Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

May 2021
S M T W T F S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



FBI’s Washington Field Office Focuses on Returning U.S. Hostages Held by Terrorists

Andrew McCabe/fbi photo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

American journalist Theo Curtis said he might not be alive if not for the FBI.

FBI agents in the Washington D.C. field office had been working on getting Curtis released from Syria, where he had been held by an Islamist group, the Washington Post reports.

The FBI “deserves some credit for what it did for me,” Curtis said in an interview.

The field office is handling the investigation into the kidnapping and killing of Americans by the Islamic State.

Leading the office is Andrew G. McGabe, who the Washington Post described as a “rising star” who could be the next deputy director after the retirement of Mark F. Giuliano.

“It’s been an intense couple of years,” McCabe says.

Judge: Jill Kelly May Press Forward with Lawsuit Against FBI Over Invasion of Privacy

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Jill Kelley may continue pursuing her lawsuit against the FBI over the scandal involving former CIA Director David Patraeus, a judge ruled Monday.

The New York Daily News reports that U.S. District Judge Amy Berman declined to dismiss a case by Kelly, who claims the FBI and Justice Department violated her privacy by leaking personal information about her to the media.

The case came to light when Kelly told the FBI in 2012 that she had been receiving harassing emails, which turned out to be from Paula Broadwell, who was having an affair with Patraeus.

Soon after, the news media obtained personal information about Kelley.

The judge’s decision, however, does not touch the merits of the case.

 

FBI Investigates Missouri Officer’s Use of Stun Gun After Teen Hospitalized in Critical Condition

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is investigating a Missouri police officer’s use of a stun gun to subdue a 17-year-old during a traffic stop.

The Associated Press reports that the stun gun left Bryce Masters in critical condition.

The incident happened in the suburban Kansas City community of Independence.

Police said the officer resorted to using stun gun because the teen was physically resisting.

The officer is on administrative leave pending an investigation.

Maters’ family was seeking a federal probe.

The FBI’s Kansas City field office is handling.

Justice Department Launches Plan to Identify Radicals with U.S. Passports As ISIS Threat Grows

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Justice Department opened a new front on the war against radicals.

The Los Angeles Times reports that Attorney General Eric Holder Jr. announced plans to identify radicals with U.S. passports.

The idea is to identify Americans before they travel abroad.

“We have established processes for detecting American extremists who attempt to join terror groups abroad,” Holder said.

Holder has said that dozens of Americans are joining terrorists in Syria.

“In the face of a threat so grave, we cannot afford to be passive,” he said in Oslo two months ago.

Attorneys for Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect Tsarnaev Deny Impersonating FBI Employees

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Prosecutors are accusing the defense lawyers for Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev of posing as FBI employees to investigate their client’s background in Russia, the Boston Globe reports.

“Let us be clear: At no time have members of the defense team misrepresented themselves or lied about their work,” Tsarnaev’s lawyers wrote in papers filed Monday in US District Court.

Calling the allegations “false and facially preposterous, ” the lawyers charged that prosecutors had made an “absurd charge.”

Russian authorities recently told the U.S. government that Tsarnaev’s defense team traveled to Russia to investigate the case and falsely claimed they were FBI employees.

“While conducting interviews in Russia, the members of the defense team reportedly refused to produce documents confirming their legal status and identified themselves as employees of the FBI,” prosecutors wrote. “As a result, the Russian government . . . expelled them.”

A New FBI Show Is Coming to Prime-Time TV This Season on CBS

By Alan Stamm
ticklethewire.com

Josh Dunhamel is no Efrem Zimbalist Jr., and his new TV show is unlike “The F.B.I.”

The 2014 version is “Battle Creek,” a drama-comedy set in that Michigan city and picked up by CBS for at least 13 episodes. No date is announced for its “coming soon” mid-season debut.

Dunhamel plays Special Agent Milt Chamberlain, sent to open a field office in the economically depressed Midwestern city of 52,000.

“It’s a throwback old-school cop show,” Dunhamel tells Lauren Moraski of CBS News. “I play an FBI agent who’s setting up a satellite office in Battle Creek.

“We work together with some of the local detectives in this underfunded run-down department. So my character has all the resources in the world and this poor police department has almost nothing. So it’s a contrast between local law enforcement and the FBI. It’s funny, but it’s also a serious procedural at the same time.”

His main co-star is Dean Winters as local Det. Russ Agnew. They spar as a mismatched pair, much as Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy do in “The Heat,” a 2013 comedy film. And as Nick Nolte and Eddie Murphy do in “48Hrs.” (1982) and its 1990 sequel. Similarly, Sylvester Stallone and Kurt Russell played “Tango & Cash” on the big screen in 1969. Hey, no one pitches this as a breakthrough concept.

