimes public corruption — particularly in Louisiana  — has a way of making you snicker — at least for a moment.

The sentencing in U.S. District Court in New Orleans of ex-State Sen. Derrick Shepherd on Thursday to 37 months in prison for money laundering made me think of the rich irony of his downfall and his ties to disgraced ex-Congressman William Jefferson.

Back in October 2006, as a reporter for the Washington Post, I attended a candidate debate at the Omni Royal Orleans Hotel in the French Quarter in New Orleans  for the 2nd Congressional District where Rep. William Jefferson was making a bid for a 9th term.

At the time, Jefferson was under FBI investigation, but had yet to be indicted.

During the debate, which was attended by citizens and local and national media, the challengers kept taking shots at Jefferson, making references to his FBI investigation, implying his problems made it impossible for him to effectively represent the electorate in the fragile post-Katrina era.

Ex-Sen. Shepherd/senate photo

Ex-Sen. Shepherd/senate photo

One of those challengers happened to be Sen. Shepherd.

At one point, Jefferson could take  no more. He started attacking the integrity of the challengers and when he got to Shepherd, he strongly hinted of an ethical breach, saying:  “I will not say what we have to talk about there. But if pushed I will.”

Jefferson went on to beat Shepherd in the primary and eventually won re-election. (Jefferson lost a bid for a 10th term.)

And two years later, in 2008,  Shepherd pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit money laundering after helping previously convicted bond broker Gwendolyn Moyo launder $141,000 from the sale of bogus bonds, according to the New Orleans Times-Picayune.  Shepherd kept nearly half the money.

Interestingly, the indictment said Jefferson had steered Shepherd to Moyo after he lost in the 2006 primary to Jefferson. (Jefferson was not charged in that case).

And just as interesting, after Shepherd lost in the 2006 primary, he decided to endorse Jefferson in the main election, the guy he had previously declared was crooked and couldn’t be effective as a Congressman while under FBI investigation.

Interesting how all that works.

As we know, Jefferson was eventually indicted and convicted last Fall of  multiple public corruption counts stemming from many crooked business dealings over the years. He was sentenced to 13 years in prison. He is free pending his appeal.

Hopefully, Jefferson and Shepherd will get the opportunity to spend some quality time together behind bars.

I’m sure they’ll  be able to appreciate the rich irony of it all.

Ex-V.P. Cheney Says Waterboarding Should Have Been Option in Christmas Day Underwear Bomber Case

FBI and Justice Likely to Consult With Intelligence Community on Miranda Rights

intelligenceBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — After all the unnecessary political grandstanding, the administration is doing what it probably would have done anyways in the wake of the Christmas Day bombing incident.

The Washington Post’s Walter Pincus, one of Washington’s premier reporters, writes that the Justice Department and FBI will “consult with the intelligence community on information about terrorism suspects arrested in the United States before deciding whether to read them their Miranda rights under a plan now under review in the White House, according to senior administration officials.”

“We are analyzing lessons learned [in the Detroit Christmas Day case] with the goal of ensuring full information from across the government is available to law enforcement personnel on the ground as they conduct interrogations and make decisions on how to handle terrorist suspects,” a senior official said Friday, according to the Post.

To read more click here.

Weekend Series on History: A 1951 Feature on the FBI

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x9Gbc1eBdNI

Feds in Texas Indict 25 Suspected Members of Colombian Drug Cartel

colombia
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

In recent years, the spotlight has turned to the violent Mexican drug cartels shipping drugs into the U.S.

But on Friday, U.S. Attorney John M. Bales in Dallas announced the indictment of 25 suspected members of a Colombian drug cartel that moved massive amounts of cocaine into the U.S. through Mexico and Central America.

Authorities said the probe, to date, had resulted in the seizure of 7.5 tons of cocaine and $4.25 million in assets.

All 25 defendants are Colombian, and 21 are currently being detained in that country.

“In this operation, the agents, both American and Colombian, are literally reaching across hemispheres to strike a blow against a criminal organization that is a vital lifeline to several Mexican drug cartels,” the U.S. Attorney said.