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FBI

“Wearing a Wire” a Term of the Past in the Digital Era?

Undercover FBI agent Joaquin Gracia

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The times have changed.

Wendy Ruderman of New York Times reports that the digital age has made the phrase “wearing a wire” something of the past.

“In the old days, they would say, ‘Let me pat you down for a wire’ and boom, everybody would just open their shirt and say, ‘I’m not wearing a wire,’ ” retired undercover FBI agent Joaquin Garcia told the Times. “Now there is no need to wear a wire. It’s become extinct. It’s all gone digital. But what are you going to say, ‘I’m wearing digital,’ instead of ‘I’m wearing a wire’? It’s just become part of the parlance of law enforcement.”

To read the whole story, click here.

 

What We Can Do to Confront the Threat of New Designer Drugs from China

 This is the second in a two-part series.  To read the first part click here.
 
By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

Part one of this report discussed the menace of a new generation of synthetic designer drugs from China causing a public health crisis in Europe. In America, in the last two years, enterprising rogue Chinese chemists have introduced hundreds of these new chemical combinations into the market.

This plague in America is steadily growing worse.  Law enforcement and medical experts believe that the tens of thousands of reported cases in hospitals in the last year are just the tip of the iceberg. These numbers have essentially doubled just in the last year. The rate of reporting by the agencies like DAWN, which records emergency room admissions, and NFLIS, which keeps track of law enforcement laboratory tests on drugs, is a bleak harbinger of things to come.

Unless aggressive action is taken, we can expect the same panic the British are experiencing from this onslaught. On a more optimistic note, there are positive steps that can be taken and virtually all individuals and groups can have a role in this defense. This part will outline a strategy which can meet this oncoming crisis.

Parents —– Since the victims are largely teenagers living at home, the first line of defense has to be the parents. At a minimum all parents of teens and pre-teens should have a frank and two-sided conversation to educate their children on the life-threatening effects of these drugs, which are deceptively packaged and marketed as a “legal high.”

Teens think they are immortal and the prospect of some exciting new forbidden experience can be irresistible. Information and misinformation about the synthetics are spread by friends and acquaintances, and the availability is cheap and accessible. Many of these new consumers are naïve about drugs in general, as well as their dangers.

A teenage boy in North Dakota is currently facing murder charges because he gave a single tablet of a synthetic drug to a friend. The friend died shortly after ingesting it at a party. The consequences of such single acts are beyond the comprehension of most teens.

Read more »

Part 2: What We Can Do to Confront the Threat of New Designer Drugs from China

Ross Parker was chief of the criminal division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for 8 years and worked as an AUSA for 28 in that office. This is the second in a two-part series.  To read the first part, click here.
 
By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

Part one of this report discussed the menace of a new generation of synthetic designer drugs from China causing a public health crisis in Europe. In America, in the last two years, enterprising rogue Chinese chemists have introduced hundreds of these new chemical combinations into the market.

This plague in America  is steadily growing worse.  Law enforcement and medical experts believe that the tens of thousands of reported cases in hospitals in the last year are just the tip of the iceberg. These numbers have essentially doubled just in the last year. The rate of reporting by the agencies like DAWN, which records emergency room admissions, and NFLIS, which keeps track of law enforcement laboratory tests on drugs, is a bleak harbinger of things to come.

Unless aggressive action is taken, we can expect the same panic the British are experiencing from this onslaught. On a more optimistic note, there are positive steps that can be taken and virtually all individuals and groups can have a role in this defense. This part will outline a strategy which can meet this oncoming crisis.

Parents —– Since the victims are largely teenagers living at home, the first line of defense has to be the parents. At a minimum all parents of teens and pre-teens should have a frank and two-sided conversation to educate their children on the life-threatening effects of these drugs, which are deceptively packaged and marketed as a “legal high.”

Teens think they are immortal and the prospect of some exciting new forbidden experience can be irresistible. Information and misinformation about the synthetics are spread by friends and acquaintances, and the availability is cheap and accessible. Many of these new consumers are naïve about drugs in general, as well as their dangers.

A teenage boy in North Dakota is currently facing murder charges because he gave a single tablet of a synthetic drug to a friend. The friend died shortly after ingesting it at a party. The consequences of such single acts are beyond the comprehension of most teens.

Read more »

FBI Probes Release of Video Showing Rutgers Coach Shoving, Kicking Players

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The FBI is trying to determine whether a former Rutgers basketball employee tried to extort the university by threatening to release damaging videos showing ex-coach Mike Rice shoving players and calling them gay slurs, the Associated Press reports.

The former employee, Eric Murdock, quit his job last year at the basketball program’s player development director.

A lawyer for Murdock asked the university for $950,000 to avoid a lawsuit, the AP reported.

The video was released last week, and Murdock filed a whistleblower suit Friday against the university.

The video resulted in Rice’s termination and the resignation of athletic director Tim Pernetti, an assistant basketball coach and the university’s top in-house lawyer.

Family Urges FBI to Handle Fatal Shootings of Prosecutors in Texas

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Family members grieving the murder of a Texas prosecutor and his wife want the FBI to take over the investigation, KMOV 4 St. Louis reports.

Family of Mike McLelland and his wife Cynthia were fatally shot in their home March 31, two months after a prosecutor from the same office was shot to death.

The family wants the FBI to investigate all three deaths.

“The family’s pretty much at the edge of its seat with some anger at this point that more was not being done,” family spokesman Chris Heisler said. “The reward money that’s out right now is $200,000. I think that’s insignificant.”

The family wants the reward to be $1 million.

FBI Visits Home of Ex-CIA Director Petraeus As Part of Investigation into Potential Classified Leak

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Trying to determine whether his former lover mishandled classified information, FBI agents questioned former CIA Director David Petraeus at his home in the northern Virginia late last week, Reuters reports.

The FBI launched an investigation last year after it was discovered Petraeus had an extra-marital affair with his biographer, Paula Broadwell, whose handling of classified information is under question.

Agents have already seized materials from Broadwell’s home in North Carolina, Reuters reported.

According to Reuters, Petraeus and Broadwell deny mishandling classified information.

FBI Director Robert Mueller Gives Out Community Awards

 

ATF Uses Brain-Damaged Man with Low IQ to Run Drugs, Guns as Part of Federal Probe

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The ATF used a brain-damaged man with a low IQ to help to handle drug and gun deals as part of an investigation into a Milwaukee storefront, the AP reports.

The man, Chauncey Wright, was paid in cigarettes, merchandise and money, but was charged with federal drug and gun counts once the operation was done, according to the AP.

Advocates for people with disabilities said the man should be freed.

The ATF has launched an investigation.

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