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2 Ex-FBI Officials Pen a Book on Management Tips Learned on the Job


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Ex-FBI officials Kathleen McChesney and William Gavin become the latest ex-agents to pen a book.

The two have teamed up to write a book — “Pick Up Your Own Brass: Leadership the FBI Way”, which offers 50 ” essential leadership lessons based on challenges that FBI officials have faced over the course of their careers” while working at the FBI.

The authors claim the “book can help anyone—established leaders, aspiring leaders, minority leaders, and even ‘accidental executives’ who find themselves managing more than they imagined—build a culture of leadership.”

The two have paid their dues.

McChesney, of Los Angeles, the only female special agent to be named the Bureau’s executive assistant director, left law enforcement after 31 years to take on a leadership position at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops and the Walt Disney Company. She is currently a consultant for businesses and non-profit organizations.

Kathleen McChesney

William Gavin

Gavin, a 28-year veteran of the FBI, who resides in Boston, reached the position as assistant director in charge. Since then, he has held executive positions in the health care industry and for a security services provider. He has been a commentator for MSNBC, Fox News, and CNN and is currently a business consultant.

The book will be available on Amazon on May 31. For more info on the book click here.

Column: Ex-Fed Prosecutor Weighs Pros and Cons of Legalizing Marijuana

Ross Parker was chief of the criminal division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for 8 years and worked as an AUSA for 28 in that office. Sixteen of those years were in the drug unit. He is the author of the book “Carving Out the Rule of Law: The History of the United States Attorney’s Office in Eastern Michigan 1815–2008″.

Ross Parker

By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

The case for and against marijuana legalization continues to be a hotly debated issue. Weighing in, even in a subjective and limited way, is tempting after working on a history project about smugglers in the 1970s and the agents who pursued them.

Here’s the pros and cons as I see it.

There is good reason to conclude that many of the trends favor some kind of decriminalization or legalization in the United States. Many point to the growing number of states that have authorized Medical Marijuana as a key sign that we’re moving in that direction.

A dozen or so states have legislatively instituted some form of decriminalization or “harm reduction” program for use or possession of small amounts. Drug policies in several European countries such as the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, and Switzerland, have established such a system.

Millions of dollars are being invested in a wide variety of public relations and lobbying activities, especially in states where referendums are pending. The arguments in favor of this development seem easier to grasp and calculate, and the well-financed campaigns have achieved some success in promoting this agenda.

On the other hand, proponents of the status quo seem less focused and their arguments more speculative. At times, the assumption of the hippie dealers of a half-century ago, who predicted the drug would eventually be legally available, seems a strong possibility.

Read more »

Trail to Osama bin Laden Began with a Phone Call

He became a familar fixture on the list.

By Bob Woodward
The Washington Post

WASHINGTON — It seemed an innocuous, catch-up phone call. Last year Abu Ahmed al-Kuwaiti, the pseudonym for a Pakistani known to U.S. intelligence as the main courier for Osama bin Laden, took a call from an old friend.

Where have you been? inquired the friend. We’ve missed you. What’s going on in your life? And what are you doing now?

Kuwaiti’s response was vague but heavy with portent: “I’m back with the people I was with before.”

There was a pause, as if the friend knew that Kuwaiti’s words meant he had returned to bin Laden’s inner circle, and was perhaps at the side of the al-Qaeda leader himself.

The friend replied, “May God facilitate.”

To read full story click here.

OTHER WEEKEND STORIES OF INTEREST

FBI Documents Show Boxing Great Rock Marciano Received Threats to Lose Fight in 1954

By Allan Lengel
ticklthewire.com

FBI documents show that someone wrote letters to boxing legend Rocky Marciano threatening to kill his wife and child if he didn’t lose a fight to underdog Ezzard Charles on June 17, 1954, according to the Enterprise of Brockton.

“Listen Cocky Rocky,” one letter dated March 9, 1954 began, according to the publication. “We mean business.”

It went on to urge him to lose the fight or “or we will bump off your wife and little child…We’ll get them sooner or later…You bet on that.”

It was signed “Desperate Duo.”

The paper went on to report that FBI documents showed Marciano’s father received an an extortion letter, and his manager Al Weill received repeated calls threatening to kill him and Mariano.

The documents show a man named Joseph Hannigan, 23, of Glenolden, Pa., was arrested for writing the letters. He explained that he wrote them because he was for the underdog.

Marciano won the bout in 15 rounds.

