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FBI

Ex-N.Y. State Sen. Majority Leader Joseph Bruno Indicted

Joseph Bruno/cbs photo

Joseph Bruno/cbs photo

BY GLENN BLAIN
DAILY NEWS ALBANY BUREAU
ALBANY –Former State Senate Majority Leader Joseph Bruno was indicted Friday on charges of pocketing at least $3 million by steering contracts to select businesses.
Bruno, who retired from the Legislature in July after more than 32 years in office, was charged in an eight-count indictment with taking defrauding the public from 1993 to at least 2006.
Bruno revealed more than a year ago that the FBI was investigating his private business dealings. He has consistently denied wrongdoing.
Bruno appeared in federal court to plead not guilty.
For Full Story

Internet Child Porn Cases Creates Backlog in FBI Computer Lab

If press releases are any measure, the federal government is being inundated with child porn cases. The Internet, for all its greatness, has created a nightmare in the area of child porn.

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON – The FBI’s stepped-up effort to fight Internet child pornography has led to an evidence backlog in the bureau’s computer labs, auditors said Friday.
The Justice Department’s inspector general said the number of such cases handled by the FBI rose more than 20-fold between the 1996 and 2007 budget years. As a result, the heavy volume meant it took an average of about two months to examine such evidence in 2007 – and even as long as nine months.
The FBI, which has built a new lab in Maryland to handle the increased demand, agreed with the inspector general’s recommendations to create deadlines to reduce the backlog.
For Full Story

Chicago Cop Pleads In Fed Court To Beating Handcuffed Man In Wheelchair

In a department that has had its fair share of negative publicity, this can’t help.

BY FRAN MAIN
Chicago Sun-Times
CHICAGO — A Chicago Police officer pleaded guilty today to a civil rights violation for beating a 60-year-old man who was handcuffed and shackled to a wheelchair.
“I lost it,” Officer William Cozzi admitted in federal court.
The government is seeking a sentence of six to eight years for the 51-year-old officer.
Cozzi previously was convicted on a state charge of misdemeanor battery and sentenced to 18 months’ probation.
After the Chicago Sun-Times obtained a videotape of the beating, police Supt. Jody Weis referred the case to the FBI for federal prosecution.
For Full Story

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QEsv8tkFpKI&eurl=http://www.suntimes.com/news/24-7/1392478,william-cozzi-guilty-wheelchair-beating-012209.article&feature=player_embedded

Judge Changes Mind: Atty. Gen. Mukasey Won’t Have To Give Sworn Statement In Messy Stevens Case

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens

Atty. Gen. Mukasey got a reprieve from the a federal judge. Still, the Sen. Stevens case is not looking good for the governor. It’s hard to believe the judge won’t at least call for a new trial.

By The Anchorage Daily News
WASHINGTON — The judge in Ted Stevens’ false-disclosure case reversed himself Wednesday and said neither the attorney general nor any other top level Justice Department official would be required to give a sworn statement about an Anchorage FBI agent’s whistle-blower complaint.
Instead, U.S. District Judge Emmet Sullivan ordered in Washington that the Justice Department’s Public Integrity Section provide him and Stevens’ lawyers with all its communications related to the agent’s complaint. The material, due Jan. 29, will be filed under seal, Sullivan ruled, preventing public disclosure.
The FBI complaint, by agent Chad Joy, has clouded Stevens’ conviction on seven counts of failing to disclose gifts and services over six years. Joy alleged that the public corruption investigation in Alaska was tainted by another agent’s improper source handling, and that prosecutors in Stevens’ trial knowingly withheld evidence that Stevens was entitled to see.
For Full Story

FBI Cared More What George Carlin Said About Hoover than Dirty Words

It seems in the end it often came back to J. Edgar Hoover, a man with a lot of power and a healthy ego.

