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Of 1,997 Civil Rights Complaints Against Justice Dept., Only One Investigated

justice dept. logoBy Matt Castello
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — A report released Tuesday showed that 1,997 civil rights complaints were filed against Justice Department employees during the first six months of 2010, but only one was investigated by the Inspector General’s Office.

The report issued by the Justice Department’s Inspector General said 1,815 of the complaints “did not fall within the OIG’s (Office of the Inspector General) jurisdiction or did not warrant further investigation.”

Of the 1,997 complaints, the Inspector General found that 182 required further review. At the same time, the Inspector General referred six of those complaints to the Federal Bureau of Prisons for further investigation.

The lone investigation that was pursued involved the alleged assault of a Muslim inmate. Abrasions were found on his head, left shoulder, knees and ankles during a medical assessment after U.S. Marshals Service turned him over to authorities.

In the two prior Inspector General reports, three investigations were initiated. All three involved the alleged mistreatment of Muslim inmates. The Inspector General deemed one as unsubstantiated.

The Department of Justice did not immediately respond to calls seeking comment.

Breaking News: Jury in Blago Case Says it’s Hung

Ex-Gov. Blago while in office/official photo

Ex-Gov. Blago while in office/official photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The federal jury in the public corruption case of Ex-Ill. Gov. Rod Blagojevich has told the judge its is deadlocked on all counts, according to the Chicago News Cooperative.

The Associated Press reported that they appeared to be hung on just some counts.

The jurors sent a note to the judge asking for guidance. The judge said he needed more clarification, the news cooperative reported. The judge summarized the content of the note in open court around 4:15, Chicago time.

“In a situation where jurors can’t agree on given counts, what should the next logical step be?” the jurors asked, according to the Chicago Sun-Times. “We’ve gone beyond reasonable attempts without rancor.”

The jury has been deliberating for 11 days. Blagojevich was indicted on 24 counts including allegations that he tried to sell the Senate seat vacated by President Obama.

Az. Sheriffs Call Visit by ICE’s John Morton “Political Stunt”

John Morton

John Morton

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

These have not been fun days for John Morton, who heads up U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The union representing ICE agents just issued a vote of “no confidence” for him.  And on Tuesday, two key sheriffs along the Arizona-Mexico border sharply criticized him.

The sheriffs, according to the Washington Times, called Morton’s planned visit to Arizona on Wednesday a “political stunt” and claimed it was the Obama administration’s attempt to “cover up its inaction in protecting our borders,” the Washington Times reported.

“The administration blew past their promised Aug. 1 deadline to send 524 National Guard troops to Arizona, and now they are trying to appear concerned by sending the ICE director, who recently received a vote of ‘no confidence’ by ICE’s union,” Arizona Sheriffs Paul Babeu of Pinal County and Larry Dever of Cochise County said in a statement, the Washington Times reported.

The paper said ICE did not respond for comment.

Chicago Jurors Still Going at it in Ex-Gov. Blagojevich Case

Ex-Gov on NBC's Celebrity Apprentice

Ex-Gov on NBC's Celebrity Apprentice

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Can you say Day 11?

Well, Wednesday marks the 11th day jurors will deliberate in the federal public corruption case against the over-chatty ex-Ill. Gov. Rod Blagojevich in downtown Chicago.

The Associated Press reports that U.S. District Judge James Zagel told attorneys on Tuesday that he’s heard nothing from the jurors as of late.

The last note jurors sent to the judge was July 30. If we could only stick a camera in the jury room we’d have a pretty good reality TV show.

Georgia ATF Undercover Operation Nets 245 Guns and 89 Defendants

U.S. Atty. Edward Tarver/campaign photo

U.S. Atty. Edward Tarver

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Undercover ATF agents purchased 245 firearms from people in Glynn County, Ga., including a number of convicted felons, resulting in federal and state charges against 89 people, the agency announced Tuesday.

Dubbed “Operation Thunderbolt”, undercover agents over a nine month period purchased 245 firearms, including handguns, rifles, assault rifles and sawed-off shotguns along with about $200,000 worth of illegal drugs, including more than 3 pounds of cocaine, over 1,500 ecstasy pills, over 800 oxycodone pills and a quantity of methadone, ATF said.

ATF said a number of guns purchased by agents appeared to be stolen.

“Operation Thunderbolt was a bold effort to protect public safety by removing violent criminals who sell guns and drugs within our communities,” U.S. Attorney Edward Tarver said.

Opinions Mixed Inside FBI Over Test Cheating Scandal

Robert Mueller/fbi photo

FBI Dir. Robert S. Mueller III/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
For AOL News

WASHINGTON — To cheat or not to cheat on an open-book exam.

That is no longer an issue among FBI agents around the country now that the test is long over. Now the question is, should those who did cheat on the FBI exam last year — and they could number in the hundreds — be punished? Opinions inside the bureau are mixed and plentiful.

“I think someone should get punished,” one FBI agent, who asked not to be identified, told AOL News, adding that the instructions for the test on bureau procedures were clear: You had to take it by yourself. “There are agents who worked hard and took the test on their own. There’s no excuse.”

But others disagree, including one agent who said it was “just goofy” to be accused of cheating on an open-book, multiple-choice exam. Another agent concurred, saying “the whole test is a joke” and that some employees may have found the test-taking instructions confusing and should simply be required to retake the exam if they collaborated with others.

To read more click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens Dies in Plane Crash: Final Leg of Life Was Bumpy Including Fed Indictment

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens during his last campaign

Ex-Sen. Ted Stevens during his last campaign

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The final leg of ex-Alaska Sen. Ted Stevens’ life was a bumpy one filled with misfortune and fortune.

He was convicted on federal public corruption charges, but fortunately for him,  the case was tossed out for prosecutorial misconduct.  He lost a bid for re-election after 40 years in the Senate. And then on Monday, he was among five people who died in a plane crash in remote Southwest Alaska.

The Anchorage Daily News on Tuesday reported the death, saying three others aboard survived.

Stevens, 86, who was considered a dogged advocate for Alaska, landed in big trouble after federal authorities indicted him in July 2008 on public corruption charges.  On Oct. 27,  days before the election, he was convicted. He went on to lose his bid for re-election.

But fortune returned. Five months later,  the Justice Department moved to dismiss the case on the grounds of prosecutorial misconduct. Simply put: the case was a disaster and an utter embarrassment for the government.

Engineer Guilty of Selling Military Secrets to China

Honolulu_mapBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A former engineer who worked on the B-2 Stealth bomb was convicted in Honolulu Monday of selling military secrets to China to help that nation develop a stealth cruise missile, the Associated Press reported.

Authorities said the engineer, Noshir Gowadia,66, pocketed at least $110,000 from the transactions and used the money to pay the mortgage on a multimillion-dollar ocean-view home on Maui’s north shore, AP reported.

He had been in federal custody since 2005. His lawyers had argued that the materials he gave to China came from unclassified and public information, AP reported.

“Mr. Gowadia provided some of our country’s most sensitive weapons-related designs to the Chinese government for money,” U.S. Attorney David Kris said in a statement.

“Today, he is being held accountable for his actions. This prosecution should serve as a warning to others who would compromise our nation’s military secrets for profit.”