Here’s how CBS promotes the new series, shot in Los Angeles:

“As Russ and Milt work long hours together, the question is: Will it be Milt’s charm and endless supply of high-end resources or Russ’ old-fashioned cynicism, guilt and deception that prove to be the keys to catching the bad guys in his beloved hometown?

The executive producer is Vince Gilligan, who produced “Breaking Bad,” which goes a long way toward explaining why USAToday this summer called it “one of next season’s most-anticipated new series.”

Gilligan says he’s “never actually been to Battle Creek,” but likes the name and will portray it as “a city of underdogs.”

 

Here’s a partial list of some of other FBI shows

  • “The F.B.I.,” 1965-74:  Insp. Lewis Erskine (Zimbalist) and several agents handled cases based on real FBI files. Erskine reported to Arthur Ward (Phillip Abbott), assistant to the director. The technical adviser was W. Mark Felt, an associate director of the bureau later unmasked as Watergate informant “Deep Throat.” It ran for 241 episodes.
  • “Mancuso, F.B.I.” 1989-90:  Robert Loggia starred on NBC as Nick Mancuso, a bureau veteran assigned to headquarters, where superiors saw him as a maverick with little regard for agency rules and procedures. Low ratings limited it to one season and prime-time summer reruns in 1993.
  • “The FBI Files,” 1998-2006: This 120-episode documentary series ran on the Discovery Channel cable network, using reenactments and interviews with agents and forensic scientists to dramatize real cases.

A New FBI Show Is Coming to Prime-Time TV This Season on CBS

By Alan Stamm
ticklethewire.com

Josh Dunhamel is no Efrem Zimbalist Jr., and his new TV show is unlike “The F.B.I.” But another show starring an FBI agent is coming to TV.  

The 2014 version is “Battle Creek,” a drama-comedy set in that Michigan city and picked up by CBS for at least 13 episodes. No date is announced for its “coming soon” mid-season debut.

Dunhamel plays Special Agent Milt Chamberlain, sent to open a field office in the economically depressed Midwestern city of 52,000.

“It’s a throwback old-school cop show,” Dunhamel tells Lauren Moraski of CBS News. “I play an FBI agent who’s setting up a satellite office in Battle Creek.

“We work together with some of the local detectives in this underfunded run-down department. So my character has all the resources in the world and this poor police department has almost nothing. So it’s a contrast between local law enforcement and the FBI. It’s funny, but it’s also a serious procedural at the same time.”

His main co-star is Dean Winters as local Det. Russ Agnew. They spar as a mismatched pair, much as Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy do in “The Heat,” a 2013 comedy film. And as Nick Nolte and Eddie Murphy do in “48Hrs.” (1982) and its 1990 sequel. Similarly, Sylvester Stallone and Kurt Russell played “Tango & Cash” on the big screen in 1969. Hey, no one pitches this as a breakthrough concept.

Here’s how CBS promotes the new series, shot in Los Angeles:

“As Russ and Milt work long hours together, the question is: Will it be Milt’s charm and endless supply of high-end resources or Russ’ old-fashioned cynicism, guilt and deception that prove to be the keys to catching the bad guys in his beloved hometown?

The executive producer is Vince Gilligan, who produced “Breaking Bad,” which goes a long way toward explaining why USAToday this summer called it “one of next season’s most-anticipated new series.”

Gilligan says he’s “never actually been to Battle Creek,” but likes the name and will portray it as “a city of underdogs.”

 

Here’s a partial list of earlier FBI shows:

  • “The F.B.I.,” 1965-74:  Insp. Lewis Erskine (Zimbalist) and several agents handled cases based on real FBI files. Erskine reported to Arthur Ward (Phillip Abbott), assistant to the director. The technical adviser was W. Mark Felt, an associate director of the bureau later unmasked as Watergate informant “Deep Throat.” It ran for 241 episodes.
  • “Mancuso, F.B.I.” 1989-90:  Robert Loggia starred on NBC as Nick Mancuso, a bureau veteran assigned to headquarters, where superiors saw him as a maverick with little regard for agency rules and procedures. Low ratings limited it to one season and prime-time summer reruns in 1993.
  • “The FBI Files,” 1998-2006: This 120-episode documentary series ran on the Discovery Channel cable network, using reenactments and interviews with agents and forensic scientists to dramatize real cases.

Police Search for Men Who Posed As FBI Agents, Pistol-Whipped Man During Fake Raid

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Police are looking for two armed men who posed as FBI agents while knocking on a suburban Boston apartment Saturday night.

The Boston Globe reports that assailants said they had a search warrant and pistol-whipped an occupant who opened the door in Waltham, Mass.

The assailants fled the apartment after striking the occupant several times over the head.

The occupant, who was taken to the hospital for head injuries, had told the assailants that he had called 911.