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FBI’s Long Arm Nabs Pirate Negotiator in Somalia


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The long arm of the FBI reached into Somalia and plucked out a man suspected of being the chief negotiator for a group of pirates who hijacked an American yacht in February and ultimately killed all four people aboard, authorities announced Wednesday.

Mohammad Saaili Shibin, who worked ashore as the pirates held the people hostage, was arrested  in a joint effort with the FBI and Somali government.  He was indicted in Norfolk, Va.

“The arrest of Mohammad Shibin is a significant breakthrough in the United States’ battle against Somali pirates,” said U.S. Attorney Neil H. MacBride said Wednesday. “Today marks the first time that the U.S. government has captured and charged an alleged pirate in a leadership role—a hostage negotiator who operated in Somalia.”

“As 14 heavily armed men holed-up aboard the Quest, Mohammad Shibin allegedly worked behind the scenes determining exactly how much cash could be extorted for the Americans’ safe release,” said New York’s FBI Assistant Director in Charge Janice K. Fedarcyk.

Fourteen others who hijacked the SV/Quest yacht have been indicted in the matter and are awaiting trial, which is set for Nov. 29.

The indictment alleges that during the negotiations, Shibin was on land conducting research on the Internet to learn about the hostages on the yacht and figure out the appropriate ransom demand, authorities said.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

2 New Orleans Cops Convicted in 2005 Beating Death of Civilian


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

More unflattering news about New Orleans cops.

Two New Orleans cops were convicted Wednesday in U.S. District Court in New Orleans of civil rights and obstruction of justice violations in the July 30, 2005 beating death of a civilian Raymond Robair and the cover up, the Justice Department announced. Sentencing was set for July 14.

Authorities said Officer Melvin Williams was convicted of beating of the citizen. Several witnesses testified in trial that they saw Williams kick Robair in the side and beat him repeatedly with a baton.

Afterward the beating, Officer Williams and Officer Matthew Dean Moore placed Robair, who was unconscious, into a police car, authorities said. They then drove him to Charity Hospital in New Orleans and told the hospital that they had found Robair under a bridge and he was a drug user.  As a result, the hospital treated him for a drug overdose rather than blunt for trauma, and he died, authorities said.

Williams was also convicted along with  Officer Matthew Dean Moore “of obstructing justice by writing and submitting a false and inaccurate incident report regarding their interactions with Robair. Moore was also convicted of one additional felony count for making false statements regarding the incident to FBI agents in March 2010.”

“Every community relies upon their police officers to protect and serve, but these officers abused their power, violating the law and the public trust,” said Thomas E. Perez, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division. “I am hopeful that today’s verdict brings a measure of justice to the victim’s family and the entire community.”

Column: Barry Bonds Fed Trial About “America’s Discomfort With Prominent, Powerful, Wealthy Black Men”

Editors Note: The jury in the Bond’s case begins its fourth day of deliberations on Wednesday. He faces charges of making false statements to a grand jury about steroid use and obstruction of justice.

By WILLIAM C. RHODEN
The New York Times

The trial of Barry Bonds has always been more than a simple case of pursuing a bad guy and proving that he lied. The chase and the subsequent trial have been as much about a baseball era driven by vanity and greed, and fueled by performance-enhancing drugs.

But the eight-year pursuit of Bonds also reflects America’s discomfort with prominent, powerful, wealthy black men.

That might seem like an incredible statement to make in a nation that elected Barack Obama as its first black president. But Obama, who has had his citizenship questioned and has been heckled by a member of Congress, has a place among men including Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Muhammad Ali and Bonds.

In good conscience one could never put Bonds on par with Ali or Robeson and certainly not with the president of the United States.

Bonds’s historical antecedent is Jack Johnson, who became the first black heavyweight champion in 1908.

Johnson lived a fast, unapologetic lifestyle. He incensed some blacks and enraged many whites by openly keeping company exclusively with white prostitutes and marrying at least one.