By John Rogers
Associated Press
LOS ANGELES – Talk about irony. Comedian George Carlin spent decades pushing the bounds of free speech by saying the seven words you can never say on television, but not one of them made it into an FBI file on him.
Among the 12 pages that do make up a file recently released by Carlin’s family are a couple of letters from outraged citizens who complained that the “alleged comedian” had made fun of the FBI and its director, J. Edgar Hoover, during TV appearances in 1969 and 1970.
There’s also a letter from Hoover himself thanking one of Carlin’s critics for defending his honor, and an internal FBI memo that quotes the director as asking: “What do we know of Carlin?”
Not much, as it turned out. The memo notes the FBI has “no data concerning Carlin” other than the two letters from his critics.
For Full Story

FBI May Have Recorded Up to 50 Conversations Between Gov. Blagojevich and Brother

It appears Gov. Rod Blagojevich isn’t the only family member facing more embarrassing moments. The FBI apparently recorded dozens of conversations between the Gov and his brother Robert.

BY NATASHA KORECKI
Chicago Sun-Times
Gov. Blagojevich

Gov. Blagojevich

CHICAGO — The governor’s brother, Robert Blagojevich, now says he was probably caught on secret government wiretaps as many as 50 times.
In a court filing today, his lawyer Michael Ettinger said he might seek to have all of those secret tapes kept out of court but needs more information before he decides to do so.
Prosecutors have sought to make one of the recordings involving Robert Blagojevich public at the upcoming Senate impeachment trial of his brother, Gov. Blagojevich. Ettinger and Ed Genson, one of the governor’s lawyers, oppose their release and have said they might seek to suppress all of the secret recordings.
A judge had asked to hear the reasons for throwing out the recordings before deciding whether to release some of them for the impeachment trial.
For Full Story
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Law Enforcement Pleasantly Surprised: No Inauguration Related Arrests

white house photo
white house photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com
WASHINGTON – My what a difference four years makes.
At the last presidential inauguration in 2005, when President Bush was being sworn in for a second term, about 20 people were arrested. What’s more, D.C. police reported that 10 of its officers were injured after clashing with anti-war demonstrators.
Tuesday was a much different story.
Federal and local law enforcement in Washington said there were no inauguration-related arrests, which surprised many considering the crowd. Estimates were as high as about 2 million.
Paul Bresson, an FBI spokesman, called the no-arrest event “a very good day for law enforcement”. D.C. police and U.S. Secret Service echoed similar sentiments Wednesday afternoon.
Meanwhile, on Tuesday the Secret Service unveiled its much anticipated new armored presidential limousine.
“Although many of the vehicles’ security enhancements cannot be discussed, it is safe to say that this car’s security and coded communications systems make it the most technologically advanced protection vehicle in the world,” Nicholas Trotta, Assistant Director for the Office of Protective Operations, said in a prepared statement before the car was unveiled.

Feds Charging Moms and Others With Terrorism Aboard Planes

Is an irate mother aboard a plane who spanks her child a terrorist? Are the feds going too far charging people on planes with acts of terrorism? Could be.

By Ralph Vartabedian and Peter Pae
Los Angeles Times
Reporting from Los Angeles and Oklahoma City — Tamera Jo Freeman was on a Frontier Airlines flight to Denver in 2007 when her two children began to quarrel over the window shade and then spilled a Bloody Mary into her lap.
She spanked each of them on the thigh with three swats. It was a small incident, but one that in the heightened anxiety after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks would eventually have enormous ramifications for Freeman and her children.
A flight attendant confronted Freeman, who responded by hurling a few profanities and throwing what remained of a can of tomato juice on the floor.
The incident aboard the Frontier flight ultimately led to Freeman’s arrest and conviction for a federal felony defined as an act of terrorism under the Patriot Act, the controversial federal law enacted after the 2001 attacks in New York and Washington.
“I had no idea I was breaking the law,” said Freeman, 40, who spent three months in jail before pleading guilty.
For Full Story

Read Tamera Jo Freeman Criminal Complaint

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