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Stanley M. Meador Named Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s Richmond Field Office

FBI Special Agent Stanley M. Meador

By Steve Neavling

Stanley M. Meador has been tapped to serve as special agent in charge of the FBI’s Richmond Field Office in Virginia. 

Meador, a native of Galax, Va., had been serving as chief of staff to the deputy director at FBI headquarters.

Meador’s career with the FBI began in 2002, when he was assigned to the Spokane Resident Agency in Washington, a satellite of the Seattle Field Office. He investigated violent crime, gangs, and Indian Country crimes, worked on intelligence matters, spearheaded the creation of the Safe Streets and Safe Trails task forces, and served as a firearms instructor and crisis negotiator.

In 2009, Meador joined the Las Vegas Field Office to investigate public corruption, violent gangs, and criminal enterprises.

In 2013, Meador was promoted to supervisory special agent and transferred to the International Operations Division (IOD) at headquarters. He was later promoted to chief of the IOD’s Asia Unit.

In 2015, Meador became supervisory senior resident agent of the Wilmington Resident Agency of the Charlotte Field Office, where he oversaw criminal and national security programs.

In 2019, Meador was named assistant special agent in charge in the Philadelphia Field Office, where he led administrative and special operation, overseeing 12 programs and all crisis management matters.

In 2020, he became chief of staff to the deputy director.

Before joining the FBI, Meador served as a special agent with the Virginia Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. Meador received a bachelor’s degree from Roanoke College in Salem, Va., and a master’s degree from The American University in Washington. 

Meador also received a Declaration of Valor for his response to the Pentagon during 9/11.

Kirpy Retires from Border Patrol After 7 Years of Service

Kirpy retired from CBP after seven years of service.

By Steve Neavling

Kirpy, a Belgian Malinois that has served with U.S. Customs and Border Protection since he was a puppy, has retired. 

Kirpy was born on Thanksgiving Day in 2012 at the CBP Canine Center in El Paso and at four moths old was reared and trained at the Yuma Sector in Arizona.

His final shift with his handler Agent Rolando Carbajal was Friday. 

Throughout his seven-year career, Kirpy has detected more than $85,000 worth of marijuana and hashish and more than $140,000 worth of methamphetamine. He also participated in public demonstrations at schools, RV parks and community events. 

“That dog was awesome,” Special Operations Supervisor Mark Sims said in a news release. “We used Kirpy whenever we had demos. He could do it all and his temperament was really good.”

Kirpy was named after fallen Nogales Border Patrol Agent Alexander Kirpnick, who was killed in the line of duty on June 3, 1998, while trying to arrest smuggling suspects.   

Kirpy is now enjoying retirement with Carbajal’s son, and he’s already gone on a fishing trip. 

“He’s loving retirement,” Carbajal said. “He’s able to come inside and hang out. Everything is new [for him].”

Former DHS Secretary Chad Wolf Launches New Consulting firm

Acting Homeland Security Secretary Chad Wolf.

By Steve Neavling

Former Homeland Security Acting Secretary Chad Wolf is starting a new consulting firm with three other former senior officials. 

The firm, Wolf Global Advisors, will be tasked with advising companies, NGOs and government agencies on homeland and national security issues, Politico reports.

Joining Wolf are former acting chief of staff Scott Erickson, former deputy chief of staff Tyler Houlton and legislative affairs director Beth Spivey.

“During my time at DHS, I came to know and came to realize that a number of organizations, whether they’re companies or non-profits really struggle with assessing risk and security issues facing their respective organizations,” Wolf told Politico. “Others want to better understand the department, whether they’re regulated by the department, or perhaps they have technology or services to help the department better fulfill their mission.”

Wolf says he has a few clients already but declined to identify them. 

Wolf stepped down as acting secretary in January. 

Special Agent Bryan Vorndran Picked to Lead FBI’s Cyber Division

Bryan A. Vorndran, special agent in charge of the New Orleans Field Office.

By Steve Neavling

Bryan A. Vorndran, who had been serving as special agent in charge of the New Orleans Field Office, has been named assistant director of the Cyber Division at FBI Headquarters. 

Vorndran became an FBI special agent in 2003. On his first assignment, he primarily investigated cocaine and heroin trafficking.

In 2008, he joined the International Contract Corruption Task Force in Afghanistan for five months before being promoted to supervisory special agent at the Counterterrorism Division at FBI headquarters. In 2012, he was promoted to unit chief.

In 2013, Vorndran began leading the Washington Field Office’s Joint Terrorism Task Force. Three years later, he was promoted to assistant special agent in charge of the cyber and counterintelligence programs at the Baltimore Field Office.

In 2017, Vorndran was promoted to chief of the Strategic Operations Section of the Counterterrorism Division at Headquarters.

A year later, Vorndran was named a deputy assistant director of the Criminal Investigative Division, overseeing FBI programs focused on helping dismantle transnational criminal organizations involved in violent crimes that impacted the U.S.

Before joining the FBI, Vorndran was an engineer in the private sector. In 1998, he earned a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from Lafayette College, and in 2012, he received a masters of business administration from the Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan.

Garland Sworn in As Attorney General, Vows to Restore Faith in DOJ

Attorney General Merrick Garland is sworn in. Photo via DOJ.

By Steve Neavling

Attorney General Merrick Garland was sworn-in Thursday and pledged to “adhere to norms” and restore the Justice Department’s reputation for political independence. 

