Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

June 2021
S M T W T F S
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
27282930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



FBI

Communication Companies Less Compliant to FBI Requests

Devices from Minnesota Found in Iraq IEDs, Five Charged

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Radio frequency modules from a Minnesota manufacturer, after being smuggled into Iran, ended up in improvised explosive devices used against U.S. soldiers on the battlefields of Iraq, federal authorities alleged this week.

Authorities in Singapore arrested Wong Yuh Lan (Wong), Lim Yong Nam (Nam), Lim Kow Seng (Seng), and Hia Soo Gan Benson (Hia) on Monday after a U.S. request for extradition to stand trial in DC . Hossein Larijani, a citizen of Iran, is also charged in the scheme, though he is still at large. Four companies were also indicted in the matter.

The group is accused of smuggling 6,000 radio communication devices into Iran in violation of trade laws; 16 of the devices were later found in bombs in Iraq. According to the FBI, the Singapore citizens bought the devices with a stated shipment location in Singapore, then knowingly had them illegally routed to purchasers in Iran, making tens of thousands of dollars.

“This case underscores the continuing threat posed by Iranian procurement networks seeking to obtain U.S. technology through fraud and the importance of safeguarding that technology,” Lisa Monaco, assistant attorney general for national security, said in the statement.

The 12-count indictment includes charges of conspiracy to defraud the US, smuggling, the illegal export of goods from the US to Iran, false statements and obstruction of justice, among other charges.

To read more click here.

Column: How the Patriot Act Stripped Me of My Free-Speech Rights

By Nicholas Merrill
Washington Post

Sometime in 2012, I will begin the ninth year of my life under an FBI gag order, which began when I received what is known as a national security letter at the small Internet service provider I owned. On that day in 2004 (the exact date is redacted from court papers, so I can’t reveal it), an FBI agent came to my office and handed me a letter. It demanded that I turn over information about one of my clients and forbade me from telling “any person” that the government had approached me.

National security letters are issued by the FBI, not a judge, to obtain phone, computer, and banking information. Instead of complying, I spoke with a lawyer at the American Civil Liberties Union and filed a constitutional challenge against the NSL provision of the Patriot Act, which was signed into law 10 years ago Wednesday.

A decade later, much of the government’s surveillance policy remains shrouded in secrecy, making it impossible for the American public to engage in a meaningful debate on the effectiveness or wisdom of various practices.

To read full column click here.

The Ok Bombing it Ain’t; Ex-FBI Director Asked to Investigate SAT Test Security

Louis J. Freeh/adl photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

As FBI Director Louie Freeh oversaw some of the biggest investigations in the nation including the Oklahoma bombing and the 1998 bombings of American embassies in Africa.

Now as a private lawyer and consultant, he’s being asked to tackle a task with a little less world import.

The New York Times reported that the College Board is hiring Freeh to review its security involving SAT tests.

The move comes in wake of a scandal involving seven Long Island teenagers who were arrested for cheating.

The Times reported that Nassau County prosecutors filed criminal charges on Sept. 27 against Samuel Eshaghoff, 19, who is accused of taking payments to take the SAT tests for six former and current students at Great Neck North High School.

The Times reported that scandal still has potential to get bigger and involve more students.

Fed Law Enforcement Infiltrating Cartels in Mexico

By GINGER THOMPSON
New York Times

WASHINGTON — American law enforcement agencies have significantly built up networks of Mexican informants that have allowed them to secretly infiltrate some of that country’s most powerful and dangerous criminal organizations, according to security officials on both sides of the border.

As the United States has opened new law enforcement and intelligence outposts across Mexico in recent years, Washington’s networks of informants have grown there as well, current and former officials said. They have helped Mexican authorities capture or kill about two dozen high-ranking and midlevel drug traffickers, and sometimes have given American counternarcotics agents access to the top leaders of the cartels they are trying to dismantle.

Typically, the officials said, Mexico is kept in the dark about the United States’ contacts with its most secret informants — including Mexican law enforcement officers, elected officials and cartel operatives — partly because of concerns about corruption among the Mexican police, and partly because of laws prohibiting American security forces from operating on Mexican soil.

“The Mexicans sort of roll their eyes and say we know it’s happening, even though it’s not supposed to be happening,” said Eric L. Olson, an expert on Mexican security matters at the Woodrow Wilson Center.

To read the full story click here.

 

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST 

 

 

 

Andrew Weissmann Named FBI’s General Counsel

Andrew Weissmann/photo columbia law

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Andrew Weissmann, a private lawyer who once served as the former director of the federal government’s Enron task force, and who also previously served as FBI Director Robert S. Mueller’s special counsel, will become the FBI’s new general counsel, according to the Am Law Daily reported.

The publication reports that Weissman has left his post as cochair of Jenner & Block’s white-collar defense and investigations practice, a New York-based firm he joined in 2006.

Weissmann replaces Valerie Caproni, who became the general counsel at Northrop Grumman Corporation earlier this month, Am Law Daily reported.

The publication reported that he will oversee a 300-lawyer law department.

 

 

Affleck and Matt Damon to Make Movie About Mobster “Whitey” Bulger

Ben Affleck/facebook photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

It was just a matter of time.

Four months after the FBI captured Boston mobster James “Whitey” Bulger  in California, word has surfaced that a movie will be made based on his life.

The website Deadline New York reports that actors Ben Affleck and Matt Damon “are reuniting in their first real picture partnership since Good Will Hunting” to make the movie about Bulger.

Deadline New York reports that Warner Bros will make the film and Affleck will direct, co-star. Damon will play Bulger.

“Matt and I have been looking for something to do together for some time,” Affleck said, according to the website. “We’ve heard about Whitey Bulger since we were kids, and we are excited by the prospect of putting it on screen.”

The movie The Departed, directed by Martin Scorsese, was supposedly inspired by the Bulger story.

Bulger was a fugitive for 16 years.

The website said the new movie will be based on Bulger’s life including his time as an FBI informant, which has long been a sensitive issue within the FBI.

 

Arson Suspect Pleads to Threatening to Kill ATF Task Force Member

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Some thoughts are better kept to yourself.

That’s what Craig Allen Shepperd, 37, of Whitehall, Md., hopefully learned.

Shepperd pleaded guilty to threatening to murder an ATF task force member pleaded guilty last Friday in Baltimore federal court.

“ATF agents, along other federal, state, and local law enforcement officers put their lives on the line everyday to reduce violent crime, and keep peace in our communities,” Mark Chait, ATF special agent in charge of the Baltimore office, said in a statement. “ATF will not tolerate anyone who threatens the peace of our citizens, or those who have sworn to protect them.”

The incident happened when the task force member visited Sheppard in the Baltimore County Jail. Shepperd was a suspect in the arson of a horse barn that burned down in Monkton, Md. on Aug. 26, 2010, authorities said. He was in the jail on a state indictment for arson.

Authorities say Shepperd became very agitated and told the ATF task force member that he was a marksman and a very good hunter and he would shoot the task force member in the head.

Shepperd stated that when he got out of jail he would would meet the ATF task force officer at at a restaurant and neither of them would come out alive.

Authorities said they also had recordings of conversations in which Shepperd made statements to an individual and his father repeating those threats to murder the ATF officer.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST