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FBI

Jury to Decide Whether Prosthetic Hand Made Man Unfit for FBI in Discrimination Suit

Justin Slaby

 
Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Was a former Army Ranger who had his hand blown off in a training accident unsuitable for the FBI?

A jury is expected to make that decision today in the discrimination case filed by Justin Slaby, who said he was ejected from an FBI training academy after authorities learned he had a prosthetic arm, The Wall Street Journal reports.

Slaby attempted to show in court that his disabled hand was as capable to fire a weapon and perform other duties as a real hand.

FBI instructors and trainers said Slaby was unable to safely fire a gun, a claim that Slaby denies.

Slaby said after the trial that he’s remaining strong.

“I have no emotions or feelings right now, I’m just kind of focused,” he told a reporter. “I’ve been continually thinking that it’s amazing this had to come this far. It didn’t need to happen.”

Head of U.S. Border Patrol in Blaine Was Removed from His Position

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

John C. Bates, the head of the U.S. Border Patrol’s Blaine Sector, was removed from his post Monday after serving for six years as chief patrol agent for the sector, the Bellingham Herald reports.

The reason, however, remained a mystery this morning after authorities declined to say what happened.

Bates was in charge of protecting the borders of Washington, Alaska and Oregon.

He had been with the agency since 1985.

Blaine is the second leader to be removed from the Blaine sector in the last five years. A deputy chief was arrested for having sex with an underage girl, according to the Bellingham Herald.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Robert Foley, Head of FBI’s Detroit Office, is Stepping Down Because of Family Illness

Robert Foley/fbi photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Detroit’s FBI Special Agent in Charge Robert Foley, whose family home was custom built in the Motor City when he took the job nearly a year ago, told the Detroit Free Press today that he is stepping down.

But the East Coast native isn’t leaving the FBI; he’s taking a job fighting public corruption in Florida, the Free Press reported.

Foley, whose career with the FBI spans 17 years, said his move was prompted by a recent health issue in his family. He said he’s moving to Florida because he has a lot of family support there.

“I fell in love with the people, their worth ethic, their strength,” Foley told the Free Press of Detroiters. “Despite the many challenging economic issues here … Detroit will turn around. It’s a place full of hope, inspiration and hard work that will get it to turn around.”

New Documentary on JFK Assassination Suggests Secret Service Accidentally Shot JFK

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The endless search for answers in the JFK assassination was the impetus for yet another film.

“JFK: The Smoking Gun” pursues this question: Did a Secret Service Agent accidentally shoot President Kennedy in Dallas in November of 1963?

The docudrama that will air on ReelzChannel is based on the book, “Mortal Error: The Shot That Killed JFK,” reports the Associated Press.

The film suggests that agent George Hickey was driving behind the president when he accidentally shot the president after Lee Harvey Oswald fire his first shot.

“What we’re saying is that we believe it was a tragic accident in the heat of that moment,” McLaren told the Television Critics Association on Sunday.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST


Closing Arguments to Begin in Murder, Racketeering Trial of ‘Whitey’ Bulger

Whitey Bulger/fbi

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The murder and racketeering case against accused mobster James ‘Whitey” Bulger may have reached its final days as prosecutors and defense attorneys prepare to present lengthy closing arguments today, the Associated Press wrote.

The nearly eight-week trial will give way to closing arguments after jurors heard testimony about 19 killings in which Bulger is accused of being involved.

It has been a long time coming. The 83-year-old man fled Boston ahead of an indictment, and he remained one of the most wanted fugitives until he was found in California in 2011.

Judge Denise Casper has given each side three hours and 15 minutes to present closing arguments.

The jury is expected to begin deliberating Tuesday.

Report: FBI Background Checks Are Riddled with Inaccuracies That Cost People Jobs

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

As employers increasingly rely on FBI background checks before hiring prospective employees, a new report shows the process is riddled with errors and omissions, The Columbus Dispatch reports.

The report from the Employment Law Project estimates that 1.8 million workers are subjected to faulty background checks.

“As millions of workers struggle to navigate a still-challenging job market, the FBI must avoid creating wrongful barriers that cause unnecessary job loss and financial harm,” the report’s authors wrote. “The FBI is more than a mere receptacle of information; the imprimatur of the FBI marks the records as authoritative and trustworthy.”

That’s not good news for the increasing number of people who are subjected to FBI background checks. In the past decade, the number increased six times to 17 million last year.

USA Today Exclusive: FBI Allowed Informants to Commit 5,600 Crimes

By Brad Heath
USA Today

WASHINGTON — The FBI gave its informants permission to break the law at least 5,658 times in a single year, according to newly disclosed documents that show just how often the nation’s top law enforcement agency enlists criminals to help it battle crime.

The U.S. Justice Department ordered the FBI to begin tracking crimes by its informants more than a decade ago, after the agency admitted that its agents had allowed Boston mobster James “Whitey” Bulger to operate a brutal crime ring in exchange for information about the Mafia. The FBI submits that tally to top Justice Department officials each year, but has never before made it public.

Agents authorized 15 crimes a day, on average, including everything from buying and selling illegal drugs to bribing government officials and plotting robberies. FBI officials have said in the past that permitting their informants — who are often criminals themselves — to break the law is an indispensable, if sometimes distasteful, part of investigating criminal organizations.

To read the full story click here.

Ex-F.B.I. Agent Is Charged In Plot to Sell Documents


Robert Lustyik Jr.

By Benjamin Weiser
New York Times
A former F.B.I. special agent has been accused of conspiring to sell confidential bureau documents to a Bangladeshi man who was seeking to harm the reputation of a political rival in his native country, authorities said Friday

The former agent, Robert Lustyik, was with the Federal Bureau of Investigation in late 2011 when he began plotting with a friend, Johannes Thaler, according to a criminal complaint unsealed on Friday in Federal District Court in White Plains, N.Y.

“I will work my magic …. We r sooooooo close,” Agent Lustyik wrote in an exchange of text messages with Mr. Thaler, the complaint said.

“I know,” Mr. Thaler replied. “It’s all right here in front of us. Pretty soon we’ll be having lunch in our oceanfront restaurant.”

To read full story click here.

 

Read the press release