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SEC Lawyer Revealed Identity of FBI Informant, IG Says

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The Inspector General for the Securities and Exchange Commission discovered a big no no: A lawyer for the SEC allegedly disclosed the name of a confidential source in an FBI probe to a witness in the case, the Washington Post reported.

The Post’s David Hilzenrath reports that a SEC lawyer also disclosed that the informant was recording conversations for the government.

That information was included in a report to Congress submitted by the Inspector General.

To read the full story click here.

Atty. Gen. Eric Holder Loves HBO Show “The Wire”; Urges Creators to Bring it Back

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — For realism, apparently Atty. General Eric Holder Jr. feels the acclaimed HBO show “The Wire” can’t be beat.

In fact, Holder, who is a big fan of the show that ended in 2008 after five hit seasons, wants the creators David Simons and Ed Burns to start it up again, according to the Washington Examiner.

Holder, who made the statements while standing near some cast members Tuesday at the Justice Department, thinks it’s very realistic, and therefore, a great educational tool.

The Justice Department and members of the show have joined forces to highlight the pervasive problem of drugs and how it impacts children and families.

“Having looked at those clips again, I’m reminded how great that series was,” he said, according to the Examiner. “I want to speak directly to Mr. Burns and Mr. Simon, do another season of ‘The Wire.’ … I want another season, or a movie.”

The Examiner said Holder and other government officials thinks the show accurately depicts how kids are exposed to the use, manufacture and sale of drugs. The paper reported that the Justice Department last year created an intra-agency task force to help these children, who often become victims of violence.

To read more click here.

Eastern European Mob #1 Priority for FBI in South Fla.

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

South Florida isn’t just the home of  white belts, white shoes, early bird specials and transplanted New York mobsters.

The Miami Herald reports that the Eastern European mob has become a big concern for the FBI — bigger than the Italian mafia.

“Eurasian organized crime is our No. 1 priority,” FBI supervisory special agent Rick Brodsky of the Miami office told the paper.

To read the full story click here.

Confessed Terrorist Tried to Help FBI Track Down Other Terrorists; Tells of Plot to Kill CEO of Drone Manufacturer

By Sebastian Rotella
ProPublica

CHICAGO—Confessed terrorist David Coleman Headley was so eager to cooperate after his 2009 arrest that he worked with FBI agents to try to engineer the capture of a suspected mastermind of the 2008 Mumbai attacks and proposed setting up another kingpin for a missile strike, according to testimony in federal court Tuesday.

Headley, a Pakistani-American businessman who has pleaded guilty in the Mumbai case and a plot against Denmark, testified that during two weeks of interrogation in October 2009 he worked with FBI agents to try to lure Sajid Mir, a member of the Lashkar-i-Taiba militant group and a suspected mastermind of the Mumbai attack, out of Pakistan so he could be arrested. The attempt failed, Headley testified, and Mir remains a fugitive.

Headley also offered to travel undercover to the tribal areas of Pakistan and present Ilyas Kashmiri, an al Qaeda-connected leader indicted in the Denmark plot, with an ornate sword that Headley suggested could be outfitted with a homing device to set up a U.S. missile attack, according to his testimony.

Headley revealed Tuesday that Kashmiri wanted to assassinate the chief executive officer of the Lockheed Martin Corp, which manufactures the Predator drone, as retaliation for the missile strikes that have killed scores of militants in Pakistan.

“Kashmiri was working on a plan,” Headley testified. “He said he knew people who had already done surveillance. And he asked if weapons were available in the U.S.”

Headley, who did not further describe the details of the plot, met with Kashmiri twice in Pakistan in 2009, according to his confession. Officials with the FBI and the Justice Department declined to comment on Headley’s mention of a plot targeting Lockheed CEO Robert J. Stevens. Lockheed officials also declined comment, citing a policy of not discussing specific threats against the company.

Read more »

Pentagon Refiles Charges Against 9/11 Suspects: Sets Stage for Military Trial

Khalid Sheik Mohammad

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The Obama administration appears to be paving the way to prosecute 9/11 suspected terrorist Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and four others in a military tribunal.

CNN reported that the Defense Department on  Tuesday  refiled charges against the men so they can be prosecuted in a military court in the Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, naval base.

The Justice Department had initially announced plans to prosecute the men in U.S. District Court in New York. But the powerful opposition forced the administration to shift gears.

Besides Mohammed, the other suspects included: Walid bin Attash, Ramzi bin al-Shibh, Ali Abdul Aziz Ali and Mustafa Ahmed al-Hawsawi. All five are at Guantanamo.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

2 Iraqis Arrested in Bowling Green, Ky. on Terrorism Charges


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Up until now, Bowling Green, Ky. was known mostly as the home of a General Motors assembly plant that builds Chevy Corvettes, Fruit of the Loom and Western Kentucky University.

