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Milestone

Veteran FBI Agent, a Pennsylvania Native, Becomes Director of Office of National Counterintelligence Executive

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI Agent William Evanina, who helped investigate the anthrax attacks in 2001 and the hijacking of United Airlines Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001, is moving to a new job, Citizens Voice reports.

Evanina has been appointed director of the Office of the National Counterintelligence Executive, giving him a important role in the country’s security.

“The office of the national counterintelligence executive leads the entire US government in protecting America from counterintelligence threats,” Evanina said.

Evanina, a Pennsylvania native, worked 25 years in the U.S. government and 18 years for the FBI. He worked on organized crime and was a trained sniper.

“Working on violent crimes is beyond dangerous,” he said. “It showed me how violent and dangerous a country and a city could be but that there (are) a good people out there.”

Jackson FBI’s First Black Special Agent in Charge Daniel McMullen Plans Retirement Just Short of Office’s 50th Anniversary

Daniel McMullen/FBI photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Daniel McMullen, the first black special agent in charge of Jackson’s FBI office, has announced his retirement.

“As a person with an interest in history itself and the history of the civil rights movement and an understanding of where Mississippi was in the history of civil rights, I find it very interesting now that I am where I am,” he said recently, according to the Clarion-Ledger.

The Jackson field office, which celebrates its 50th anniversary in July, was reestablished following the deaths of civil rights workers James Earl Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner.

“From being a student of history, reading about these historical figures, and then to meet them,” McMullen said. “Charles and Myrlie Evers, Gov. William Winter, James Meredith. Some of the Freedom Riders I’ve met — there are so many folks that lived it, and to hear what the world was like back then, and the multiple narratives about the role of the FBI. Where you stand on the issues definitely depends on where you sit.”

But McMullen, who also worked in New York, Washington D.C. and Los Angeles, went far beyond civil rights issues. One case involved the kidnapping of Alexandria and Kyliyah Bain in 2012 and tracking down the man responsible – Adam Mayes.

“He was one of our top 10 fugitives,” McMullen said. “That provided a tremendous example of how law enforcement can cooperate in response to a critical incident.”

Correction: In an earlier version, Daniel McMullen’s name was spelled incorrectly.

Frank Montoya Jr. Becomes Next Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s Seattle Division

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Frank Montoya Jr., who acted as head of national counterintelligence for the U.S. government, has been named special agent in charge of the FBI’s Seattle Division, the Seattle Times reports.

Montoya most recently served as the national counterintelligence executive in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence.

Montoya replaces Laura M. Laughlin, who abruptly retired in February.

Montoya joined the FBI in 1991 and was first stationed in the San Antonio Field Office, where he worked violent crime and fugitive investigations. He also worked temporarily in the Oklahoma office to help in the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building bombing investigation.

In June 1996, he transferred to the San Juan Field Office and worked in the special operations group and was a surveillance team leader on drug, violent crime, and national security cases, the FBI said.

He then went off to the Washington Field Office’s national security squad, and in April 2000, he went to headquarters where he oversaw national security investigations and operations. During that time, he assisted with the Robert Hanssen investigation.

In November 2002, he went to the Milwaukee Field Office where he was a supervisor and oversaw the counterintelligence squad and several national security investigations.

In 2005, it was back to headquarters where he was promoted to unit chief in the Counterintelligence Division.

In July 2007, he became a special agent in charge of the counterintelligence branch in the San Francisco office.

New DEA Head of Houston Division Brings Plethora of Border Experience

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Joseph Arabit, the new head of the Houston Division of the DEA, arrives with a plethora of border experience that authorities hope will help crack down on drug cartel activity between the Texas-Mexico border, KHOU.com reports.

Arabit previously was in charge of the DEA office in El Paso at a time of intense activity from rival drug cartels crossing the border into the U.S.

“The murder rate in Juarez started to climb in 2008,” said Arabit recalling his first few months as special-agent-in-charge in El Paso.

Despite the violence across the border of El Paso, the U.S. city remained relatively safe because of Arabit’s actions to work with local, state and other federal agencies to clamp down.

“Once we had those individuals identified we did all that we could to link them to a U.S. crime they had committed in the past and then took it a step further,” Arabit said.

ATF’s Scott Sweetow Moving Up to Deputy Assistant Director

Scott Sweetow

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Scott Sweetow, who heads up ATF’s St. Paul, Minn., office is moving up the chain.

