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FBI

FBI Investigated Michael Jackson in 2 Child Molestation Cases, New Files Show

Michael Jackson file/fbi art

Michael Jackson file/fbi art

NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

By Larry McShane
New York Daily News

The FBI investigated Michael Jackson in a pair of child molestation cases 11 years apart – with neither ever going to trial, according to explosive new documents made public Tuesday.

The first case dated to September 1993, when the FBI’s Los Angeles field office was notified by the Los Angeles Police Department that Jackson was under investigation in a molestation case.

An FBI document at the time said there was a probe involving “Jackson concerning the transportation of a minor across state lines.”

Federal prosecutors opted not to prosecute Jackson under the Mann Act and even declined to attend a meeting about the allegation, according to the documents.

For Full NY Daily News Story

NEW YORK POST

By JANON FISHER, JEANE MacINTOSH and KATE SHEEHY
New York Post

NEW YORK — An explosive dossier that the FBI kept on Michael Jackson and released today show he had once been allegedly accused of molesting two Mexico boys in the mid-1980s but that the case was supposedly covered up.

An unnamed source told the FBI that while researching a book he was writing about Jackson, he was informed that the agency had investigated the charge in 1985 or 1986.

But the case wasn’t pursued because “Jackson was to receive an honor at the White House from the president,” the person said he was told. He added that his source insisted to him, “The investigation was covered up.”

To Read More of the NY Post Story

FBI files from 1992-1993 (PDF, 196 pages)

FBI files from Sept. 1993 to Aug. 1994 (PDF, 56 pages)

FBI files from Sept. 1993 to Oct. 1993 (PDF, 9 pages)

FBI files from Oct. 1995 to Jan. 1997 (PDF, 8 pages)

FBI files from Jan. 2004 to April 2004 (PDF, 41 pages)

FBI files from Sept. 2004 to Dec. 2004 (PDF, 5 pages)

FBI files from March 2004 to June 2005 (PDF, 18 pages)

FBI About to Release Michael Jackson Files: Tabloids Salivating

michael-jackson
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — You can already hear the tabloids salivating over the anticipated release of FBI files on legendary singer Michael Jackson.

The Daily Mail in London was among many media outlets to report that the FBI plans to declassify and release more than 300 documents on Jackson within the next two days.

The London publication reported that the files will include info on Jackson’s child molestation allegations in 1993 and 2004.

The paper reported that the FBI had a 679-page file, but only about half will be released.

FBI Reports Drop in Murder, Rape, Robbery in First Half of 2009

FBI graphic

FBI graphic

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The number of crimes involving violence, property and arson dropped in the first half of 2009 compared to the same time last year,  according to the FBI’s Preliminary Semiannual Uniform Crime Report released Monday.

The FBI said it was the third year in a row crime had declined during that six month stretch.

The latest report, which compares January-June 2009 to the same period in 2008, showed that violent crime dropped 4.4 percent while property crime dropped 6.1 percent and arson declined 8.2 percent.

More specifically, the FBI reported that murders were down 10 percent, rape down 3.3. percent and robberies fell 6.5 percent.

Other highlights were cited in an FBI press release:

* Murder was lower in all four regions of the country, with the largest decreases in the Northeast (13.7 percent) and the West (13.3 percent).

Read more »

Job Applicant Asks if Flunking FBI Polygraph Will Hurt Chances With Justice Dept.

polygraphBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Can flunking an FBI job entrance exam hurt your chances of getting another government job?

Derrick T. Dortch, president of Derrick T. Dortch, president of the Diversa Group, a career counselor who specializes in government job searches and military transition, answered  “no” during a recent chat at washingtonpost.com.

Here’s how the conversation went:

Question: “I just had an interview with the Board of Immigration Appeals in the Department of Justice, and I am still waiting for the results. I have a question about clearance matters. I also applied to be an FBI special agent, and although I made it through the selection process, I failed the polygraph examination. Do you think this will count against me if I get the BIA position?”

Derrick Dortch: “I am sorry to hear about the polygraph. The FBI’s polygraph process is a very stressful one, so don’t be too discouraged. Keep on applying to federal positions as you are doing. Now in terms of the polygraph and the DOJ, it should not be held against you. Most DOJ positions, aside from those in the FBI and a few other areas, do not require you to take a polygraph exam.”

