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FBI Suspects Mobster “Whitey” Bulger is in Europe

Boston Mobster Whitey Bulger

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The FBI suspects that Top Ten Fugitive, Boston mobster James “Whitey” Bulger is hiding out in Europe, Time magazine reports.

A team of investigators are ” keeping a close eye on Europe,” Time reported. “The team has an idea of which country Bulger is possibly in but won’t say for fear of alerting him.”

Bulger, who is a suspect in 19 murders, was last spotted in London in 2002 by a businessman at the gym of the Meridien Hotel in the city’s Piccadilly Circus, Time reported.

Bulger has been on the lam for about 15 years. The FBI is offering a $2 million reward for his arrest.

The magazine reported that Bulger told people one day he expected to be on the lam.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

FOREIGN CORRUPT PRACTICE ACT STORIES OF INTEREST

Agents’ Opinions Range from Good to Bad to Mixed on FBI Dir. Robert Mueller Getting 2-Year Extension

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Nearly everyone in the FBI can agree they were caught off guard by President Obama’s announcement Thursday that he would seek to have FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III stay on for two more years beyond his 10-year term.

What they all don’t agree on is whether it’s a good thing, with opinions ranging from good to bad to mixed. Most agents spoke to ticklethewire.com on the condition that they not be named.

“”It is wonderful,” said one agent. “It is great for our country.”

But some agents thought it was time for Mueller, 66, to go, and were critical of his focus on certain crimes and intelligence issues at the expense of others. They also have long advocated that a former agent — Mueller is a former federal prosecutor — would better understand their mindset and mission.

“I think it was time for a change,” said one agent, who was hoping the new director would be ex-FBI official Mike Mason, the choice of the FBI Agents Association.

Conversely, he said some of the names that had surfaced as potential replacements concerned him.

“It could have been worse,” he said of Mueller staying.

Another agent expressed mixed views as well.

“I think there are pluses and minuses,” said the agent. “I like Mueller. I don’t agree with everything he does. He’s got the toughest job around. And he’s done a good job.”

The agent said it’s good to have continuity at this time.

“”We just killed bin laden,” the agent said. “Threat levels are up. We’re in times we’ve never seen before. We’ve got wars on two fronts.”

The downside, he said, is that the legislation mandating term limits for the FBI director are “designed to bring in new blood. He also said the term limit was put in place to prevent politics from playing a role in the job, and to keep someone from creating a legacy like J. Edgar Hoover.

“The law was set for a reason. Are we defeating its purpose?” he asked.

Andrew G. Arena, special agent in charge of the Detroit FBI, said: “I think for the sake of the agency, it’s a good thing. It will provide continuity.  We’ll just carry on as we have been.”

With a new person, he noted:”You don’t know if someone is going to come in and change the direction” of the agency. “There was the fear of the unknown.”

Konrad Motyka, president of the FBI Agents Association, which had backed former FBI official Mike Mason as the next director, came out with a statement saying:

“I congratulate Director Robert Mueller on President Obama’s request to Congress to extend Director Mueller’s term for an additional two years.

“President Obama’s request to Congress reflects the critical role that the Director has played in transitioning the Bureau to a post-9/11 world that requires both investigative and intelligence gathering skills. We look forward to working with Director Mueller to continue to enhance the effectiveness of the FBI in the fight against terrorism and emerging threats without compromising the Bureau’s established expertise at both criminal and counterintelligence investigations.”

Mike Mason, who had worked under Mueller,  said Thursday: ” I couldn’t be happier.  I’m glad. He’s got the momentum going on a  lot of initiatives and this keeps the bureau marching in the right direction. ”

Mueller’s 10-year-term expires in September. Congress passed a law putting a 10-year term limit. Congress will now have to pass some type of legislation that would allow Mueller to remain for two more years.

Mueller has generally been warmly received on Capitol Hill, and is unlikely to find much opposition from Congress.

NY FBI JTTF Opts Out of NYPD Terror Case; Says Case was Problematic

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Friction is mounting between the FBI’s Joint Terrorism Task Force and New York police.

Radio station WNYC reports that the FBI’s JTTF chose not to get involved in a case involving two New York men allegedly involved in a plot to blow up a local synagogue because it was problematic, was being over-hyped and might not hold up in court. The station cited two unnamed federal sources.