Weekend Series on Crime: The Somali Pirate

Mexican Man Indicted in Murder of Border Agent Brian Terry

Brian Terry

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A Mexican man has been indicted in the murder last Dec. 14 of U.S. Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry in Southern Arizona.  Terry was killed during a firefight.

Manuel Osorio-Arellanes, of El Fuerte, Mexico, and his co-defendants, who are fugitives,  were charged in a 14-count indictment that was unsealed Friday, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said. The names of his co-defendants remain under seal while they are on the lam.

Osorio-Arenllanes was arraigned Friday in Tucson. Trial is set for June 17 before U.S. District Court Judge David C. Bury in Tucson.

Terry’s murder became the subject of a controversy after Rep. Darrell Issa (R-Calif) and Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Ia.) claimed that a gun sold through ATF’s Operation Fast and Furious may have been used to kill him. The operation encouraged gun dealers to sell to straw purchasers, all with the hopes of tracing the weapons to the drug cartels.

“Today’s indictment is an important step in this case, but it is only a first step to serving justice on behalf of Agent Brian Terry, his family and the other agents who were with Terry and their families,” said U.S. Attorney Dennis K. Burke. “This is an active ongoing investigation that is making more and more progress every day.”

Burke added: “Agent Terry – who served his country honorably as both a Marine and a member of the Border Patrol – made the ultimate sacrifice in service to the people of the United States. His family deserves to see justice served, and everybody involved in this investigation is deeply committed to making that happen.”

Authorities alleged that  Osorio-Arellanes was part of an armed group of illegal immigrants who got into  a firefight with Agent Terry and other border patrol agents in  a remote area known as Mesquite Seep near Rio Rico, Ariz.

Agent Terry died from his wound.

Authorities said Osorio-Arellanes, who was wounded, was apprehended, treated for his injuries. Authorities had him detained on felony immigration charges.

On Friday, Rep.  Issa issued a statement on the arrest:

“The announcement of an indictment against Manuel Osorio-Arellanes for the murder of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry is certainly good news, but leaves critical questions unanswered.

“The Justice Department still hasn’t said how and why guns purportedly being tracked and monitored by federal law enforcement officials as part of Operation Fast and Furious ended up in the hands of Agent Terry’s killers.”

“It angers me to think that this death might not have occurred had it not been for reckless decisions made by officials at the Department of Justice who authorized and supported an operation that knowingly put guns in the hands of criminals. For these officials to imagine that this operation would result in anything other than a tragic outcome was naive and negligent. Sen. Charles Grassley and I continue to demand accountability as we investigate this matter.”

Bin Laden Plotted to Derail U.S. Train to Commemorate 9/11, AP Reports

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The sentimental guy that he was, Osama bin Laden wanted to commemorate the upcoming 10th anniversary of 9/11 with a plot to derail a U.S. train, the Associated Press reported.

AP reported that materials seized during the raid at the Pakistan compound showed bin Laden was scheming since last year.

“One idea outlined in handwritten notes was to tamper with an unspecified U.S. rail track so that a train would fall off the track at a valley or a bridge,” AP reported.

“Counterterrorism officials said they believe the plot was only in the initial planning stages, and there is no recent intelligence about any active plan for such an attack,” AP wrote.

Nearly Six Months After Nomination, No Confirmation Hearing Set for ATF’s Andrew Traver

Andrew Traver/zerocancer.org photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON —  Nearly six months after the White House nominated Andrew Traver to head ATF, there’s no sign of a confirmation hearing.

The Senate Judiciary Committee said there’s nothing scheduled for Traver, who heads  the ATF Chicago Office, and explained that the committee has so many confirmation hearings to deal with.

But some observers think there’s more to it.  They think ATF is a low priority, plus they think there’s no hurry to rush the confirmation process in the midst of the bubbling controversy over an ATF program known as Operation Fast and Furious, in which gun dealers in Arizona were encouraged to sell to straw purchasers — all with the hopes of tracing the weapons to the Mexican cartels. Some of the guns ended up being used in crimes.

James Cavanaugh, a former ATF official, said Friday that he suspects that the controversy over Operation Fast and Furious will probably delay the confirmation.

“I think it will have an impact, I think it will delay the director,” he said. ” Its such a big dust up on the Hill.”

He said the gun lobbying groups, which oppose Traver’s nomination, may also use the controversy over Fast and Furious to delay the confirmation.

“The gun lobbying groups don’t want Traver,” he said. “If they can use the controversy to stall the confirmation and block it and drag it out, they will.”

Traver was nominated last November.