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Head of El Paso FBI David Cuthbertson Named Assistant Director

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

David Cuthbertson, head of the FBI’s El Paso Division, has been named assistant director of the Justice Information Services Division.

Cuthbertson joined the FBI in 1988 and was assigned to the Cincinnati Division working motorcycle and violent street gangs and drug trafficking.

In 1992, he transferred to the Dallas Division, where he investigated Mexican drug trafficking organizations. He was also assigned to the Plano Resident Agency, where he investigated white-collar crime, drug trafficking, and violent crime.

In 1997, Cuthbertson was promoted to a supervisory position in the FBI’s Criminal Investigative Division. He also served as acting unit chief of the Latin American Unit.

He was subsequently promoted to serve as field supervisor of the Denver Division’s Metro Gang Task Force. He eventually assumed program coordinator responsibilities for the organized crime and drug programs.

In 2002, he headed east to Chicago where he served as assistant special agent in charge of the Criminal Enterprise Branch. In 2004, he was given responsibility for the division’s international terrorism and domestic terrorism programs.

The following year, he was designated as an inspector. He was promoted to section chief in the Criminal Justice Information Services Division in 2005. Shortly after, in 2006, he was promoted to deputy assistant director within the division.

In November 2007, he was named head of the El Paso FBI.

 

Scott Sweetow Named Head of ATF’s Atlanta Division

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Scott Sweetow, who began his career with ATF in 1990 in Los Angeles, has been named special agent in charge of the agency’s Atlanta division.

Sweetow spent several years assigned in the Arson and Explosives group, and served as a Certified Explosives Specialist. His duties included being part of ATF’s elite National Response Team, which investigated such high-profile crimes as the Oklahoma City bombing and the Centennial Olympic Park bombings.

He also spent several years working criminal intelligence matters, including a weapons case targeting the “The Blind Sheikh” Omar Abdel-Rahman’s one time driver and bodyguard, Hikmat Alharahshah.

Specifically, in 1999, Sweetow became a supervisory special agent in the Phoenix Field Division, serving in operations and as violent crime enforcement group supervisor.

In 2003, he went to ATF headquarters where he served in the Policy Development and Evaluation branch, eventually becoming its chief. In July of that year, he became the first ATF agent to “deploy operationally to Iraq”, assisting the Defense Intelligence Agency as part of the Iraq Survey Group.

In 2004, Sweetow was promoted to a deputy division chief and later chief in the Arson, Explosives and International Training Division in ATF’s Training and Professional Development directorate. He remained there until  December 2006.

While division chief, Sweetow was instrumental in establishing ATF’s $50 million National Center for Explosives Training and Research at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama.

In January 2007, Sweetow became an Assistant Special Agent in Charge in the Atlanta Field Division. This month, he was named the SAC in Atlanta.

He has a bachelor’s degree in Russian and Soviet Area Studies and a masters in Strategic Intelligence. He is a graduate of Harvard University’s Senior Executives in National and International Security program.

In 2009, Scott he  published an article in “Homeland Security Today” entitled “After Mumbai: Facing the Flames” which dealt with the use of fire as an asymmetric warfare tool by terrorists.

Paul Lindsay; Ex-Detroit FBI Agent and Prolific Author of 7 Novels Dead at 68

Paul Lindsay/simon & schuster photo

 By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Paul Lindsay, the hard-digging FBI agent who became a prolific author, and wrote seven novels — the last two of which were N.Y. Times best sellers — died peacefully Thursday night at a Boston hospital of pneumonia with his family by his side. He was 68.

The ex-Marine, who friends kidded was a cop trapped in an agent’s suit, was known for his dogged pursuit of criminals, his sharp wit and sometimes a lack of patience for management.

Lindsay graduated from MacMurray College in 1968 and served a tour of duty in Vietnam as a Marine Corps infantry officer, according to his website. In the Marine Corps, he was a Company Platoon Commander who was awarded two Purple Hearts and the Silver for bravery, according to the family.