Ticklethewire.com Reader Responds About Reliability of Polygraph

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Ex-Secret Service Dir. Accuses FBI of “Abuse of Power” in Clinton-Lewinski Probe

In Washington, rivalries between federal law enforcement agencies aren’t all that unusual. This certainly won’t help.

Bill Clinton/pres. library photo

Bill Clinton/pres. library photo

By PETER BAKER
New York Times

WASHINGTON — A former director of the Secret Service said Friday that the F.B.I. had engaged in an “abuse of power” by trying to pressure him to “give us the president” during the investigation of President Bill Clinton’s interactions with Monica Lewinsky a decade ago.

The official, Lewis C. Merletti, who headed the former president’s protective detail and later became the agency’s director, said in an interview that the Federal Bureau of Investigation had grilled him just days before Mr. Clinton left office in a last-ditch effort to prove that his agents had covered up and even facilitated extramarital flings.

Lewis Merletti/ipsa photo

Lewis Merletti/ipsa photo

Mr. Merletti said that the F.B.I. alleged that he and Mr. Clinton had concocted this deal: in exchange for Mr. Merletti’s stonewalling questions about Ms. Lewinsky, Mr. Clinton would not only appoint him director of the Secret Service but would also provide him women for sexual encounters.

“They said to me, ‘You’re the last person who can give us the president, and you’re going to give him to us,’ ” Mr. Merletti recalled. He called it “disgraceful” and said of the F.B.I., “They became involved in a political game, and in the end they tarnished themselves beyond belief.”

For Full Story

Muslims Complain that FBI Tactics Stir Resentment and Tension

The tensions between the FBI and the Muslim American community may never totally vanish. But both sides need one another and it would be beneficial to improve relations.

mosque

By PAUL VITELLO and KIRK SEMPLE
New York Times

The anxiety and anger have been building all year. In March, a national coalition of Islamic organizations warned that it would cease cooperating with the F.B.I. unless the agency stopped infiltrating mosques and using “agents provocateurs to trap unsuspecting Muslim youth.”

In September, a cleric in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, sued the government, claiming that the F.B.I. had threatened to scuttle his application for a green card unless he agreed to spy on relatives overseas — echoing similar claims made in recent court cases in California, Florida and Massachusetts.

And last month, after an imam in Queens was charged with aiding what the authorities called a bomb-making plot, a group of South Asian Muslims there began compiling a database of complaints about their brushes with counterterrorism investigators.

For Full Story

Read Story on Arrests in Pakistan and Muslim American-FBI Relations

ATF, FBI and D.C. Cops Bust 44 in Undercover Sting Targeting Guns and Drugs

It’s been a while since we’ve heard of any law enforcement operations setting up a sting like this.

gun

By Clarence Williams
Washington Post Staff Writer

WASHINGTON — D.C. police and federal agents announced Thursday the arrest of more than 40 people on felony weapons and drug charges as the result of a seven-month undercover operation.

Investigators from the D.C. Police Narcotics and Special Investigations Division led the sting, in which undercover officers posed as drug and gun buyers inside a Northeast Washington auto body shop. Police said confidential informants brought dozens of men willing to sell illegal goods at EB Autobody, the phony business set up by police in June.

“This was the most successful operation like this that we have done in Washington, D.C., since the 1970s,” Police Chief Cathy L. Lanier said at a news conference.

For Full Story

Death of Mexican “Boss of Bosses” Drug Cartel Kingpin Won’t Spell the End

DEA's Michele Leonhart/dea photo

DEA's Michele Leonhart/dea photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The death on Wednesday of Mexican drug kingpin Arturo Beltran Leyva, who claimed to be the “boss of bosses”, may be a big victory for the Mexican and American governments, but it certainly won’t spell the end to the violent grip the cartels have on the country.

In fact, it could end up creating a power struggle that may only mean more violence.

“It’s an important step but, at the end of the day, you’re not going to reduce the market,” Alberto Islas, a Mexico City-based security analyst told the Los Angeles Times. “You take out one guy and somebody else will take his place. But this is violent.”

Mexican and American officials hailed the death of the kingpin, who was fatally shot during an intense gunfight with Mexican naval commandos.

“This action represents an important achievement for the people and government of Mexico and a heavy blow against one of the most dangerous criminal organizations in Mexico,” President Felipe Calderon said, according to the Times.

“His death has dealt a crippling blow to one of the most violent cartels in the world,” said Michele Leonhart, acting director of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.

To Read the full Los Angeles Times Story click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST