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ISIS Sympathizer Who Attacked FBI Agent with Knife Gets 17 Years in Prison

Fareed Mumuni

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

An ISIS sympathizer who attacked an FBI agent with a knife and was plotting a pressure-cooker bomb attack in the New York area was sentenced to 17 years in prison.

Fareed Mumuni, 23, who also was accused of trying to help ISIS sympathizers get to Syria, lunged at an unsuspecting FBI agent with a knife after feds arrived at his Staten Island home in June 2015.

The agent, Kevin Coughlin, decided at the last minute to wear body armor, which prevented the blade from puncturing him.

“I never met you. I never wronged you,”Coughlin told Mumumi at Thursday’s sentencing, according to the New York Daily News. “I never did anything to you, yet you tried to kill me.” 

Brooklyn Federal Judge Margo Brodie rejected the prosecutors’ recommendation that Mumuni be sentenced to 80 years, saying he wasn’t a ringleader and didn’t recruit others to ISIS.

Other Stories of Interest

Senate Committee Approves Bill to Protect Mueller’s Firing

U.S. Capitol

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

The Senate Judiciary Committee approved a bill Thursday to protect special counsel Robert Mueller from being fire by President Trump.

The committee advanced the measure with a 14-7 vote, putting pressure on Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to allow the full Senate to vote.

Four Republicans joined Democrats to pass the legislation: Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa, Jeff Flake of Arizona, Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, and Thom Tillis of North Carolina.

McConnell pledged last week to prevent the bill from reaching the Senate floor for a vote, saying there was “no indication” that Trump would fire Mueller and it was unlikely he would approve the measure.    

Grassley said Thursday “this bill should be considered by the full Senate,” despite the objections of McConnell, The USA Today reports.

“Because special counsel investigations only occur where there is a conflict of interest within the executive branch, special counsel investigations are usually matters of great national concern,” Grassley said. “And Congress, by exercising its oversight powers, can help the American people to have confidence that these investigations are conducted efficiently and independently.”

FBI Report Contradicts White House Timeline on Rob Porter Abuse

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

The FBI revealed that the White House was notified twice about accusations of violent abuse against then-staff secretary Rob Porter, casting serious doubt on the Trump administration’s insistence that it didn’t know about the allegations until much later.

The New York Times reports that FBI sent a detailed timeline to Congress that indicates the White House was twice told of “derogatory information” about Porter.

The FBI provided the timeline to the House Oversight Committee, saying the bureau first sent information on serious allegations of violent abuse to White House Counsel Don McGahn in March 2017.

In August 2017, the White House Personnel Security Office asked for Porter, his ex-wives and girlfriends to be re-interviewed.

Then in November 2017, the FBI said it sent a second, more detailed report to the White House Personnel Security.

The FBI report contradicts White House claims that it was never fully made aware of the allegations.

Trump Lashes Out at FBI and Justice Department on Fox & Friends

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

President Trump lashed out at the FBI and Justice Department and even threatened to intervene in the Russia investigation in a rambling, half-hour interview on “Fox & Friends.”

Trump angrily castigated the Justice Department, saying it should be investigating his enemies, not him.

“I am very disappointed in my Justice Department,” Trump said, adding that it’s an “absolute disgrace” that the FBI is investigating his former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, and his longtime personal attorney, Michael Cohen.

Trump cited the FBI searches as proof that he is being set.

“That’s not the FBI; that’s a fix,” Trump said.

Trump also said he may back out of his pledge to stay out of the Justice Department investigation.

“I have decided that I won’t be involved. I may change my mind at some point, because what’s going on is a disgrace,” he said.

Raising concerns that he may fire special counsel Robert Mueller and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, Trump called the Russia investigation a “witch hunt with people in the Justice Department who shouldn’t be there.”

Trump once again congratulated himself on firing then-FBI Director James Comey.

“I did a great thing for the American people by firing him,” Trump said. “Look, Comey is a leaker and he’s a liar and not only on this stuff — he’s been leaking for years.”

Border Patrol Agent Sentenced to 70 Months in Prison for Helping Smuggle Drugs

Border marker, via Border Patrol.

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

A Border Patrol agent who helped smuggle what he thought were drugs along the U.S.-Mexican border, was sentenced to 70 months in prison Wednesday.

Noe Lopez, 38, believed he was helping deliver meth and cocaine that was dropped off at the border, but he actually was talking to a confidential informant.

“You held a position of trust,” U.S. District Judge Dana Sabraw scolded Lopez. “This was the ultimate betrayal and breach of that trust.”

Lopez apologized for his actions.

“It’s something I regret — I’m going to regret — the rest of my life,” said Lopez, who worked out of the Imperial Beach station.

Former Watergate Attorney: Trump Invoking Fifth Amendment Would Be ‘Political Suicide’

Former Watergate prosecutor Jill Wine-Banks.

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

A former Watergate prosecutor warned that President Trump would commit “political suicide” if he invokes his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination in the lawsuit filed by pornographic film star Stormy Daniels.

“He cannot take the Fifth Amendment,” Jill Wine-Banks said on MSNBC. “That would be political suicide.”

Her comments follow news that longtime Trump attorney Michael Cohen plans to invoke the Fifth Amendment to avoid depositions and disclosing sensitive information that could be used against him in the criminal investigation.

“Michael Cohen can take the Fifth Amendment,” Wine-Banks said. “But the president of the United States cannot say, ‘I can’t answer questions because they might incriminate me in another matter.’ That just is not politically acceptable.”

Daniels filed a lawsuit against Cohen to get out of a nondisclosure agreement i which Cohen said he paid her $130,000 to stay quiet about an affair she said she had with Trump.