He later joined the FBI and worked in the Detroit office for 20 years. He lived in Rye, N.H.

He authored his first book at the tail end of his FBI career, which stirred controversy in the FBI because it was a thinly veiled novel that took shots at some folks in the agency.

He went on to write six other books. And just last month it was reported that Millenium Films had acquired the rights to “The Bricklayer”, his best-selling novel penned under the pseudonym Noah Boyd, according to the Hollywood Reporter.

Book was written under the pseudonym Noah Boyd

The report also noted that Scottish actor Gerard Butler is supposed to star in the film as a rogue former agent who’s services are needed to battle a criminal group that’s been demanding multi-million dollar ransom payments.

Friends and family  said that Lindsay died due to complications from pneumonia.

He had been diagnosed in 2005 with a blood cancer, leukemia,  that compromised his white blood cell count, the possible result of his exposure to chemical defoliates when he served in the Marines in Vietnam, the family said.

The condition eventually left him with compromised immune system, which made it difficult to fight off infection. The family said he kept his condition secret from everyone but his immediate family and one friend.

“He never wanted anyone to feel sorry for him or treat him differently–he never permitted himself that luxury,” his family wrote in an email to friends.

In part of a memoir the family shared with friends, Lindsay wrote:

“I am dying. A single cell, damaged and then mutated, is now multiplying at a Pandorian rate through my bloodstream. The aberration was triggered, from best guesses, by Agent Orange, the defoliant dumped so generously-18,000,000 gallons or so–on Vietanam to help keep American troops alive. An irony that is life itself.

“For me, it was over forty years ago. The medical term is Chronic Lyphocytic Leukemia, or to those of us on more intimate footing, CLL. The disease has reached stage four, and unfortunately there is neither a cure nor a stage five.

“. . . I have been the recipient of a great deal of luck in my life. But as John Steinbeck wrote in The Pearl, ‘Luck, you see, brings bitter friends’.”

“Recent events have made it apparent that good fortune is nothing more than a temporary statistical anomaly, which given enough time has little choice but to swing in an opposite and equal arc. In my case, leukemia. Given the extraordinary adventure my good luck has provided to my years, I can offer no complaint about the pendulum’s final resting place.”

His family concluded the email by saying: “Our Father will be missed, loved and remembered.”

Funeral services will be held at the Robert K. Gray, Jr. Funeral Home 24 Winnacunnet Road, Hampton, N.H. Saturday morning, Sept. 10 at 10 a.m.

Family and friends are invited to call to the funeral home on Friday 2:00-4:00PM and 7:00-9:00PM.

Interment will be at Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Va.

In his memory contributions may be directed to: The Wounded Warrior Program

 

FBI Number 2 Person Tim Murphy Stepping Down; Sean Joyce Will Replace Him

Timothy Murphy/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The FBI’s number two person Timothy P. Murphy is stepping down to take a position in the private sector, the FBI announced Wednesday.  Sean Joyce, the Executive Assistant Director of the National Security Branch, will replace him as the deputy director.

“Tim Murphy has earned the respect and admiration of his FBI colleagues and that of the entire law enforcement and intelligence community,” FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III said in a statement.  ” He will be missed.”

Murphy jumped to the number two spot in July 2010. He started with the FBI in 1988 and served in offices including Newark, Tampa, and Washington.

Joyce joined the FBI in 1987. He was first assigned to the Dallas Division, where he investigated violent crimes. He later worked on Colombian drug cases out of the Miami Field Office. In 1994, he became a member of the Bureau’s Hostage Rescue Team.

He worked his way through a number of jobs, and last year was named  the Executive Assistant Director of the National Security Branch.

Sean Joyce/fbi photo

“Sean Joyce has made tremendous contributions to the Bureau and met tough challenges head-on,” Director Mueller said. “I have every expectation that he will do the same as deputy director.”

