Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

July 2021
S M T W T F S
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Archive for July, 2021

Jeffrey R. Downey Named Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s El Paso Field Office

FBI Special Agent in Charge Jeffery R. Downey

By Steve Neavling

Jeffery R. Downey, who was serving as a section chief for the Critical Incident Response Group for the FBI, has been named special agent in charge of the El Paso Field Office in Texas. 

Downey’s career as a special agent with the FBI began in 2003, when he was assigned to the Buffalo Field Office in New York. He was transferred to the Augusta Resident Agency of the Atlanta Field Office in 2006. In both field offices, Downey investigated violent crime, gang, criminal enterprise, and public corruption investigations. 

In 2007, Downey worked an 18-month assignment as a supervisory special agent in the Criminal Investigative Division at FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C., working on the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Fusion Center Task Force. 

In 2009, Downey moved to the Detroit Field Office, where he was promoted to supervisory special agent and put in charge of the Organized Crime Squad. A year later, he began supervising the office’s Public Corruption and Civil Rights Squad. In 2013, Downey became the senior supervisory resident agent in charge of the Oakland County Resident Agency. 

In 2016, Downey was promoted to assistant special agent in charge of the Detroit office, where he oversaw the criminal, crisis management, and mission services branches, which included specialty teams such as SWAT, the special agent bomb technicians, the crisis negotiators, and the Evidence Response Team. 

In 2020, Downey returned to FBI headquarters as section chief of CIRG’s Crisis Management and Intelligence Coordination Section. 

Before joining the bureau, Downey served as a special agent with the Secret Service. He earned a bachelor’s degree from John Carroll University.  

‘Not Necessary:” CBP Cancels Two Border Wall Contracts in Laredo Section

Construction of a border wall under the Trump administration, via CBP.

By Steve Neavling

U.S. Customs and Border Protection terminated two border wall contracts in the Laredo Sector, arguing the roughly 31 miles of barriers are “not necessary to address any life, safety, environmental, or other remediation requirements.”

Homeland Security made the announcement Friday and said it is reviewing other unfinished or yet-to-be-started wall projects.

In addition, the Biden administration is calling on Congress to terminate any remaining border wall funding in favor of “smarter border security measures, like border technology and modernization of land ports of entry, that are proven to be more effective at improving safety and security at the border.”

The 31 miles of walls are the first to be canceled under the Biden administration. No land had been acquired for those projects. 

On June 11, Homeland Security released the agency’s plan for using funds previously allocated for border walls.

Janeen DiGuiseppi Named Special Agent in Charge of FBI’s Albany Field Office

Special FBI Agent Janeen DiGuiseppi

By Steve Neavling

Janeen DiGuiseppi, who was serving as the deputy assistant director of the FBI’s Training Division, has been named special agent in charge of the bureau’s Albany Field Office in New York. 

DiGuisepp’s career as an FBI special agent began in 1999, when she was assigned to the Salt Lake City Field Office, investigating violent crimes, drugs and public corruption.

In 2008, DiGuiseppi became assistant legal attaché in Baghdad and supervised the FBI’s Major Crimes Task Force. She returned to Salt Lake City a year later and was assigned to the DEA’s Drug Diversion Task Force.

In 2010, she was promoted to supervisory special agent as the FBI’s biometric lead in Kabul, Afghanistan.

In 2012, DiGuiseppi supervised the civil rights and public corruption programs and the Violent Crimes Against Children/Child Exploitation Task Force at the Memphis Field Office in Tennessee.

In 2014, she became assistant section chief of the Public Corruption and Civil Rights Section in the Criminal Investigative Division at FBI headquarters before serving as the chief of staff to the division’s assistant director. 

In 2016, DiGuiseppi was named assistant section chief of the Transnational Organized Crime – Eastern Hemisphere Section, managing domestic and international programs with a focus on organized crime and major theft.

In 2017, DiGuiseppi was named assistant special agent in charge in the Denver Field Office, where she oversaw the intelligence and surveillance programs, the Rocky Mountain Regional Computer Forensic Laboratory, and the Wyoming resident agencies.

In 2019, DiGuiseppi became section chief of the FBI Training Division’s Curriculum Management Section and was promoted to deputy assistant director a year later.

Ms. DiGuiseppi received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Central Florida, a master’s degree from Western New England College, and a master’s degree from Florida International University. Before joining the bureau,  DiGuiseppi served as an officer in the United States Air Force

Weekend Series on Crime History: A 1941 Documentary on the FBI

Couple Busted with Block of Cocaine Concealed as Marble Cake, Maine DEA Says

This deceptive cake contained 4 pounds of cocaine. Photo: Maine DEA.

By Steve Neavling

A drug-sniffing dog helped authorities in Maine bust a couple who disguised 4 pounds of cocaine as a marble cake in shiny blue packaging. 

