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Snapping Pictures of an Approaching Thunderstorm Raised Suspicions of Volunteer Photographer

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 Why would anyone be snapping photos of a storm brewing in Houston, Texas?

The FBI was concerned enough to question photographer Michael Galindo about the Sept. 13 pictures near a refinery, reports Opposing Views.

Galindo said the answer was simple enough: He was volunteering for the National Weather Service.

After someone at the refinery called the FBI, an agent who was investigating allegedly told Galindo that he clearly wasn’t a threat, “but just be careful next time,” Opposing Views reports.

Slain Border Patrol Agent in Arizona Remembered During Funeral As New Details Emerge

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 A Border Patrol agent killed by apparent friendly fire along the Mexico border in Arizona was remembered during a poignant funeral Monday, Reuters reports.

“Our best wishes and prayers continue for the other agents involved in the incident, that they may experience healing and peace. We honor all who serve in the Border Patrol, carrying out an extremely difficult task under harsh conditions,” the family of Nicholas Ivie, 30, said in a statement issued late on Sunday.

The death underscores the dangers facing Border Patrol agents, four of whom died in less than two years in Arizona, according to Reuters.

According to more recent investigations, Ivie believed he had encountered an armed smuggler and opened fire. Two other agents, believing the same thing, returned fire, Reuters reported.

Funeral services began after a horse-drawn carriage carried Ivie’s coffin through Sierra Vista to a Mormon church.

Deadly crossing: Death toll rises among those desperate for the American Dream

By Hannah Rappleye and Lisa Riordan Seville
NBC News

In the freezer of a small funeral home nearly 13 miles from the Texas-Mexico border, 22 bodies are stacked on plywood shelves, one on top of the other.

The bodies wrapped in white sheets have names, families and official countries of origin — Honduras, El Salvador, Mexico, sometimes China or Pakistan. The bodies in black shrouds are the remains of the nameless and unclaimed, waiting to be identified.

For the past few years, the family-owned Elizondo Mortuary and Cremation Service in Mission, Texas, has been taking in the remains of undocumented immigrants found dead in nearby counties after crossing the border from Mexico. This year, however, they had to build an extra freezer. It’s become difficult to keep up with the rising tide of dead coming to them from across the Rio Grande Valley.

To read more click here.

DEA Leads Biggest Meth Bust in New York History

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 New York has had its share of big drug busts.

But when it comes to methamphetamine, the state has never seen a bigger one than the 50 pounds seized from a boardinghouse in Westchester County, CBS New York reports.

The DEA called it the biggest meth bust in New York State history.

About $1 million worth of the dangerous drug was discovered as Mexican cartels try to carve a larger market for meth, CBS New York reports.

The bust netted two arrests, while agents search for the chemist.

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Column: Ex-Detroit Mayor Kilpatrick Finds Trial Almost Laughable: I Find it Depressing

Ex-Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick/official photo

By Allan Lengel
For Deadline Detroit

DETROIT — The other day ex-Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick tweeted: “If this case was in another State, not paid for by taxpayers, & my life was not on the line, this ish would be laughable.”

Well, yes, perhaps almost laughable for Kwame.

Depressing for the rest of us.

For the past two weeks, the government has delivered some damaging testimony in his public corruption trial. Ultimately it will be up to the jury to decide if Kwame walks or sulks behind bars for many years. If convicted, count on him going off to prison for at least 12 years. I don’t sense this judge has a lot sympathy for the defense.

As an observer, the longer I watch the trial, the more I can’t help but see Kwame as man who reigned supremely over this impoverished kingdom, whose concerns about living a lavish lifestyle overrode his concerns of his subjects.

I’m not laughing.

To read full column click here.

 

National Geographic Launches Show Monday Night: “To Catch a Smuggler”

 
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The National Geographic Channel launches its new series Monday night at 9 p.m. “To Catch a Smuggler.”

The show takes viewers behind the scenes at JFK International Airport with agents from U.S. Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement, who are looking for drugs, weapon and contraband, according to a press statement.

More than 20,000 international passengers come through JFK daily.

 

Laser Attacks on Pilots Prompt FBI to Create Nationwide Crackdown

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

 To crackdown on the increasing number of people pointing at pilots, the FBI has created a national Anti-Laser Attack Task Force, Gizmodo.com reports.

Since 2005, so-called laser attacks, which can temporarily blind a pilot, are up 10 fold, the technology site reported.

In fact, the FBI expects 3,700 more attacks by year’s end.

Since 2008, the FBI’s Sacramento division has run a successful campaign to crack down on laser attacks, prompting the bureau to create a nationwide effort, according to Gizmodo.com.

If convicted, laser-wielders face up to five years in prison and up to $11,000 in fines.

Feds to Begin Testing Wider Use of Drones That Could Have Widespread Ramifications

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 The Department of Homeland Security will test drones – small, unmanned flying spies – to see if they can be used for emergencies, law enforcement and border patrol, Wired.com reports.

The testing grounds will be Fort Sill in Oklahoma, where drones will officials will experiment with drones for five days, according to Wired.com.

The drones being researched are small and weigh less than 25 pounds.

The drones are controversial because of fears that they violate privacy rights or could crash into buildings, Wired.com reports.

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