But on Tuesday, the Justice Department announced the arrest in Bowling Green of two Iraqi men who allegedly tried to send sniper rifles, stinger missiles and money to Al-Qaida operatives in their home country. One man, Waad Ramadan Alwan was alleged to have carried out attacks in Iraq against American troops, authorities said.

Alwan, 30, and Mohanad Shareef Hammadi, 23, both former Iraqi residents residing in Bowling Green, were charged in a 23-count indictment returned by a federal grand jury in Bowling Green last Thursday.

Alwan is charged with conspiracy to kill U.S. nationals abroad; conspiracy to use a weapon of mass destruction (explosives) against U.S. nationals abroad; distributing information on the manufacture and use of IEDs; attempting to provide material support to terrorists and to al Qaeda in Iraq; as well as conspiracy to transfer, possess, and export Stinger missiles, the Justice Department said.

Hammadi is charged with attempting to provide material support to terrorists and to al Qaeda in Iraq, as well as conspiracy to transfer, possess, and export Stinger missiles.

The men were arrested last Wednesday.

The Justice Department said both defendants were closely monitored in the months leading up to the arrests. Neither were charged withg plotting attacks in the U.S.

“Over the course of roughly eight years, Waad Ramadan Alwan allegedly supported efforts to kill U.S. troops in Iraq, first by participating in the construction and placement of improvised explosive devices in Iraq and, more recently, by attempting to ship money and weapons from the United States to insurgents in Iraq,” said Todd Hinnen, Acting Assistant Attorney General for National Security.

“His co-defendant, Mohanad Shareef Hammadi, is accused of many of the same activities. With these arrests, which are the culmination of extraordinary investigative work by law enforcement and intelligence officials, the support provided by these individuals comes to an end and they will face justice,” said Todd Hinnen, Acting Assistant Attorney General for National Security.

Ex-Atty. Gen. Ashcroft Dodges Bullet; Supreme Court Tosses Lawsuit Against Him

John Ashcroft/doj photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Ex-Atty. Gen. John Ashcroft is off the hook.

In an 8-0 ruling, the Supreme Court tossed out a lawsuit against Ashcroft. It overturned a 9th Circuit Court of Appeals decision, saying the former Attorney General under President Bush  enjoyed “qualified immunity” from a lawsuit filed by Abdullah al Kidd, a former University of Idaho football player who converted to Islam.

The court ruled that Ashcroft did not clearly violate the 4th Amendment right against unreasonable searches and seizures.

FBI agents arrested Kidd in 2003 at Dulles Airport and detained him for 16 days in three different states as a material witness supposedly for a pending case. He was never charged and never called as a witness.

Kidd claimed Ashcroft abused his power by detaining him as a material witness. He also alleged the arrest was part of a bigger plan by the Bush administration to round up Muslims, regardless if whether they had ties to terrorism.

But the Supreme Court, in a ruling written by Justice Antonin Scalia, wrote: “The affidavit accompanying the warrant application (as al-Kidd concedes) gave individualized reasons to believe that he was a material witness and that he would soon disappear.”

“Qualified immunity gives government officials breathing room to make reasonable but mistaken judgments about open legal questions. When properly applied, it protects ‘all but the plainly incompetent or those who knowingly violate the law’,” the court wrote.

”We hold that an objectively reasonable arrest and detention of a material witness pursuant to a validly obtained warrant cannot be challenged as unconstitutional on the basis of allegations that the arresting authority had an improper motive. Because Ashcroft did not violate clearly established law, we need not address the more difficult question whether he enjoys absolute immunity.”

Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen G. Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor voted to overturn the lower court ruling, but conceded that the law in this area is not completely clear. Justice Elena Kagan did not participate.

Read Opinion

Agencies Jumping on the High Tech Wagon; ATF Using iPads and iPhones


By Michael S. Rosenwald
Washington Post Staff Writer

WASHINGTON — Somewhere in America, perhaps at this very moment, a bad guy is under video surveillance. He is being watched, every movement, every step – but not on a little TV. That’s so 2009. Instead, a special agent from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives is keeping tabs on an iPad.

This is not a movie. This is not a Steve Jobs dream. This is the federal government 2.0, where technology upgrades no longer come at a “Little House on the Prairie” pace. Even President Obama, a BlackBerry devotee, has upgraded. He now owns an iPad, and it has been seen on his desk and under his arm.

The flashy consumer products that have been adopted in the corporate workforce – upending BlackBerrys for iPhones, Microsoft Outlook for Gmail and, lately, laptops for iPads – are now invading the federal government. The State Department. The Army. The Department of Veterans Affairs. NASA. The General Services Administration is in the process of moving 17,000 employees onto Gmail.

To read full story click here.