But Deputy Police Commissioner Paul Browne told the station: “When somebody acquires weapons and plans to bomb the largest synagogue in Manhattan he can find, what do you call it, mischief?”

The FBI and New York Police, which has its own sophisticated counterterrorism unit, have beefed in the past.

Some FBI agents have privately questioned the tactics used by the NYPD unit and vice versa.

FBI Dir. Robert Mueller Among Thousands Who Attend Candlelight Vigil at National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial

FBI Dir. Robert Mueller and Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-Md) were among the thousands who attended Friday night's candlelight vigil in front of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington to honor those who gave their lives in the line of duty. The ceremony included a reading of the 316 names being added to the memorial this year. Below is a photo of the crowd/FBI photo

After Hoover, No FBI Director Has Served Longer than Robert S. Mueller III

Robert Mueller

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Next to the big guy, J. Edgar Hoover, Robert S. Mueller III is the longest serving FBI director.

And with Thursday’s announcement of a proposed two-year extension — which seems all but certain Congress will OK —  he’ll add to the record. His 10-year term is set to expire in September.

Next to Mueller, William Webster served the most years with  9 from Feb. 23, 1978 to May 25, 1987; Louis Freeh served nearly 8 years from Sept. 1, 1993 to June 25, 2001; William Sessions served nearly 6 years from Nov. 2, 1987 to July 19, 1993; and Clarence Kelley served nearly 5 from July 9, 1973 to Feb. 15, 1978.

William Webster/fbi photo

Hoover served nearly 37 years from July 1, 1935 to May 2, 1972.

There were also acting directors who served far shorter times.

After Hoover, Congress passed a law capping the FBI director’s term at 10-years. Congress will now have to change the overall legislation or pass some narrowly worded bill so Mueller can stay on for two more years. Mueller is generally well regarded on Capitol Hill, so it appears it won’t be a big problem passing some form of legislation.

That being said, some like Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Ia.) indicated Thursday that they will give the matter some examination.

“This is an unusual step by the President, and is somewhat of a risky precedent to set,” Grassley said in a statement.

“Thirty-five years ago Congress limited the FBI director’s term to one, 10-year appointment as an important safeguard against improper political influence and abuses of the past. There’s no question that Director Mueller has proven his ability to run the FBI. And, we live in extraordinary times.

“So, I’m open to the President’s idea, but I will need to know more about his plan to ensure that this is not a more permanent extension that would undermine the purposes of the term limit.”

Clarence Kelley

William Sessions/fbi photo

Louis Freeh

Agents’ Opinions Range from Good to Bad to Mixed on FBI Dir. Robert Mueller’s Proposed 2 Year Extension

Atty. Gen. Holder (left) and FBI Director Mueller /fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Nearly everyone in the FBI can agree they were caught off guard by President Obama’s announcement Thursday that he would seek to have FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III stay on for two more years beyond his 10-year term.

What they all don’t agree on is whether it’s a good thing, with opinions ranging from good to bad to mixed. Most agents spoke to ticklethewire.com on the condition that they not be named.

“”It is wonderful,” said one agent. “It is great for our country.”

But some agents thought it was time for Mueller, 66, to go, and were critical of his focus on certain crimes and intelligence issues at the expense of others. They also have long advocated that a former agent — Mueller is a former federal prosecutor — would better understand their mindset and mission.

“I think it was time for a change,” said one agent, who was hoping the new director would be ex-FBI official Mike Mason, the choice of the FBI Agents Association.

Conversely, he said some of the names that had surfaced as potential replacements concerned him.

Mike Mason/fbi photo

“It could have been worse,” he said of Mueller staying.

Another agent expressed mixed views as well.

“I think there are pluses and minuses,” said the agent. “I like Mueller. I don’t agree with everything he does. He’s got the toughest job around. And he’s done a good job.”

The agent said it’s good to have continuity at this time.

“”We just killed bin laden,” the agent said. “Threat levels are up. We’re in times we’ve never seen before. We’ve got wars on two fronts.”

The downside, he said, is that the legislation mandating term limits for the FBI director are “designed to bring in new blood. He also said the term limit was put in place to prevent politics from playing a role in the job, and to keep someone from creating a legacy like J. Edgar Hoover.

“The law was set for a reason. Are we defeating its purpose?” he asked.

