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Retired FBI Agent Mark Stephen Jimerson Dies at Age 59

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

 Mark Stephen Jimerson, a retired  FBI supervisory special agent, died last Thursday at his home in Mitchellville, Md., from a brain-related cancer. He was was 59.

In February 1985, Jimerson  was assigned to the FBI’s Tampa office, his first posting in the agency. While in Florida, he studied intensive Russian, according to information provided by the family.

He later went on to the FBI’s San Francisco office and began his career with foreign counter intelligence.

In the spring of 1995, he went to FBI Headquarters in Washington here he helped establish an FBI office in Moscow. He also served as a team leader and senior FBI agent for the first FBI delegation that provided law enforcement training in Russia, according to the family information.

He was also assigned to inter-agency taskforce investigating criminal activities involving Russian and Eastern European immigrants.

From 1997 to 2000, he served as the Assistant Legal Attaché, to the U.S. Embassy in Tallinn, Estonia.

In 2000, he was promoted to Legal Attaché to Ukraine where he served within the U.S. Embassy as Chief of the Office of the Legal Attaché and as primary FBI representative in Ukraine.

In 2002, Jimerson and his family returned to their home in Maryland. He was promoted to Unit Chief of the Office of International Operations from 2005 to 2006, acted as an FBI Liaison Officer in the Office of International Affairs from 2002 to 2004 and again from 2006 to 2008, and lastly as Unit Chief in the Eurasian Unit of the Office of International Affairs, the family wrote in a release.

He retired on June 6, 2008.

Jimmerson was born on Aug.  7, 1953 in Madison, Ill., the son of Louise Jimerson and the late Chance Jimerson. He is survived by his wife of 34 years, Wendy Jimerson; his daughter, Stephania Mahdi; son, Mark E. Jimerson; granddaughter, Yasmeen Mahdi; mother, Louise Jimerson; brothers, Alvin (Zella)Valentine and Victor (JoAnn) Valentine of Madison, Illinois, Willard (Sandra) Valentine of Portland, Oregon, and Terrence Jimerson of Madison Illinois; sisters, Autumn Ann Mitchell of Redondo Beach, CA and Shirlee Sue (Larry) Coleman of Flower Mound, TX; and a host of loving nephews, nieces, family and friends.

Jimerson was the youngest of seven children. He was very active in his youth and participated in plays, choir activities, and track and field, the family said.

In high school he showed promise in his Russian language classes and was encouraged by a Bulgarian priest, teaching at his high school, to continue his studies.

He enlisted in the U.S. Army and graduated with Honors from the Defense Language Institute, serving his country as a Russian Linguist.

He was assigned to the 856th Army Security Agency and was stationed in Germany where he was a Russian Voice Interceptor, the family said.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Russian Studies from Monterey Institute of International Studies.

 

Face of Chicago’s FBI Retires Following Diverse 32-Year Career

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

If the FBI had a face in Chicago, it would be Special Agent Royden “Ross” Rice.

The 32-year veteran of the bureau was a media darling, urging the public to help find the most notorious criminals.

Now Rice is retiring, the Chicago Sun Times reports.

Before becoming the Chicago office’s main spokesman, Rice spent time fighting organized crime and cracking cases including robbery and kidnapping.

“Ross is best described as a real professional. He was an accomplished and experienced field agent who worked in one of our most capable and successful resident agencies,” Robert Grant, the former special agent in charge of the FBI office, told the Sun Times. “He was the steady, trusted and confident face and voice of the FBI in Chicago. And he is a good and trusted adviser and friend to me.”

Former Head of San Antonio FBI Office to Take Over Chicago Office

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The former head of the FBI office in San Antonio has been named special agent in charge of the Chicago office, the Chicago Tribune reports.

The FBI is expected to announce the appointment of Cory B. Nelson this week.

Nelson will replace retiring Robert Grant, who headed the Chicago office for 7 years.

A 21-year veteran of the FBI, Nelson was in charge of the San Antonio office for two years before taking a post at FBI headquarters in Washington earlier this year, the Tribune wrote.

Nelson’s career began in New York, where he investigated organized crime. He also helped probe the Oklahoma City bombing, the Tribune reported.

Nelson earned a master’s degree in business administration from Baruch College in New York; he earned his bachelor’s degree in psychology from the State University of New York at Albany.

