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FBI

FBI: Air Force Officer Accused of Breaking Lobbying Law with Lucrative Private Sector Job

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

As an Air Force captain, Adam J. Pudenz oversaw contracts to provide boots to Afghan soldiers.

Now Pudenz earns $40,000-a-month working for the company that was selling the boots, ABC News reports.

The FBI accuses Carroll,  an Iowa resident of violating a ban on representing companies that he oversees when he took a job with Kabul Milli Trading Company.

Pudenz, 33, was arrested last week and charged with violating the lobbying laws.

Pudenz oversaw nearly $1 billion worth of boots.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Outgoing FBI Director Mueller III Speaks About How Sept. 11 Changed the FBI

Robert Mueller

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Outgoing FBI Director Robert S Mueller III never imagined that his bureau would be consumed with the fight on terror.

After all, Mueller started his job as director a week before the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

“I love prosecuting cases, and I love doing investigations, particularly homicide investigations and the like, and that’s why I became a prosecutor,” Mueller said in a rare interview with reporters at FBI headquarters, the Washington Post reports.“I did not expect to be spending my time preventing terrorist attacks,”

Twelve years later, Mueller is exiting a bureau that has been transformed to handle the global war on terror. Since the attacks, the FBI has invested heavily in intelligence programs and information technology, while opening 18 overseas posts.

“You have one metric, and that is preventing all attacks. . . . If there’s one attack, you are unsuccessful,” he said.

Special Agent in Charge of Milwaukee FBI Assigned to Building Division in D.C.

Teresa Carlson/fbi photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Head of the FBI’s Milwaukee office, Teresa Carlson, is temporarily working at the Facilities and Logistics Services Division at headquarters in Washington D.C. while authorities investigate claims that she pressured a subordinate to commit perjury, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports.

Still, Carlson remains the special agent in charge of the Milwaukee office, according to FBI spokesman Leonard Peace.

Carlson is accused of pressuring a subordinate to “come down on the side of the government” in a trial by a former Army Ranger who said the FBI discriminated against him because he had lost one of his hands in a training mission.

The Office of Inspector General is investigating Carlson.

Congressman to FBI: ‘Why Won’t You Come in And Talk to Us’

Rep. Keating/gov photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

U.S. Rep. William Keating  touched on a new  FBI directive is urging the bureau to share information with local police about terrorist threats, the Boston Herald reports. He wants to talk to the FBI.

“That’s news to me,” Keating, a Homeland Security Committee member, said. “If there’s something through these directives and meetings whereby they’re helping communication, then they’re still not communicating that with Congress.”

Boston Police Commissioner Edward F. Davis testified in a congressional hearing, saying the FBI never shared information about the slain Boston Marathon bomber, Tamerlan Tsarnaev.

Keating added: “First and foremost, the first line of defense is local. This is something that was underscored time and time again. The one biggest question I have right now is, ‘Why won’t you come in and talk to us.”

Reporter in Washington D.C. Learns FBI Was Monitoring His Calls to Disgraced D.C. Councilman

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A tenacious reporter who covers urban affairs and the D.C. Council received a troubling email from the U.S. Attorney’s Office: His voice was picked up after agents tapped the cell phones of now-disgraced Councilman Michael Brown, WUSA9 reports.

“I’m not going to be surprised if I call someone at some point in the near future and they say ‘I can’t talk to you because the FBI might be listening,'” reporter Bruce Johnson told the news station, where he works. “Bottom line, of course it’s unsettling when you get a call saying the FBI has heard part of your conversation in the course of you doing your job.”

Here’s a statement from the US Attorney’s Office:

“As has been widely reported, during the investigation which led to former Council Member Michael A. Brown’s conviction on a bribery charge, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia authorized the interception of wire and electronic communications on two cell phones used by Mr. Brown during the relevant time period.

“Thus, some communications between Mr. Brown and individuals not otherwise connected to the government’s investigation were intercepted. Significantly, law enforcement utilized procedures to minimize and reduce to the smallest possible number the amount of innocent and non-pertinent communications that were intercepted between individuals and the target of its investigations.

“The government, as it does in all of its Title III investigations, recently provided notice to individuals who were named in the court orders authorizing interceptions or whose communications with Mr. Brown were intercepted during the course of its investigation. The contents of those intercepted communications will remain sealed, will not be used for any other purpose, and are not anticipated to result in any additional charges against Mr. Brown or anyone else.”

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Writer William Vollmann Says FBI Suspected Him of Being Unabomber, Terrorist

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Few authors write with as much insight into violence and war as William Vollmann.

The winner of a National Book Award, Vollmann revealed in a Harper’s essay, “Life as a Terrorist,” that he was suspected of being a terrorist and even the Unabomber because of the content of his fiction, the Washington Post writes.

In the September issue of Harper’s magazine, Vollmann reveals the outrageous contents of his 785-page secret government file – 300 pages of which were obtained by suing the FBI and CIA.

“I begin to see how government haters are made,” he writes.

Vollmann discovered that he was investigated for ties to terrorism and was even suspected of being the Unabomber.

“Once you’re a suspect and you’re in the system, that ain’t goin’ away.  … Anytime there’s a terrorist investigation, your name’s gonna come up,” Vollmann wrote.

FBI, NSA Monitored Emails, Texts in Salt Lake City Area During Winter Olympics in 2002

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The FBI and NSA monitored all emails and text messages in the Salt Lake City area in 2002 when the city was hosting the Winter Olympics, the Salt Lake Tribune reports.

Unnamed officials said the two agencies worked with Qwest Communications to intercept communications for nearly six months.

Former Sen. Bob Bennett, R-Utah, said he wasn’t aware of the surveillance but said it’s to be expected.

“If they were not intercepting text messages then they were not doing their jobs at the center of world attention,” Bennett said. “Sure they were. I just assumed that they were.”

The Olympics came just five months after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Parents Awarded $3M in Wrongful Death Suit in Son’s Death at Hands of DEA

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The parents of an 18-year-old honor student who was shot and killed by plainclothes DEA agents in a state of confusion in southern California were awarded $3 million in a wrongful death lawsuit, the Los Angeles Times reports.

U.S. District Judge Michael Fitzgerald ruled that the DEA agents were not negligent in their actions but should not have fired their weapons at Zachary Champommier’s car because it was unlikely to improve the situation.

Family members described Zachary as a harmless “band geek” who would never intentionally hurt law enforcement, the LA Times wrote.

The shooting occurred while Champommier arrived at the Studio City parking lot to meet a friend. When he saw the people detaining his friend, he hit a sheriff’s deputy with his car.

According to the suit, Champommier “had no way of knowing that these were law enforcement officers rather than criminal thugs,” and he drove his car to “escape the danger.”

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