Andrew G. Arena, special agent in charge of the Detroit FBI, said: “I think for the sake of the agency, it’s a good thing. It will provide continuity.  We’ll just carry on as we have been.”

With a new person, he noted:”You don’t know if someone is going to come in and change the direction” of the agency. “There was the fear of the unknown.”

Konrad Motyka, president of the FBI Agents Association, which had backed former FBI official Mike Mason as the next director, came out with a statement saying:

“I congratulate Director Robert Mueller on President Obama’s request to Congress to extend Director Mueller’s term for an additional two years.

“President Obama’s request to Congress reflects the critical role that the Director has played in transitioning the Bureau to a post-9/11 world that requires both investigative and intelligence gathering skills. We look forward to working with Director Mueller to continue to enhance the effectiveness of the FBI in the fight against terrorism and emerging threats without compromising the Bureau’s established expertise at both criminal and counterintelligence investigations.”

Mike Mason, who had worked under Mueller,  said Thursday: ” I couldn’t be happier.  I’m glad. He’s got the momentum going on a  lot of initiatives and this keeps the bureau marching in the right direction. ”

Mueller’s 10-year-term expires in September. Congress passed a law putting a 10-year term limit. Congress will now have to pass some type of legislation that would allow Mueller to remain for two more years.

Mueller has generally been warmly received on Capitol Hill, and is unlikely to find much opposition from Congress.

Surprise Surprise: White House Wants FBI Dir. Mueller to Stay on for 2 More Years

Robert Mueller III last year in Denver at IACP / file fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — In a surprise move, President Obama announced Thursday he is seeking a two-year extension for FBI director Robert S. Mueller.

The move took many by surprise considering a search was underway for a replacement for Mueller whose 10-year term was coming to an end in September.

“In his ten years at the FBI, Bob Mueller has set the gold standard for leading the Bureau,” President Obama said in a statement.

“Given the ongoing threats facing the United States, as well as the leadership transitions at other agencies like the Defense Department and Central Intelligence Agency, I believe continuity and stability at the FBI is critical at this time.”

“Bob transformed the FBI after September 11, 2001 into a pre-eminent counterterrorism agency, he has shown extraordinary leadership and effectiveness at protecting our country every day since. He has impeccable law enforcement and national security credentials, a relentless commitment to the rule of law, unquestionable integrity and independence, and a steady hand that has guided the Bureau as it confronts our most serious threats.”

Mueller sent an email to agency employees  notifying them of the White House’s intentions and saying that he would be honored to serve.

The move saves the White House any confirmation battles on Capitol Hill where Mueller seems to enjoy strong support.  However, that being said, there were a lot of pretty safe candidates being mentioned as possible replacements.

Still, the Congress will have to pass some form of legislation to deal with the the extension since the current law specifies that an FBI director can serve only 10 years. The Senate Judiciary committee said Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) is looking into what needs to be done legislatively to address the issue.

A Congressional aide said that Congress could pass a law changing the term limit for the FBI director or pass narrower legislation just to deal with Muller’s circumstances.

The reactions were mixed at the FBI. Some people were happy. Others had been looking forward to a change. And still others offered pros and cons to the move.

Pakistani Ambassador Compares Hunt for bin Laden to Search for Boston Mobster “Whitey” Bulger

He became a familar fixture on the list.

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The Boston Globe editorial page took a little exception to Pakistani Ambassador Husain Haqqani remark defending his nation by comparing the hunt for Osama bin Laden to the perennial search for the FBI Ten Most Wanted fugitive James “Whitey” Bulger — a mobster wanted for multiple murders and other charges,

“If Whitey Bulger can live undetected by American police for so long,’’ Haqqani asked The Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg, “why can’t Osama bin Laden live undetected by Pakistani authorities?’’ Haqqani was a Boston University professor from 2004 to 2008. Bulger has been on the lam since 1994 and authorities are offering a $2 million reward for information leading to his capture.

The Globe Editorial page weighed in on the ambassador’s remark, saying: “In fact, Bulger got away because a person in the FBI tipped him off, just as US officials feared Pakistani authorities would tip off bin Laden. And Bulger’s support network of family and trusted friends seems a bit like the one that appears to have sustained bin Laden in Pakistan, much to the outrage of some Americans.”

Boston Mobster Whitey Bulger

Then the Globe tossed in this zinger: “Meanwhile, the FBI might do well to check out any walled compounds on the South Shore, just to be sure.”