New Special Agent in Charge Named to FBI’s Birmingham Division

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 The FBI’s Birmingham Division has a new special agent in charge to replace Patrick J. Maley, who retired in August to become the South Carolina Inspector General, the Birmingham News reports.

Richard D. Schwein, Jr., who most recently served as a member of the FBI Counterterrorism Division, will oversee the northern judicial district of Alabama.

During Schwein’s 24 years at the FBI, he worked on criminal and national security issues and served on the SWAT team as an assaulter and tactical medic, the Birmingham News wrote.

Schwein received the FBI Director’s Award of Excellence for Outstanding Counterterrorism Investigation in 2003.

Schwein also supervised the manhunt for serial bomber Eric Robert Rudolph, who was captured.

Before joining the FBI, Schwein was an intelligence officer in the U.S. Army and served in combat in the Middle East as part of a special operations force, the Birmingham News reported.

Schwein is married with twin daughters.

Alex J. Turner named Assistant Director of FBI’s Security Division

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 Alex J. Turner was named assistant director of the FBI’s Security Division, which is responsible for ensuring a safe work environment for employees, the bureau announced Monday.

Turner began his career as a special agent with the FBI’s Atlanta Division in 1985, investigating drug and property crime.

In 1988, Turner moved to Atlanta, where he managed the Multi-Agency Gang Task Force. In 1993, Turner supervised the Atlanta Regional Drug Intelligence Squad.

Turner was assigned to assistant special agent in charge of the Washington office in 2000. Five years later, Turner managed the FBI’s violent gang, drug and major theft investigative programs.

Turner was appointed special agent in charge of the Norfolk  Division in 2008.

Turner earned a bachelor’s degree in criminology from the University of Maryland.

Philly FBI Boss George C. Venizoles to Take Over New York Office

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 George C. Venizelos, head of the FBI’s Philadelphia division, will be named assistant director in charge of the bureau’s New York field office, the Philadelphia Inquirer reports, citing anonymous sources knowledgeable of the move.

A New Jersey native, the 52-year-old served as interim assistant director in charge of the New York office for several months in 2010 until Janice Fedarcyk was given the job.

Venizelos became special agent in charge of the Philadelphia office, the same post Fedarcyk had held.

Fedarcyk left the bureau for the private sector this summer.

The FBI wouldn’t comment on Venizelos’ new job until there was an official announcement, possibly as early as today.

Head of FBI’s Washington D.C. Office Announces Retirement, Leaving Void in Counterterrorism Expertise

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 James W. McJunkin, the head of the FBI’s Washington field office, announced his retirement Thursday after just two years on the job.

Authorities said the retirement is a blow to counterterrorism efforts because McJunkin had a plethora of experience in foiling and investigating terrorist plots, the Washington Post reports.

McJunkin is a former state trooper whose expertise in counterterorrism helped him climb the ranks of the FBI.

McJunkin plans to take a corporate security position in Chicago.

“He’s done a great job,” U.S. Attorney Ronald Machen said in a statement through his spokesman. “He’s a dedicated and committed public servant and he’ll be missed.”

The FBI has not yet announced a replacement.

Bill Lewis Tapped to Head up the FBI’s Los Angeles Office

 

Bill Lewis/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Bill L. Lewis, a former legal attache for the FBI in Baghdad, has been named assistant director in charge of the FBI’s Los Angeles Division.

Lewis most recently served as deputy assistant director in the Human Resources Division at FBI Headquarters.

He began his career in 1988 in the Omaha division and three years later he went to Atlanta where he investigated domestic terrorism and drugs.

He was promoted to supervisory special agent in September 1997 and had the responsibilities of managing the 1996 Centennial Olympic Park bombing investigation. At some point, he supervised the hunt for fugitive Eric Rudolph.

In November 1999, Lewis went to FBI headquarters as a supervisory special agent in the Violent Crimes/Fugitive Unit in the Criminal Investigative Division.

In August 2004, he was named assistant special agent in charge of the Mobile Division.

From April to October 2008, he was the Counterterrorism Division’s on-scene commander in Iraq, and from January 2009 to January 2010, he served as legal attaché for the FBI in Baghdad.

In February 2010, Mr. Lewis was promoted to special agent in charge of the Criminal Division in Los Angeles.