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Justice Dept. Vows to Continue Probing 1964 KKK Killings of Civil Rights Workers

Good to know the statute of limitations does not apply to murder. Good to know the Justice Department hasn’t given up on this case. But it better step it up if it wants to eventually file charges before everyone dies off like Bill Wayne Posey.

fbi photo

fbi photo

By Jerry Mitchell
Jackson Clarion-Ledger
JACKSON, Miss. — Billy Wayne Posey, a key suspect in the Ku Klux Klan’s killings of three civil rights workers in 1964 in Mississippi, has died, but Justice Department officials say they’re continuing their investigation of the remaining suspects.

The 73-year-old Posey died Thursday of natural causes, according to friends. That leaves four living suspects in the June 21, 1964, killings of James Chaney, Andrew Goodman and Michael Schwerner in the Justice Department’s investigation.

Posey’s funeral is set for 3 p.m. today at Stephens Chapel in Philadelphia, with burial to follow in Henry’s Chapel Cemetery.

Alvin Sykes of Kansas City, architect of the bill authorizing the Justice Department’s new cold-case unit, emerged from a recent meeting with U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, saying Posey was their key suspect in the federal reinvestigation into the trio’s killings.

For Full Story

Internet Radio Host Case Tests Limits of Freedom of Speech

The Internet remains the wild west. Federal law enforcement is still trying to figure out exactly where the boundaries are for freedom of speech. Over the past few years, it’s been pretty much hit and miss.

Hal Turner/msnbc photo

Hal Turner/msnbc photo

By Peter Slevin
Washington Post Staff Writer
CHICAGO — Internet radio host Hal Turner disliked how three federal judges rejected the National Rifle Association’s attempt to overturn a pair of handgun bans.

“Let me be the first to say this plainly: These Judges deserve to be killed,” Turner wrote on his blog on June 2, according to the FBI. “Their blood will replenish the tree of liberty. A small price to pay to assure freedom for millions.”

The next day, Turner posted photographs of the appellate judges and a map showing the Chicago courthouse where they work, noting the placement of “anti-truck bomb barriers.” When an FBI agent appeared at the door of his New Jersey home, Turner said he meant no harm.

He is now behind bars awaiting trial, accused of threatening the judges and deemed by a U.S. magistrate as too dangerous to be free.

For Full Story

A Conversation With OK U.S. Atty. John Richter Who Steps Down Friday

Ex-FBI Agent Jack Borden Going Strong as Private Atty at Age 101

weatherford-tex-map

Jack Borden, who was an FBI agent in the 1940s, is still going strong as a private attorney at 101. Impressive feat. Impressive man.

By DAVID FLICK
The Dallas Morning News
WEATHERFORD, Tex. – At 101 years old, Jack Borden often gets asked two questions: What’s the secret to a long life? and When are you going to give up chewing tobacco?

He dismisses the first (“Not dying”) and simply ignores the second.

“I’ve been hearing for 91 years that it’s going to kill me,” he said, projecting juice into a brass spittoon by his desk. “When you’re old, you have to have something to give you pleasure.”

For Full Story

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlXmz4LKZTA

An Amusing Tale of How a Son Wrote J. Edgar Hoover to Help his FBI Agent Dad

Washington Post magazine

Washington Post Sunday magazine

A young son wanted to help his overworked dad who was an FBI agent. So he secretly wrote J. Edgar Hoover to get help. The rest is a very amusing story.

By Anthony Edward Schiappa Jr.
Washington Post Sunday Magazine

I grew up revering two men: J. Edgar Hoover and my dad. I was elated when Dad joined the FBI in 1962; it was as if the Yankees had hired him to pitch. My father had been job-hopping, having worked at five newspapers over the previous eight years. While my parents were pleased with the job security and benefits of the FBI, I had ecstatic visions of my father as a commie-fighting, crime-busting G-man. John Dillinger, the Karpis-Barker gang and “Machine Gun” Kelly were as familiar to me as Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris. “The FBI Story” was the first book longer than a comic book I ever read. When I was 7 years old, I couldn’t name the president, but I knew

who the director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation was. I still have letters my father wrote during his training at the FBI Academy in Quantico: “Daddy is working and studying very hard to become a good FBI agent. I will be home in August and I will show you my badge and my gun.” What could be cooler?

J. Edgar Hoover/fbi photo

J. Edgar Hoover/fbi photo

Through my boyhood eyes, my father personified the FBI motto of Fidelity, Bravery, Integrity. Six feet tall with looks like Cary Grant, he made the dark suit, white shirt, subdued tie and homburg hat of FBI fame appear stylish. As my father’s new-agent training report noted, “This man makes a very substantial initial impression.” Reticent, he wielded the driest of wits. He signed my fifth-grade autograph book: “To my son, Eddie; may his father lead a long and prosperous life.”

As for Hoover, his career turned out to be stunningly inconsistent. His leadership alternated between brilliant and boneheaded; his tremendous accomplishments sometimes have been overshadowed by his idiosyncrasies. Forty years ago, my family got a taste of the best and worst that Hoover had to offer.

To Read the Rest

Weekend Series on History: Rise and Fall of Mobster John Gotti

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQccyQbCHEg

Convicted Priest Called Before Fed Grand Jury Probing LA Archdiocese Cardinal’s Handling of Abuse

The scandal that ripped through the Catholic church is not over. And anyone, regardless of rank, should be held accountable for committing acts or covering them up.

Cardinal Roger Mahoney/ archdiocese photo

Cardinal Roger Mahoney/ archdiocese photo

By Richard Winton
Los Angeles Times
LOS ANGELES — A former Los Angeles priest convicted of molesting boys has been called before a federal grand jury investigating how the L.A. archdiocese and Cardinal Roger Mahony handled priest abuse cases, a source told The Times.

Former priest Michael Stephen Baker informed Mahony two decades ago of his abusive acts but was allowed to remain in the ministry.

His case has become a symbol of how the church transferred priests who abused young boys. He is now in U.S. federal custody, said the source, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because the case is ongoing.

For Full Story

It’s About Time: New Orleans Hires Ex-Fed Prosecutor and Another Atty to Deal With Ethics and Fed Probes

Better late than never. New Orleans could have used something like this a long long long time ago.

David Laufman/law photo

David Laufman/law office photo

Karen Sloan
National Law Journal

New Orleans has hired two attorneys from New York’s Kelley Drye & Warren to advise it on ethical issues and regarding a myriad of federal investigations targeting the city.

Washington-based partner David Laufman will lead the firm’s efforts with the assistance of associate Andrew Wein, according to the city contract. Laufman, formerly an assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Virginia, specializes in white collar crime and federal investigations.

“In essence, I will help guide the city with its compliance through the course of this investigative action,” Laufman said. “I have counseled many individuals and companies grappling with investigations, but this is the first time I’ve provided this type of advice to a municipality.”

Laufman’s contract with the city extends from August through the end of October, and it appears there will be no lack of work. Federal authorities are investigating at least three matters involving City Hall, according to reports by The Times-Picayune of New Orleans and other published accounts.

For Full Story