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FBI Trained Alaskan Residents to Become Informants to FBI in Event of Invasion

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Fearing the Soviet Union was planning to attack Alaska in the 1950s, the FBI trained Alaskan residents so become informant behind enemy lines, according to declassified documents, reports RT.com.

The initiative did not include women or native people, like the Native Americans.

At the time, the FBI feared that the Soviet would invade by plane and or drop paratroopers on more populated areas in Alaska.

The initiative to train citizens to provide intelligence was a highly classified project, code-named “Washtub.”

The FBI didn’t trust the native population .

“Eskimo, Indian and Aleut groups in the Territory should be avoided in view of their propensities to drink to excess and their fundamental indifference to constituted governments and political philosophies. It is pointed out that their prime concern is with survival and their allegiance would easily shift to any power in control,” insisted the founders of the program.

 

FBI Investigates Hacking, Leaking of More Than 100 Nude Photos of Celebrities

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is investigating who hacked and leaked nude photos of more than 100 well-known celebrities over the weekend, the Business Insider reports.

The hacker exposed the nude photos and videos using the internet forum 4chan. Some of the victims, including Academy Award winner Jennifer Lawrence, sparked the FBI investigation by calling law enforcement. Some of the photos may be fake, according to Business Insider.

“The FBI is aware of the allegations concerning computer intrusions and the unlawful release of material involving high profile individuals and is addressing the matter,” said a statement from the Los Angeles FBI. “Any further comment would be inappropriate at this time.”

Lawrence’s publicist lashed out at the invasion of privacy.

“This is a flagrant violation of privacy. The authorities have been contacted and will prosecute anyone who posts the stolen photos of Jennifer Lawrence,” said Liz Mahoney, publicist for Lawrence, in a statement.

Opinion: Homeland Security Doesn’t Need to Arm Cops to Fight Average Americans

Trevor Timm
The Guardian

For three weeks and counting, America has raged against the appalling behavior of the local police in Ferguson, Missouri, and for good reason: automatic rifles pointed at protesters, tank-like armored trucks blocking marches, the teargassing and arresting of reporters, tactics unfit even for war zones – it was all enough to make you wonder whether this was America at all. But as Congress returns to Washington this week, the ire of a nation should also be focused on the federal government agency that has enabled so much of the rise of military police, and so much more: the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).

The 240,000-employee, Bush-invented bureaucratic behemoth that didn’t even exist 15 years ago has been the primary arms dealer for out-of-control local cops in Ferguson and beyond, handing out tens of billions of dollars in grants for military equipment in the last decade with little to no oversight and even less training on how use it. “From an oversight perspective, DHS grant programs are pretty much a mess,” a congressional aide told the Guardian’s Spencer Ackerman the other day:

They don’t know what’s been bought with the money, how that equipment has been used, or whether it’s made anyone measurably any safer.
Buttressed by government policies that make it sometimes impossible for citizens to hold police accountable for civil rights violations, police can act like paramilitary forces to combat the most mundane crimes without much worry of the consequences. As Matt Apuzzo of the New York Timesreported in June:

Police SWAT teams are now deployed tens of thousands of times each year, increasingly for routine jobs. Masked, heavily armed police officers in Louisiana raided a nightclubin 2006 as part of a liquor inspection. In Florida in 2010, officers in SWAT gear and with guns drawn carried out raids on barbershops that mostly led only to charges of ‘barbering without a license.’

There is now so much attention on the paramilitary pipeline that the White House has reportedly ordered a comprehensive review of the sprawling grant programs. But the problem with DHS is much larger than just combat gear: Homeland Security is also transferring tens or hundreds of millions of dollars in high-tech spying technology to local police through a sprawling backroom operation surveilling your neighborhood, much of which may be unconstitutional.

To read more click here.

Other Stories of Interest

 

Weekend Series on Law Enforcement: A Documentary on the U.S. Secret Service

httpv://youtu.be/-F84iywFfvc

Mexican National Accused of Fatally Shooting Off-Duty Border Patrol Agent Faces More Charges

Gustavo Tijerina

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Mexican national accused of shooting an off-duty Border Patrol agent during a robbery in Texas was charged with additional crimes related to more robberies Thursday, the Monitor reports.

Gustavo Tijerina, 30, was charged with seven counts of aggravated armed robbery and three counts of engaging in organized criminal activity in connection with four armed robberies in Cameron County. Cars were stolen in those cases.

Tijerina already has been charged with capital murder in the shooting death of Border Patrol Agent Javier Vega Jr., 36, of Kingsville.

Tijerina likely won’t be going anywhere after his bail was set at $2 million.

Other Stories of Interest


Ex-Special Agent in Charge of Milwaukee’s FBI Office Accused of Pressuring subordinate to lie under oath

Teresa Carlson/fbi photo

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The former head of the Milwaukee FBI office is accused of urging an agent to commit perjury and grilling subordinates for talking with investigators, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports.

The Office of the Inspector General believes Teresa Carlson likely lied when she was questioned and may have violated federal law by telling an agent to lie under oath.

Despite the findings, the FBI declines to discuss whether she was disciplined, and the Justice Department opted not to prosecute.

Carlson is the acting deputy assistant director of Facilities and Logistics Services Division.

According to Inspector General Michael Horowitz, Carlson “conducted herself unprofessionally and exhibited extremely poor judgment” when she allegedly told Special Agent Mark Crider to lie under oath.

 

Wisconsin’s DOJ Delayed Child Pornography Investigations for Months, Records Show

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Wisconsin Department of Justice delayed investigations of child pornography tips for months, the Post Crescent reports.

Criticism of the DOJ’s Internet child pornography unit mounted in March, when Milwaukee Special Agent-in-Charge Willie Brantley was fired and Special Agent Anna King resigned. It was discovered that nearly four dozen cases languished for months.

DOJ officials said they are overwhelmed and were forced to prioritize cases.

“A deep dive on any of these cases will reflect that they … were handled appropriately or resulted in discipline,” said DOJ Division of Criminal Investigation Administrator Dave Matthews.

Officials at the office denied any systemic problems existed.

Sen. Grassley Demands Answers from DEA about ‘Brutal Captivity’ of College Student

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Sen. Chuck Grassley wants answers.

The Republican from Iowa is demanding details of the treatment of Daniel Chong, who was detained and deprived of water and food for five days, the Hill reports.

“The American people still do not know the full details about Mr. Chong’s mistreatment and abuse,” Grassley wrote. “And despite this inexcusable behavior and long-overdue findings, the American people still have no idea whether these agents and administrators are still working for the DEA.”

The letter to DEA Administrator Michele Leonhart comes after an Inspector General report that “raises even more questions.”

“Not only were there specific failures by specific agents and employees that led to Mr. Chong’s brutal captivity, as well as a possible attempted cover up by senior DEA officials, but the entire system itself was set up to fail and forestall any future review,” Grassley wrote. “This is wholly unacceptable.”

Chong, a college student, reached a $4.1 million settlement with the DEA.