Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

June 2021
S M T W T F S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



FBI

Legendary FBI Agent Mark Felt — aka “Deep Throat” — Dies at 95

Mark Felt/ photo-face the nation

Mark Felt/ photo-face the nation

A legendary newspaper source, his identity became the subject of speculation for decades.

By Patricia Sullivan and Bob Woodward
Washington Post Staff Writers
WASHINGTON — W. Mark Felt Sr., the associate director of the FBI during the Watergate scandal who, better known as “Deep Throat,” became the most famous anonymous source in American history, died yesterday. He was 95.
Felt died at 12:45 p.m. at a hospice near his home in Santa Rosa, Calif. where he had been living since August.
Felt “was fine this morning” and was “joking with his caregiver,” according to his daughter, Joan Felt. She said in a phone interview that her father ate a big breakfast before remarking that he was tired and went to sleep.
“He slipped away,” she said.
As the second-highest official in the FBI under longtime director J. Edgar Hoover and interim director L. Patrick Gray, Felt detested the Nixon administration’s attempt to subvert the bureau’s investigation into the complex of crimes and coverups known as the Watergate scandal that ultimately led to the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon.
For Full Story

Read Longer Post Version

Read New York Times Story

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y2SLvOhLGZo

Some FBI Agents in Iraq Got Overtime to Attend Parties and Watch Movies

This comes under the category of “not good publicity for the bureau.”

By LARA JAKES JORDAN
Associated Press Writer
WASHINGTON — Taxpayers were billed an average of $45,000 in overtime and extra pay for each FBI agent temporarily posted to Iraq over the course of four years, according to a new Justice Department report. In some cases, agents were paid to watch movies, exercise and attend parties.
In all, the audit by Justice Department Inspector General Glenn A. Fine found the FBI racked up $7.8 million in improper wages between 2003 and 2007.
Thursday’s report blamed a faulty FBI policy that allowed agents to claim the extra time and money. An FBI spokesman said that policy – which initially sought to enlist volunteers to go to dangerous war zones – is no longer in place.
“Several FBI employees noted that they periodically spent time during the work day washing clothes,” the report noted.

For Full Story

Read Report

Read FBI Response

FBI Says Tribune Story Didn’t Affect Timing of Gov’s Arrest

By The Wall Street Journal
Washington Wire

The timing of Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich’s arrest wasn’t affected by a Chicago Tribune story that reported Blagojevich was being secretly recorded as part of a political corruption investigation, a Federal Bureau of Investigation spokesman said. The Dec. 9 arrest, the spokesman said, had been planned before the Tribune article appeared Dec. 5.
A Washington Wire post Dec. 14 incorrectly said the Tribune article dictated the timing of the arrest. The governor faces corruption charges that include seeking a political or financial deal in exchange for an appointment to the U.S. Senate seat vacated by President-elect Barack Obama.
The FBI spokesman did not dispute that some members of U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald’s team believed the Tribune article prompted Blagojevich to cancel a meeting allegedly called to discuss trading the Senate seat for campaign contributions.

D.C. Man Charged in Historical Minnesota Fire Commits Suicide

A tragedy ends with another tragedy.

By Clarence Williams and Martin Weil
Washington Post Staff Writers
WASHINGTON –A 64-year-old Northwest Washington man who was charged with causing the largest wildfire in Minnesota in 90 years apparently shot and killed himself yesterday in his back yard.
Stephen G. Posniak, an outdoorsman, retired federal employee and former advisory neighborhood commissioner, died at his home on Windom Place, according to police sources and his lawyer.
The apparent suicide came the day after a federal magistrate judge in Minneapolis denied motions challenging key aspects of the charges filed in the 2007 Ham Lake fire, which burned for days, destroying more than 75,000 acres.
According to the Justice Department, Posniak was charged Oct. 20 in Minneapolis with setting timber afire, leaving a fire unattended and unextinguished, and giving false information to United States Forest Service officers. A trial was to begin next month.
For Full Story

Read Indictment

OTHER NEWS OF INTEREST

JetBlue a Little Blue Over Boozed-Up Passenger and Diverted Flight

Some passengers are better off sticking to Diet Coke and pretzels instead of booze — especially when it means diverting a flight.