He”ll be taking over the job as Deputy Assistant Director for ATF’s Office of Strategic Intelligence and Information (OSII).

His new responsibilities will include ATF’s partner engagement liaison with the intelligence community, overseeing ATF’s foreign operations and training, counterterrorism division, Joint Support and Operations Center, criminal intelligence division and the U.S. Bomb Data Center.

Sweetow has headed up the St. Paul Division, which includes which includes Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota and South Dakota.

Sweetow, who began his career with ATF in 1990 in Los Angeles, spent several years assigned in the Arson and Explosives group, and served as a Certified Explosives Specialist. His duties included being part of ATF’s elite National Response Team, which investigated such high-profile crimes as the Oklahoma City bombing and the Centennial Olympic Park bombings.

He also spent several years working criminal intelligence matters, including a weapons case targeting the “The Blind Sheikh” Omar Abdel-Rahman’s one time driver and bodyguard, Hikmat Alharahsheh.

Specifically, in 1999, Sweetow became a supervisory special agent in the Phoenix Field Division, serving in operations and as violent crime enforcement group supervisor.

In 2003, he went to ATF headquarters where he served in the Policy Development and Evaluation branch, eventually becoming its chief. In July of that year, he became the first ATF agent to “deploy operationally to Iraq”, assisting the Defense Intelligence Agency as part of the Iraq Survey Group.

In 2004, Sweetow was promoted to a deputy division chief and later chief in the Arson, Explosives and International Training Division in ATF’s Training and Professional Development directorate. He remained there until December 2006.

While division chief, Sweetow was instrumental in establishing ATF’s $50 million National Center for Explosives Training and Research at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama.

In January 2007, Sweetow became an Assistant Special Agent in Charge in the Atlanta Field Division and later went on to become the SAC in Atlanta.

He has a bachelor’s degree in Russian and Soviet Area Studies and a masters in Strategic Intelligence. He is a graduate of Harvard University’s Senior Executives in National and International Security program and the FBI’s Law Enforcement Executive Development Seminar.

In 2009, Scott he published an article in “Homeland Security Today” entitled “After Mumbai: Facing the Flames” which dealt with the use of fire as an asymmetric warfare tool by terrorists.

 

Walter R. Walsh, Former FBI Agent, Olympian and Marine Corps Sniper, Died at 106

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Walter R. Walsh chased gangsters as an FBI agent in the 1930s before becoming the longest-lived Olympian.

He died at 106 at his home in Arlington, Va., the Associated Press reports.

Walsh also trained Marine Corps snipers.

In 1934, Walsh joined the FBI and began pursuing gangsters. His efforts led to the capture of Arthur “Doc” Barker in Chicago. He also fatally shot Russell “Rusty” Gibson – one of between 11 and 17 gangsters he killed, his son said.

Walsh also joined the Marine Corps and trained snipers in North Carolina.
In the London Olympics in 1948, Walsh placed 12th in the men’s 50-meter free pistol event.

Pittsburgh’s New FBI Leader Is Tested on Third Day with Mass Stabbing at High School

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It was just Scott S. Smith’s third day as special agent in charge of the FBI’s Pittsburgh office when a student slashed and stabbed classmates in a hallway at Franklin Regional High School last week.

“It was a horrific incident,” Smith told the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette for a story. “Behind the scenes, though, there’s a lot of investigative activity, evidence collection, witness interviews that have to be done, and they have to be done then.”

Smith allotted 20 agents to the investigation, which includes interviews and evidence reconstruction.

“He was battle-tested in his very first week,” said U.S. attorney David Hickton, who was on the scene with Mr. Smith.

Smith is in charge of 145 FBI agents, in a addition to other support staff and local law enforcement.

Retired DEA Agent Was Trailblazer for Better Treatment of African Americans, Women in Bureau

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Arthur Lewis, the first African American acting deputy administrator of the DEA, rose to prominence after starting his career on the hardscrabble streets of Harlam as an undercover agent.

The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that Lewis is credited with breaking down racial barriers and winning a legal battle in the 1970s to improve treatment of black and female agents.

It was a tough journey that spanned nearly three decades and involved some of the most dangerous assignments, Lewis, 84, told the Inquirer during an interview at his home in Cherry Hill.

“It was hard work and it was difficult,” Lewis recalled. “But to me, it was very worthwhile.”

Added Lewis Rice, a former special agent, “He’s a living legend, a legend for all ages.”

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