To read more click here.

Ex-FBI Agent Responds to Column

Greg Stejskal served as an FBI agent for 31 years and retired as resident agent in charge of the Ann Arbor office. He writes a column for ticklethewire.com. Stejskal sent this response to William Rhoden and shared it with ticklethewire.com. The response below by Alan Gershel was also sent to Rhoden and shared with ticklethewire.com.

The author (right) Greg Stejskal and University of Michigan coach Bo Schembechler

By Greg Stejskal

I generally agree with your premise about the prosecution of Barry Bonds as a misuse of money, but I think it’s a bit of a stretch to compare the Bonds prosecution to that of Jack Johnson.

If Bonds did lie to the Grand Jury, it is a felony and arguably the Grand Jury process would not be viable if witnesses were allowed to lie under oath with impunity.

There is precedent for such prosecutions of perjury in similar circumstances. In the Michigan Fab 5 case, only Chris Webber, of all the University of Michigan players who testified, lied about having received money from Eddie Martin. Those that admitted having received the money were not prosecuted. Webber was prosecuted for perjury and he ultimately pleaded to a felony.

In the FBI steroid case (Equine) I was involved in, we did not pursue users no matter whether they were high-profile athletes. We focused only on the dealers, but at the culmination of the case in 1994, I warned MLB (Major League Baseball) about the problem and was ignored.

I’ve often wondered if we shouldn’t have prosecuted some of the athletes. In the long run it might have avoided some of these problems.

I wrote a piece about why Roger Clemens should be prosecuted. Despite what you say about that prosecution being forced on the Department of Justice, I think the arguments I make apply to both cases.   (Here’s a column I wrote on the steroid problem and Clemens)

Ex-Federal Prosecutor Alan Gershel Also Responds

Alan Gershel worked for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for nearly 30 years, and was chief of the Criminal Division from 1989 to 2008. He is currently a full-time professor at the Thomas M. Cooley Law School in Auburn Hills, Mi.

Alan Gershel/cooley law school photo

By Alan Gershel

Dear Mr. Rhoden: as a former federal prosecutor, I read your article regarding the prosecution of Barry Bonds with great interest. You have stated that Barry Bonds was prosecuted for his “unlikability” and that the government’s effort”was a colossal misuse of time and money…”

You also seem to suggest that protecting a grand jury investigation is an “altruistic goal” not worth pursuing. I respectfully disagree. The prosecution of Barry Bonds is eminently justifiable.

A grand jury investigation is a search for the truth. Its success depends almost entirely on witnesses, who have been placed under oath and who are advised of the consequences should they fail to do so, telling the

truth. Perjurious testimony is an anathema to a search for the truth.

I am assuming we can agree that the nature and scope of the government’s investigation was a serious and legitimate one. If you do concur, then witnesses who may have information regarding the use of illegal performance enhancing drugs in Major League Baseball are legitimate witnesses. Once called and placed under oath, they cannot intentionally lie with impunity.This is what the prosecution is about.

It is not about the personality or race of Mr. Bonds. To have ignored his alleged false testimony, would have been giving Mr. Bonds favorable treatment because of his celebrity or the government’s fear of controversy. An unacceptable result, assuming there was sufficient evidence to prosecute.

Finally, an important deterrent message flows from a case of this nature that hopefully will have an impact on future investigations.

Tall Order: FBI Officials Try to Recruit an NBA Forward

Gerald Wallace/wikipedia

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The FBI knows about good public relations. Portland, Ore., is a case in point.

The TV station FOX 12 in Portland reports that FBI agents showed up to a Portland Trailblazer basketball practice in suburban Portland this week to reach out to player Gerald Wallace, 28,  as a potential recruit and remind him to keep the bureau in mind.

The station reported that when the 6- foot 7 forward arrived in Portland “he mentioned he’d like to join the FBI when he gets done in the NBA.”