Michael Cohen, the longtime personal attorney of President Trump, plans to invoke his Fifth Amendment right to avoid testifying in a lawsuit filed against the president by pornographic film star known as Stormy Daniels.

Cohen, whose office, hotel room and home were raided by the FBI earlier this month as part of a criminal investigation by prosecutors in New York City, cited the probe in a court filing in California, where the lawsuit was filed, the New York Times reports. 

According to the filing, Cohen said if he’s called as witnesses in the lawsuit, “I will assert my 5th Amendment rights in connection with all proceedings in this case due to the ongoing criminal investigation by the F.B.I. and U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York.”

Cohen said he paid Daniels $130,000, which she said was meant to keep her quiet about claims that she had an affair with Trump in 2006.

By invoking the Fifth Amendment, Cohen won’t be subjected to depositions and be forced to disclose sensitive information that could be used against him in the criminal investigation.

Cohen to Invoke Fifth Amendment in Lawsuit by Stormy Daniels

Longtime Trump attorney Michael Cohen.

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

Michael Cohen, the longtime personal attorney of President Trump, plans to invoke his Fifth Amendment right to avoid testifying in a lawsuit filed against the president by pornographic film star known as Stormy Daniels.

Cohen, whose office, hotel room and home were raided by the FBI earlier this month as part of a criminal investigation by prosecutors in New York City, cited the probe in a court filing in California, where the lawsuit was filed, the New York Times reports

According to the filing, Cohen said if he’s called as witnesses in the lawsuit, “I will assert my 5th Amendment rights in connection with all proceedings in this case due to the ongoing criminal investigation by the F.B.I. and U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York.”

Cohen said he paid Daniels $130,000, which she said was meant to keep her quiet about claims that she had an affair with Trump in 2006.

By invoking the Fifth Amendment, Cohen won’t be subjected to depositions and be forced to disclose sensitive information that could be used against him in the criminal investigation.

Defense in Gov. Greitens Case Spending Considerable Time Attacking Ex-FBI Agent

Vince Wade is a former investigative TV reporter in Detroit and author and documentary producer in the Los Angeles area. His book, “Prisoner of War: The Story of White Boy Rick and the War on Drugs,” will be released on June 25. This column is being reposted with permission.

By Vince Wade

William Don Tisaby

In the Gov. Eric Greitens affair, the defense is spending considerable time attacking William Don Tisaby, a private investigator assisting St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner. A casual observer might conclude it is Tisaby who is facing charges, not the governor.

The Greitens defense team has attacked Tisaby as a tarnished former FBI agent who once engaged in bigamy and has since moved on to lying under oath in the Greitens case.

The Tisaby portrayed by the Greitens camp is not the one I know. I am a former TV news investigative reporter in Detroit. My work garnered three Emmys and the first place prize for Best Local Documentary in the New York Film Festival. I knew Tisaby as a special agent in the Detroit FBI. He is an important figure in an upcoming book I have written. It tells the story of a street-wise 14-year-old Detroit white kid, recruited by the FBI to spy on a ruthless black drug gang with City Hall connections. The boy’s bizarre tale is an example of why the War on Drugs has been a trillion-dollar policy failure. “White Boy Rick,” a film inspired by the boy’s story, will star Matthew McConaughey. It will be released in September.

Among First Black Agents

 Tisaby was among the first black agents hired when the FBI sought to shed its image as a mostly male, all-white police organization. To this day, some white male agents resent the inclusion of minorities and women in the special agent ranks.

When the FBI was given concurrent narcotics jurisdiction with the Drug Enforcement Administration in 1982, Tisaby was one of the first FBI agents to work drug investigations and he excelled at it. He made one of the first major FBI multidefendant drug conspiracy cases. In the 1980s, Tisaby worked undercover, gaining valuable intelligence about Detroit’s burgeoning narcotics underworld.

Tisaby also made enemies — in the FBI. Several white FBI supervisors and managers were miffed when Tisaby refused a command to enter an apartment to look for drugs without a proper search warrant. White agents did the “black bag job,” but the tainted search caused internal FBI problems. Tisaby was viewed by some white agents and managers as “difficult.”

Yet his accomplishments were such that New York Gov. Mario Cuomo personally hired him as the deputy state inspector general of substance abuse services. During this time, black FBI agents and support staff called Tisaby periodically for advice on discrimination complaints against the FBI. This didn’t win him friends among some whites in the bureau.

Helped DEA 

In the early ’90s, Tisaby returned to the FBI, where he helped found the National Drug Intelligence Center. Later, he was assigned to help the DEA remodel its “kingpin” program to mirror the protocols of the FBI’s major case program.

Agent Tisaby continued his advancement in the FBI and continued to provide guidance and counsel to FBI blacks on discrimination issues.

 I’m trying to reconcile the Tisaby I know, the one who made enemies inside the FBI for refusing to do an illegal drug search ordered by white agents, with the Tisaby who is now accused of lying about withholding notes related to a partially botched videotape interview with the alleged victim in the Greitens case.

I don’t know the gory details of Tisaby’s bitter, messy divorce, but it appears he wasn’t totally candid with FBI’s internal investigators about some related issues. That’s what got him in trouble in the FBI, not bigamy. He was disciplined but not fired.

The lightning and thunder the Greitens camp is hurling at Tisaby smacks of “Hey! Look over here!”

The poet Carl Sandburg once said of court cases, “If the facts are against you, argue the law. If the law is against you, argue the facts. If the law and the facts are against you, pound the table and yell like hell.”

The Greitens camp is yelling a lot.