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Report: ATF Exploits Mentally Disabled People, Children During Questionable Investigations

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

ATF used some questionable tactics in investigations that included exploiting mentally challenged people, an investigation by the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel showed.

 After reviewing thousands of documents, the paper found:

■ ATF agents befriended mentally disabled people to drum up business and later arrested them in at least four cities in addition to Milwaukee. In Wichita, Kan., ATF agents referred to a man with a low IQ as “slow-headed” before deciding to secretly use him as a key cog in their sting. And agents in Albuquerque, N.M., gave a brain-damaged drug addict with little knowledge of weapons a “tutorial” on machine guns, hoping he could find them one.

■ Agents in several cities opened undercover gun- and drug-buying operations in safe zones near churches and schools, allowed juveniles to come in and play video games and teens to smoke marijuana, and provided alcohol to underage youths. In Portland, attorneys for three teens who were charged said a female agent dressed provocatively, flirted with the boys and encouraged them to bring drugs and weapons to the store to sell.

■ As they did in Milwaukee, agents in other cities offered sky-high prices for guns, leading suspects to buy firearms at stores and turn around and sell them to undercover agents for a quick profit. In other stings, agents ran fake pawnshops and readily bought stolen items, such as electronics and bikes — no questions asked — spurring burglaries and theft. In Atlanta, agents bought guns that had been stolen just hours earlier, several ripped off from police cars.

To read more click here.

 

Judge: FBI Has Right to Access Woman’s Facebook Posts in Lawsuit

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Be careful what you write on Facebook.

In one case, the FBI has the right to access the Facebook posts of a woman who is suing the bureau over what she claims was a misguided 2011 raid, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports.

Shaquel Adams must turn over pages from her Facebook account, particularly to demonstrate claims that she suffered from severe emotional distress.

“While the Court acknowledges that discovery of such matters is intrusive and regards personal matters which are typically not shared publicly, by asserting claims seeking damages for their emotional distress allegedly sustained during the events of March 3, 2011, Plaintiffs have put their own mental health, therapy and school records at issue in this case,” U.S. District Judge Nora Barry Fischer wrote.

FBI Capable of Spying on Computer Users by Remotely Activating Web Cams

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The little web cam at the top of your computer may seem innocuous, but advanced technology is allowing the FBI to activate the camera and monitor you, the New York Post reports.

Investigators can see real-time images by remotely turning on web cams.

But that’s not it.

New technology also is allowing the FBI to download files, e-mails and photos.

High-Ranking DOJ Official Tries to Improve Life for Native Americans

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DOJ’s third-highest official is traveling to the Dakotas to for a hearing on the impact of violence on Native Americans and their children, the Associated Press reports.

“One of the reasons why it’s important for me to go to Indian country periodically is to remind myself that people living there do not give up. And if they’re not giving up, we’re not giving up,” the official, U.S. Associate Attorney General Tony West, said.

The task force meeting is designed to address violence on reservations, especially against women and children.

 

Border Patrol Agent Finds 2-Year-Old Boy Left Behind in Desert in New Mexico

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Federal authorities are trying to figure out the identity of a 2-year-old boy who was found in the desert, the El Paso Times reports.

A Border Patrol agent spotted the child and a man between Anapra and the Santa Teresa point of entry in New Mexico.

The man fled back to Mexico and left the boy behind.

Authorities said the boy appeared to be in good health, the El Paso Times reported.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

FBI’s Search for ‘Mo,’ Suspect in Bomb Threats, Highlights Use of Malware for Surveillance


By Craig Timberg and Ellen Nakashima
Washington Post Staff Writers

WASHINGTON –– The man who called himself “Mo” had dark hair, a foreign accent and — if the pictures he e-mailed to federal investigators could be believed — an Iranian military uniform. When he made a series of threats to detonate bombs at universities and airports across a wide swath of the United States last year, police had to scramble every time.

Mo remained elusive for months, communicating via ­e-mail, video chat and an ­Internet-based phone service without revealing his true identity or location, court documents show. So with no house to search or telephone to tap, investigators turned to a new kind of surveillance tool delivered over the Internet.

The FBI’s elite hacker team designed a piece of malicious software that was to be delivered secretly when Mo signed on to his Yahoo e-mail account, from any computer anywhere in the world, according to the documents. The goal of the software was to gather a range of information — Web sites he had visited and indicators of the location of the computer — that would allow investigators to find Mo and tie him to the bomb threats.

To read the full story click here.

Weekend Series on Crime: Hidden Tunnels and Border Wars

httpv://youtu.be/JbdN5I06kyc

FBI Likely to Leave Washington D.C. Because of Stringent Criteria on New Headquarters

 

Current FBI Headquarters

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The FBI most likely will leave Washington D.C. to find a new home because of strict criteria on the land, the Washington Post reports.

The new site must be at least 50 acres and within two miles from a Metro station.

That puts D.C. out of the picture, the Post reported.

Officials were looking at Poplar Point, but it doesn’t fit the criteria.

That puts “an urban, riverfront site such as Poplar Point at a significant competitive disadvantage, despite the fact that such a site can provide a secure location near many urban amenities,” Deputy Mayor Victor B. Hoskins said.