So, special agent in charge Art Balizan, assistant special agent in charge Alan Peters, public affairs specialist Beth Anne Steele and retired Portland FBI agents Bob Hanis and Dick Bittner showed up, the station reported, and gave Wallace an official FBI hat, sweatshirt and honorary badge.

The station reported that the agents also gave Wallace some information about joining.

The station reported that new agents must between 23 and 37 and have a four year degree and working experience.

FBI Document Raises Questions About Authenticity Of Nazi ID in Demjanjuk Trial

simon wiesenthal center

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

An FBI report is creating a major stir for the Ukranian-born John Demjanjuk, who is on trial in Germany for Nazi war crimes.

The Associated Press reported that a newly declassified FBI document from 1985 raises questions about the authenticity of a Nazi ID card that shows Demjanjuk, 90, served at the Sobibor death camp in Nazi-occupied Poland.  The ID is considered a key piece of evidence. Demjanjuk has denied the allegations of war crimes that center around murders at the camp.

The FBI report suggests the Soviets may have forged the ID.

AP reported that defense attorney Ulrich Busch gave the AP story on Tuesday to the judges in the Munich trial and said he wants them to suspend the trial to give him time to look into the matter. The judges made no immediate ruling.

The story shows “prosecutors did not introduce all the possibly exculpatory evidence from the United States here,” Busch told the court, according to AP.

Prosecutor Hans-Joachim Lutz told the court the card has been examined by several experts who insist it is genuine.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

FBI Intercepted 30,000 Phone Calls in NY Public Corruption Probe

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

That’s a whole lot of chatter.

The New York Daily News reports that the FBI intercepted 30,000 phone calls in a corruption probe involving N.Y. state Sen. Carl Kruger, who is charged with allegedly taking $1 million in bribes to help a developer, a lobbyist and two hospital execs.

The feds also indicted Brooklyn Democrat Assemblyman William Boyland and six others on corruption charges, the Daily News reported.

Prosecutors said Kruger often spoke cryptically,according to the Daily News. He was overhead on a wiretap saying he was “anti-mail … emails are never innocuous … even the weather report.”

FBI Commemorates Deadly 1986 Shootout That Killed 2 Agents and Wounded 5 Others

FBI Dir. Robert Mueller/fbi file photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III and former director William Webster were among several hundred law enforcement folks who gathered in North Miami Beach Monday to commemorate the 25th anniversary of one of the most horrific events in the agency’s history that ended with two agents dead and another five wounded, the Associated Press reported.

The incident happened in Miami when William Webster headed up the FBI, and resulted in the agency using more powerful weapons and taking other action to better prepare agents for potentially deadly confrontations, AP reported. Agents Benjamin P. Grogan and Jerry Dove were killed.

Others attending the ceremony included  retired agent John F. Hanlon Jr. who was wounded in the incident, AP reported.

“I’m very, very proud of what we did that day. We all did our duty. And we did the best we could,” Hanlon said, according to the AP. “They laid down their lives gallantly for their country.”

On April 11, 1986, the FBI agents tracked down two bank robbers who were responsible for shooting several guards. They forced the robbers in a car  to pull over.

The robbers opened fire with a shotgun and a .223-cal. Ruger Mini-14 rifle, “which packed more power and carried more ammunition than anything the agents had,” AP reported. “Some had semiautomatic handguns and one had a 12-gauge shotgun, but many only were armed only with difficult-to-reload revolvers. Only two wore body armor, and even that wasn’t strong enough to stop the rifle’s rounds.”

Five other agents were shot and wounded including Edmundo Mireles Jr., who shot and killed both suspects, AP reported.

Mueller described the shootout as “one of the most difficult and dangerous days in the history of the bureau,” AP reported.

Since 1925, 36 FBI agents have been killed in the line of duty, AP reported.

FBI Investigating Head of ICE in Fla. For Child Porn