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Memorable Quotes from Murder, Racketeering Trial of ‘Whitey’ Bulger

Updated Bulger photo/wbur

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Brutal mob boss James “Whitey” Bulger was a colorful figure in the underground crime word.

So it’s no surprise his trial prompted some memorable quotes:

“After I heard that they were informants, it sort of broke my heart.”
– Ex-gangster and former Bulger partner John Martorano, who served just 12 years after admitting to murder 20 people.

“They hunted their targets. These men didn’t hunt animals, ladies and gentlemen, they hunted people.”
– Prosecutor Fred Wyshak, detailing the brutal details of Bulger’s murders.

“James Bulger is of Irish descent. And the worst thing an Irish person could consider doing is becoming an informant. That was the first and foremost reason why James Bulger was never an informant against people.”
– J.W. Carney Jr., defense lawyer for Bulger

“Bulger: “You suck.”
Weeks: “F— you, OK!”
Bulger: “F— you, too.”
Weeks: “What do you want to do?”
– Stephen “The Rifleman” Flemmi, explaining on the stand his response to do nothing when Bulger strangled his girlfriend.

“It’s affected me and it’s going to affect me until the day I die.”
– Exchange between Bulger and his former associate Kevin Weeks, who was testifying at the time.

“We killed people that were rats, and I had the two biggest rats right next to me.”
– Weeks, referring to Bulger and Flemmi

“My thing is, as far as I’m concerned, I didn’t get a fair trial, and this is a sham. And do what yous want with me.”
–Bulger to Judge Denise Casper

‘Whitey’ Bulger Verdict Closes Chapter on Two Decades of Brutal Rule in Boston’s Criminal Underworld

Whitey Bulger/fbi

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Notorious mob boss James “Whitey” Bulger, who seized Boston’s criminal underworld in the 1970s and ’80s, likely will spend the rest of his life behind bars after a jury found him guilty Monday of murder and racketeering.

Wearing a gray shirt, dark pants and sneakers, the 83-year-old who occasionally shouted  in anger during the trial showed little emotional response as the jury read guilty 32 verdicts following five days of deliberations.

Boston’s legendary figure, who spent 16 years on the run, will be sentenced Nov. 13, bringing to an end a brutal chapter in U.S. history.

Victims’ families respond

Bulger’s victims had been waiting for this moment for decades, but not everyone was happy. The jury decided the prosecution only proved its case in 11 of 19 murders.
“My father just got murdered 40 years later, again, today in this courtroom,” William O’Brien, whose father, also named William, was murdered, told the Boston Globe. “That prosecution dropped the ball. . . . That jury should be ashamed of themselves.”

For Patricia Donahue, the verdict provided some closure after Bulger was found guilty of killing her husband, Michael Donahue, 31.

“I couldn’t hold my emotions,” she told the Globe. “I cried for myself. I cried for [the other families], because we are all in the same place.

Her son, Tommy Donahue, felt mixed emotions.

“It’s a good feeling,” he said after the jury found Bulger killed his father. “But my heart also goes out to those families who were searching for that closure.”

Bulger wants Stanley Cup ring back

When feds finally tracked down Bulger in California, they found $822,000, guns, knives and other pricey belongings, such as a Stanley Cup ring.

According to a separate Boston Globe report, Bulger isn’t going to fight for his cash, guns and ammunition, but he wants his ring back.

Whether his wish is granted remains to be seen.

It’s unclear how Bulger acquired the ring, but the Globe reported that the mobster paid for the wedding of NHL player Chris Nilan, a Stanley Cup winner with the Montreal Canadiens.

Off-duty U.S. Customs and Border Patrol Agent Shot and Wounded in Detroit

Whitey Bulger Convicted of Murder and Racketeering

Updated Bulger photo/wbur

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com
In what came as no surprise, the homicidal Boston gangster James “Whitey” Bulger was convicted  Monday of  racketeering conspiracy and numerous racketeering acts of murder, extortion, narcotics distribution, money laundering and possession of firearms including machineguns. The convictions that are likely to keep him behind bars for the remainder of his life. 
 
The verdict in U.S. District Court in Boston came on the fifth day of deliberations in what was a closely watched case nationwide. The jury deliberated for 32 hours.
 
Bulger had been accused of killing 19 people. 

 

AG Holder Calls for More Lenient Sentences for Drug Offenders to Handle Prison Overcrowding

Atty. Gen. Eric Holder Jr.

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Attorney General Eric Holder has a partial solution to the U.S.’s massive prison overcrowding – less time for drug offenders.

The Associated Press reports that Holder is addressing overcrowding by favoring drug treatment and community service programs in lieu of long prison sentences. He also support the early release of some elderly inmates.

“We need to ensure that incarceration is used to punish, deter and rehabilitate — not merely to convict, warehouse and forget,” Holder says in the speech he’s scheduled to deliver Monday.

A major change includes ending mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenders without ties to gangs, cartels or other large organizations.

Families of Victims Await Justice As ‘White’ Bulger Trial Enters 5th Day of Deliberations

 

Whitey Bulger

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

As jurors begin their fifth day of deliberations in the racketeering and murder trial reputed mobster James “Whitey” Bulger today, relatives of victims are hoping for some closure and justice, the USA Today reports.

Theresa Barrett Bond, however, may never get that closure because she has lost trust in the law enforcement system because of the FBI’s underhanded involvement with Bulger.

Bond said she has no doubt Bulger, who was the leader of the infamous Winter Hill Gang, killer her father, Arthur Barrett in 1983.

Authorities said Barrett was murdered after refusing to give Bulger a share of stolen loot from a $1.5 million bank heist in 1980.

“Because we had government agents on the take for money, our dads are dead,” Bond said Friday as the jury deliberated. Bulger “would have been (taken) off the streets if the government had done what it was supposed to do.”

Prosecutors Allow Defendants to Walk Because of Botched Drug, Gun Case in Milwaukee

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The ATF’s botched sting in Milwaukee last year continues to unravel as the depth of the feds’ mistakes become better known.

The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reported prosecutors have dropped charges against another three defendants charged in an undercover ATF sting.

Milwaukee County Assistant District Attorney Karen Loebel said the three cases were dismissed to protect informants who set up the drug and gun deals.

The litany of mistakes continues to grow: Agents used a brain-damaged man to set up the deals. Government-owned guns were stolen from the undercover store front, and a total of $40,000 in merchandise has gone missing, the Journal Sentinel reported.

 

U.S. Angry Over Release of Mexican Drug Lord Convicted of Torture, Murder of DEA Agent

 

Enrique Camarena

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Mexican drug lord convicted of kidnapping, torturing and murdering a DEA agent in 1985 has been released from jail, a move that has incensed U.S. law enforcement, Slate reports.

The U.S. expressed deep frustration with a three-judge court that decided to overturn Caro Quintero’s sentence on the argument that he should have been prosecuted in state not federal court.

Slate reported that the U.S. is working with Mexican authorities to nab others responsible for the murder of DEA agent Enrique “Kiki” Camarena.”

The Justice Department is among the U.S. agencies expressing concern with Mexico.

U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul, Texas-R, called the decision to overturn Quintero’s sentence “insulting” and warned of a “negative impact” between U.S. and Mexico relations.