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FBI

Georgia May Have Killed More than Troy Davis

Troy Davis

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

No one can defend a convicted cop killer. That’s easy to say.

But they can if there’s a question as to whether the person killed the cop, and if the state has decided to execute that person with so much evidence in doubt.

At 11:08 p.m. Wednesday night, the  state of Georgia executed Troy Davis, who was convicted in 1991 of killing Georgia cop Mark MacPhail, who was working as a security guard at the time of shooting. Several witnesses have recanted key testimony. The evidence is thin.

The Pope had weighed in on the matter. He had asked the state of Georgia to reconsider. So did folks like ex-FBI Director William Sessions, who had serious doubts about the case.

This isn’t a pro or anti-death penalty issue.  It’s not a conservative or liberal issue — at least not the way I see it.

It’s really an issue of whether our justice system has a conscience, whether it cares if it puts someone to death when so much evidence is in question.

The Supreme Court rejected a last minute bid to halt the execution. So did the Georgia pardons board.

Georgia may have just killed one guy, Troy Davis, who may or may not have killed the officer.

It also killed the faith some had in our system.

I’d love to hear your opinion. Send any comments to lengela@ticklethewire.com or feel free to post a comment below.

FBI Probing Arabic Writing on Dozens of Southwest Airline Planes

http://youtu.be/lhgYDt8RuCg

Computer Hackers Indicted in Calif., Ariz. and Ohio

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Some have been called criminals and troublemakers, some freedom fighters and political activists. Now, three can assuredly be called indicted.

Two computer hackers affiliated with the hacking collectives LulzSec and Anonymous have been arrested by the FBI, reports Fox News.

Cody Kretsinger, 23, was charged in Phoenix with conspiracy and the unauthorized impairment of a protected computer. Christopher Doyon, 47, was charged in Mountain View, Calif. with conspiracy to cause intentional damage to a protected computer, causing intentional damage to a protected computer and aiding and abetting. Joshua Covelli, a 26-year-old in Fairborn, Ohio, was charged with the same.

According to Fox, the indictments allege that Doyon and Covelli participated in a “distributed denial of service” attack on the computer servers of Santa Cruz County, Calif. in 2010 as part of the People’s Liberation Front, a hacking group associated with Anonymous. The attack took the county computers offline.

Kretsinger is believed to have taken part in the hacking of Sony Pictures Entertainment using a hacking technique called SQL injection to obtain confidential information from Sony, according to Fox. He is then alleged to have distributed the stolen information on the LulzSec site and on Twitter.

To read more click here.

FBI-LAPD Homicide Operation Chalking Up Dozens of Arrests

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A joint FBI-Los Angles Police operation aimed a cutting a backlog of gang-related killings is showing some results, the Los Angeles Times reports.

The paper reports that the joint operation, which began in July 1 and ends Sept. 30, has resulted in 43 homicide arrests.

And the paper reported that the effort has just resulted in 11 new murder charges being filed.

Veteran LAPD Det. Sal LaBarbera said he expects the operation to clear more cases in the next 10 days before the Sept. 30 deadline.

 

Column: Georgia May Have Killed More than Troy Davis


Allan Lengel

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

No one can defend a convicted cop killer. That’s easy to say.

But they can if there’s a question as to whether the person killed the cop, and if the state has decided to execute that person with so much evidence in doubt.

At 11:08 p.m. Wednesday night, the  state of Georgia executed Troy Davis, who was convicted in 1991 of killing Georgia cop Mark MacPhail, who was working as a security guard at the time of shooting. Several witnesses have recanted key testimony. The evidence is thin.

The Pope had weighed in on the matter. He had asked the state of Georgia to reconsider. So did folks like ex-FBI Director William Sessions, who had serious doubts about the case.

This isn’t a pro or anti-death penalty issue.  It’s not a conservative or liberal issue — at least not the way I see it.

It’s really an issue of whether our justice system has a conscience, whether it cares if it puts someone to death when so much evidence is in question.

The Supreme Court rejected a last minute bid to halt the execution. So did the Georgia pardons board.

Georgia may have just killed one guy, Troy Davis, who may or may not have killed the officer.

It also killed the faith some had in our system.

I’d love to hear your opinion. Send any comments to lengela@ticklethewire.com or feel free to post a comment below in the comment section.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

 
 

An FBI Raid, a Suicide Kit and Egg on the Face of an Oregon Police Department

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Ooops.

The oops began when the FBI in San Diego notified the Springfield, Or. cops that a man in that community had purchased a suicide kit from a 91-year-old retired science teacher in California.

The FBI had raided the California woman’s home four months ago and then started — although belatedly — notifying police departments around the country about customers who had purchased the kit, Reuters news service reported.

On Tuesday, the Oregon police department stormed the home of a customer, and busted down the door in an attempt to save the person’s life.

Well, turns out that the home belonged to a copy editor at the Register-Guard newspaper who had purchased the homemade kit for a reporter working on a story about the issue.

Reuters reported that the copy editor wasn’t home at the time and the do-it-yourself asphyxiation package purchased seven months ago was in the reporter’s desk drawer.

Reuters reported that police apologized for the intrusion. Police explained that they had knocked the down the door thinking the man might be in danger of killing himself.

“We’re going to fix the door,” Springfield police sergeant John Umenhofer said, according to Reuters. “But we always err of the side of going in, if there is a question of safety.”

Reuters reports that San Diego FBI spokesman in San Diego Darrell Foxworth conceded that there was a four month lapse between the time the FBI raided the California woman’s home and notified the Springfield, Or., department. He said it took time to review the California woman’s records and get the word to local authorities.

 

FBI Dir. Robert Mueller Meets in Pakistan With Interior Minister

Robert Mueller III/fbi file photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III visited Pakistan Wednesday, the country where Osama bin Laden took refuge and was killed by the American military in May, the Associated Press reported.

The visit comes as tension mounts over the U.S. demands that Pakistan crack down on Afghan militants hiding out in Pakistan, AP reported.

AP reported that the Pakistani government confirmed that Mueller met with Pakistani Interior Minister Rehman Malik for talks Wednesday in the capital.

AP reported that U.S. officials declined to discuss the visit.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

 

 

Ten Year Anniversary of Anthrax Attacks; Congressman Holt Still Not Satisfied With FBI Probe

Rep. Rush Holt

By Rep. Rush Holt (D-N.J.)
Ashbury Park Press

Ten years ago, America was a nation shaken by grief and terror. Nearly 3,000 people had perished in the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon and in the thwarted attack on the Capitol. Federal authorities were warning the public that additional al-Qaida “sleeper cells” still might be at large in the United States. We were living through a national nightmare.

Less than a week later, the nightmare deepened.

Sometime on Sept. 17 or Sept. 18, someone deposited five envelopes — four addressed to media outlets in New York, and one addressed to the National Enquirer in Florida — in a central New Jersey mailbox. Later, two more letters would be mailed to members of the U.S. Senate. Each contained a highly refined dry powder containing spores of Bacillus anthracis, which can cause deadly anthrax infection in humans.

Unlike the attacks of Sept. 11, which erupted over a few terrible hours, the anthrax attacks unfolded in slow motion over several weeks. First, news reports surfaced that a Florida man had died after entering the hospital with an unknown respiratory illness. Then, the public learned he had contracted anthrax, an infection that occurs naturally but has long been explored as a biological weapon.

It was possible, at first, to believe that the Florida infection was just a freak accident, much as it was possible early on Sept. 11 to believe that the first plane crash in New York was simply a catastrophic mistake.

To read the full column click here.