By Associated Press
SALT LAKE CITY — The FBI says a JetBlue flight headed from New York to Burbank, Calif., landed in Salt Lake City after an intoxicated passenger caused a disruption.
The FBI’s Salt Lake office says about 130 passengers and crew got off of Flight 359 in Salt Lake late Monday night and were re-screened.
Read More

Recent Court Documents

 

FBI Blagojevich Tapes and Transcripts

Tape 1Transcript
Tape 2Transcript
Tape 3Transcript
Tape 4Transcript


Chicago FBI Agent Shoots Bank Robbery Suspect Who Tries to Run Him Over

As if there wasn’t enough wild and crazy stuff happening in this town. Here’s the latest — a distraction to the Gov. Blagojevich scandal.

FROM STNG WIRE REPORTS
CHICAGO — A man suspected of robbing a bank in the Uptown neighborhood Monday morning was shot and seriously wounded by an FBI agent downtown near Loyola University’s campus just off of Michigan Avenue when he tried to run over another FBI agent.
Paramedics responded to 111 E. Pearson St. about 10:40 a.m. for a reported shooting, according to Fire Media Affairs Asst. Director Eve Rodriguez.
The suspect had robbed a TCF Bank branch earlier Monday morning in the 4300 block of North Sheridan Road and was tracked to the 800 block of North Michigan Avenue, according to the FBI.
After a short foot chase, the suspect was apprehended, according to a release from the FBI. While he was being taken into custody, the man somehow managed to get behind the wheel of an FBI vehicle, then tried to run over one of the arresting FBI agents with that car, the release said. A second FBI agent, fearing for his partner’s safety, fired one round from his service weapon into the car, striking the suspect.
One person was taken from the scene in serious condition to Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Rodriguez said.
No bystanders or FBI agents were injured in the incident, the release said.
For Full Story

National Lampoon Executive Charged With Stock Fraud: And That’s No Joke

Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

For National Lampoon , the purveyor of humor, which owns interest in such classic films as Animal House, Monday was no laughing matter.
The company’s chief Executive Daniel Laikin, 46, was among seven people charged in a stock fraud scheme that involved National Lampoon and two other companies that artificially inflated stock prices, according to the U.S. Attorney’s office in Philadelphia.
The investigation, which included the Security Exchange Commission, involved a government undercover “cooperating witness” who was paid a kickback by the defendants to make purchases in the “targeted stock with the objective of artificially inflating it’s value,” the U.S. Attorney’s office said.
According to the charges against National Lampoon’s Laikin, between March and June 2008,  Laikin conspired with a company consultant to pay people, including the government informant, to artificially inflate the price of National Lampoon stock.
One of the people they paid enlisted a Rochester, N.Y. stock promoter who was given about $40,000 to make purchases of National Lampoon stock with the intent to drive up share price, the U.S. Attorneys office said.
Laikin indicated that he wanted the stock to rise from $2 per share to $5 to make it more attractive for strategic partnerships and acquisitions, authorities said. Three of the defendants in Monday’s  case were directly tied to National Lampoon. Others were linked to Advatech Corp of West Palm Beach or Swedish Vegas Inc., of Arcadia, California, authorities said.
Janice K. Fedarcyk, special agent in charge of the FBI in Philadelphia said in a prepared statement that the defendants “defrauded all of the legitimate market investors who bought and sold shares in these companies. The entire investment market suffers when individuals violate legal and fiduciary trust of their positions.”
Marcy Goot, a spokewoman for National Lampoon in Los Angeles, could not be reached immediately for comment.