“We are united by our commitment to protecting our country as our oath says, ‘from all enemies, foreign and domestic.’ And by our commitment to enforcing our country’s laws and to ensuring the civil rights and the civil liberties of our people,” Garland said in an address to the DOJ’s 115,000 employees on his first day of work. “The only way we can succeed and retain the trust of the American people is to adhere to the norms that have become part of the DNA of every Justice Department employee since Edward Levi’s stint as the first post-Watergate attorney general.” 

He concluded the speech by saying, “I am honored to work with you once again. Together, we will show the American people by word and deed that the Department of Justice pursues equal justice and adheres to the rule of law.”

Read Garland’s full speech here.

The Senate confirmed Garland on Wednesday with a 70-30 vote. 

Garland, 68, rose to national prominence in 2016 when President Obama nominated him to the U.S. Supreme Court, but Republicans denied him a hearing. 

Garland was appointed to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit in 1997. 

Garland is a graduate of Harvard University’s college and law school. 

Retired FBI Agent to Lead Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards And Training

By Steve Neavling

A retired FBI agent has been tapped to lead Oregon’s police safety certification and training agency. 

Gov. Kate Brown appointed Jerry Granderson to serve as director of the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training, The Oregonian reports reports.

Granderson, 57, who retired from the FBI in April, starts his new job on March 22 and will be paid $162,216 a year.

The agency has more than a $55 million budget and is tasked with developing training and certification/licensing standards for more than 41,000 public and private safety professionals. The professionals include police officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, liquor control regulatory specialists, emergency dispatchers, criminal justice instructors, private security providers, private investigators, and polygraph examiners.

At the FBI, Granderson investigated narcotics, domestic terrorism and organized crime in Illinois. He also was a program manager for the bureau’s international law enforcement training academies in Botswana, Hungary, El Salvador and the United Arab Emirates.

“His background in law enforcement and public safety—with a blend of field, training, program management, and leadership experience—makes him uniquely suited for this position,” Brown said in a statement. “I look forward to his leadership, especially as we work collaboratively to improve the training and certification of Oregon law enforcement officers and as we answer the resounding calls from Oregonians for much-needed racial justice and police accountability reforms.”

Grandson received a fine arts degree and a master’s degree in international relations from Western Illinois University. He also served in the U.S. Army’s 82nd Airborne Division and 12th Special Forces Group of the Army Reserves. 

Dennis Rice Tapped to Lead FBI’s Salt Lake City Field Office

Special Agent Dennis W. Rice

By Steve Neavling

Dennis W. Rice has been named the special agent in charge of the FBI’s Salt Lake City Field Office. 

Before the appointment, Rice was serving as deputy assistant director for the Enterprise Cybersecurity Office at FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C.

His career with the FBI began in 1997 in the St. Louis Field Office, where he investigated violent crime, organized crime, counterintelligence and cyber cases. In 2005, Rice was promoted to chief security officer and was the information systems security officer. Then in 2012, Rice became supervisory special agent of the counterintelligence and technical programs in St. Louis.

He also served as the crisis management coordinator and led a year-long active shooter training initiative in St. Louis.

In 2015, Rice was promoted to assistant section chief in the Counterintelligence Division at FBI headquarters, where he created the first joint operational section between the Cyber and Counterintelligence Divisions.

In 2016, Rice became assistant special agent in charge of the Counterintelligence and Cyber Division in the Los Angeles Field Office and was in charge of the West Covina Resident Agency.

Rice was promoted in 2018 to section chief in the Counterintelligence Division at headquarters and led several joint operations with USIC partners. 

In 2019, he became deputy assistant director of the Enterprise Cybersecurity Office in the Information Technology Branch at headquarters.

At Eastern Kentucky University, Rice received a bachelor of science degree in police administration. He also earned graduate degrees in computer resources and information technology and in security management from Webster University in Missouri. 

Before joining the FBI, Rice worked in the Somerset Police Department in Kentucky.

Justin King Named Special Agent in Charge of DEA’s Omaha Division

The DEA’s Omaha Division has a new leader. 

Justin C. King has been named special agent in charge of the division, which oversees 11 offices in Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska North Dakota, and the western parts of Illinois and Wisconsin.

King replaces Richard Salter Jr., who retired from the DEA in January.

“I understand and appreciate the concerns our Midwestern communities face as we contend with the threats posed by methamphetamine, counterfeit pills, opioids and other dangerous drugs on a daily basis,” King said in a statement. “I look forward to advancing the good work our investigators are performing across Iowa, Minnesota, Nebraska, North Dakota and South Dakota and making a positive impact in our cities and rural communities.”

King’s career with the DEA began 19 years ago, when he joined the Laredo, Texas, District Office. In 2006, he was added to the DEA’s Foreign-Deployed Advisory Support Team (FAST), where he served until 2009. As a member of FAST, King participated in counter narcotics operations during three deployments to Afghanistan and one to Central America.    

In 20019, King transferred to the Oklahoma City District Office and served as a special agent and group supervisor of the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Task Force through 2014. King returned to the FAST program in August 2014 as a team leader, guiding his group on the final DEA FAST deployment to Afghanistan, in addition to training deployments in the Ukraine and Paraguay. 

In 2017, King was promoted to section chief and was tasked with the enforcement and training deployments of four FAST teams and the DEA Personal Recovery Unit. He served as executive assistant to the special agent in charge of the DEA’s Office of Training from April 2017 to January 2018.

King served three years as assistant special agent in charge of the Little Rock District Office, where he was responsible for all DEA activities in the state of Arkansas.

A native of Oklahoma, King is a veteran of the U.S. Army Infantry Branch.