Law enforcement officers were acting on a tip when they pulled over a car in Gardiner, Maine, this week and found the deceptive cake, which included coffee founds to cover up the scent, the Maine Drug Enforcement Agency said in a news release.

The cocaine has a street value of $200,000.

Police also seized about $1,900 in cash, which authorities believe was from drug sales. 

John Cedeno, 25, of New York, and Chelsy Cochran, 33, of Winslow, Maine, were arrested and charged with drug trafficking. 

Cocaine disguised as cake, with cash from suspect drug sales. Photo: Maine DEA.

DOJ Launches Strike Forces to Combat Gun Violence in 5 Metro Areas

File photo of guns, via ATF

By Steve Neavling

The Justice Department on Thursday launched an ambitious new initiative to reduce gun violence by cracking down on firearm tracking in five metropolitan areas. 

The cross-jurisdictional strike forces will focus on New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Washington D.C. and the San Francisco and Sacramento region. 

U.S. attorneys will lead the effort and work with the ATF and local and state law enforcement agencies.

The plan is to use data, evidence and intelligence gathered at crime scenes to “identify patterns, leads, and potential suspects in violent gun crimes,” the Justice Department said in a news release.

“All too often, guns found at crime scenes come from hundreds or even thousands of miles away,” Attorney General Merrick B. Garland said. “We are redoubling our efforts as ATF works with law enforcement to track the movement of illegal firearms used in violent crimes. These strike forces enable sustained coordination across multiple jurisdictions to help disrupt the worst gun trafficking corridors. The Department of Justice will use all of its tools – enforcement, prevention, intervention, and investment – to help ensure the safety of our communities – the department’s highest priority.”

The strike forces are part of the DOJ’s “Violent Crime Reduction Strategy,” which was announced in May.

Justice Department Seeks to Restore Independence from White House

Attorney General Merrick Garland. (Photo: DOJ)

By Steve Neavling

Attorney General Merrick Garland issued a directive Wednesday that seeks to limit contacts between the Justice Department and the White House, marking a significant departure from the Trump era. 

In the memo, Garland said the Justice Department “will not advise the White House concerning pending or contemplated criminal or civil law enforcement investigations or cases unless doing so is important for the performance of the President’s duties and appropriate from a law enforcement perspective,” The Wall Street Journal reports.

The memo made exceptions for matters of national security and foreign relations. 

The guidelines are in stark contrast to Trump’s White House, which repeatedly sought to influence the DOJ and stay abreast of the department’s criminal investigations and cases.

The wording of the memo is similar to a 2009 memo issued by then-attorney General Eric Holder. Although that memo remained in effect during Trump’s term, he continually violated the language. 

In a related memo on Wednesday, the White House instructed its staff to avoid contact with departments or agencies about investigations unless given approval. 

Michael J. Driscoll Named Assistant Director of New York Field Office

Special FBI Agent Michael J. Driscoll.

By Steve Neavling

Michael J. Driscoll, who most recently headed the FBI’s Philadelphia Field Office, has been named assistant director of the New York Field Office. 

Driscoll is no stranger to the New York Field Office, where he began his career as a special agent in 1996, investigating terrorism cases. He helped investigate al Qaeda conspirators involved in the 1998 bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania and the 9/11 attacks. 

Driscoll earned an Attorney General’s Award for Distinguished Service in 2002 for his work on the al Qaeda cases and the 1998 embassy bombings.

In 2003, Driscoll was transferred to FBI headquarters to serve as the bureau’s representative to the al Qaeda Department of the CIA’s Counterterrorism Center.

In 2005, Driscoll returned to the New York Field Office, where he headed the squad tasked with extraterritorial investigations in Africa. He also led the FBI’s counterterrorism efforts in the New York Hudson Valley region and was later promoted to the coordinating supervisory special agent for New York’s Counterterrorism Program.

In 2013, Driscoll was named assistant legal attaché for London, where he oversaw the Cyber Program and working closely with U.K. law enforcement and intelligence services. In 2016, he became assistant special agent in charge of Philadelphia’s counterintelligence and cyber programs.

In 2018, he returned to FBI headquarters, serving as the chief of the Violent Crime Section, which leads the FBI’s Crimes Against Children Program, as well as efforts to combat violent crime and gang-related violence.

In 2019, Driscoll was promoted to special agent in charge of New York’s Criminal Division and later began to lead New York’s Counterintelligence and Cyber Division.

Driscoll was named special agent in charge of the Philadelphia Field Office in 2020. 

Before joining the FBI, Driscoll worked as an attorney in commercial litigation. He’s a graduate of the State University of New York in Albany, and he received his law degree from Hofstra University School of Law in Hempstead, N.Y.

The FBI announced three other appointments on Wednesday.

Jennifer L. Moore was named assistant director of the Security Division at FBI headquarters. Christine O’Neill was named assistant director of the Human Resources Division at FBI’s headquarters. And Timothy M. Dunham was named assistant director of the Training Division.