FBI Agent Timothy Delaney Named Head of Criminal Division in LA

 

Timothy Delaney/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Timothy J. Delaney is heading off to Los Angeles to be the special agent in charge of the Criminal Division.

Delaney, who joined the FBI in 1991, most recently served as section chief for the New Agent’s Training Program Section in the FBI’s Training Division.

After joining the FBI, he first worked in the New York Field Office for nine years, where was assigned to the Manhattan office and investigated a variety of white-collar crimes, the FBI said.

In July 2000, he was promoted to unit chief at FBI Headquarters in the Criminal Investigative Division’s Health Care Fraud Unit, where he oversaw more than 400

From January 2005 to June 2008, Delaney served as assistant special agent in charge in the Miami Field Office where he managed division’s white-collar crime, cyber, and civil rights programs.

In Miami, he was involved in a number of cases involving crooked lobbyist Jack Abramoff, several county commissioners, and three police corruption rings.

 

Ex-Miss. U.S. Attorney Dunn Lampton Dies at 60; Office Prosecuted Old Civil Rights Era Cases

Dunn Lampton

By Allan Lengel ticklethewire.com

Former Jackson, Miss. U.S. Attorney Dunn Lampton, who was appointed by President Bush in 2001,  and led the prosecutions in some old civil rights case,  died Wednesday of  natural causes, the station WAPT reported. He was 60.

While serving as U.S. Attorney, his office led the prosecution of once-dormant civil rights cases against reputed Ku Klux Klansmen Ernest Avants and James Ford Seale, the station reported.

His office also prosecuted  hundreds of fraud cases after Hurricane Katrina. He retired in 2009.

John Giacalone Named Head of N.Y. FBI Counterterrorism Division

John Giacalone/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Agent John Giacalone is leaving the mothership at headquarters in D.C. and heading north to become special agent in charge of the FBI’s New York Field Office Counterterrorism Division.

Giacalone most recently served as the section chief of the Counterterrorism Division’s Domestic Terrorism Strategic Operations Section at FBI headquarters.

Giacalone is no stranger to New York.

In 1991, he was the case agent for an investigation into organized crime’s control of the airfreight industry at John F. Kennedy International Airport. That resulted in the indictment and conviction of seven members and associates of the Luchese crime family.

In 1994, Giacalone formed a task force consisting of FBI, Department of Labor and New York Police Department to investigate the Garment Center. The probe reuslted in the convictions of 15 organized crime members and associates, the FBI said.

In 2003, Giacalone created the Field Intelligence Group in Philadelphia. And in 2005, he was the deputy on-scene-commander in the Iraqi theater of operations.

There he coordinated the efforts of the FBI, the intelligence community, and the U.S. military, which resulted in the rescue of kidnapping victim Roy Hallums.

In 2008, Giacalone was a member of the Attorney General Guidelines Task Force. With the assistance of 10 supervisory special agents, he helped draft the FBI’s new domestic investigative policy.

First Black Secret Service Agent Charles Gittens Dies at Age 82

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Being the first is always worth noting.

And that’s what Charles L. Gittens was — the first black Secret Service agent. He became an agent in 1956 and retired in 1979, the Associated Press reported.

AP reported reported that Gittens died on July 27 in Maryland. He was 82.

According to an obituary in The Herald-Sun of Durham, N.C., Gittens was first assigned to the Charlotte, N.C., office and he worked in New York City office investigating counterfeiting and bank fraud.

He was fluent in Spanish and worked in the San Juan, Puerto Rico bureau and the D.C. office in 1969.

AP reported that after retiring in 1979, he worked for the Justice Department investigating war criminals.

AP reported that Danny Spriggs, vice president of global security for The Associated Press who had been a Secret Service agent, called Gittens “just an outstanding guy.”

“He went out of his way to mentor and give counsel and advice to young African-Americans who were coming up, especially those like myself who were coming up through the ranks.”

“The guy was always physically fit. He looked like he came out of the gym. His whole persona was one of professionalism: no nonsense guy.”