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Archive for December 30th, 2020

Convicted U.S. Spy Jonathan Pollard Lands in Israel

By Allan Lengel

Jonathan Pollard, the former U.S. Navy analyst who spent 30 years in prison for spying for Israel, has flown to Tel Aviv a month after a travel ban imposed by the government ended, the BBC reports.

Pollard, 66, and his wife Esther, were greeted early Wednesday at the airport by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Jonathan Pollard/wikipedia

Pollard was arrested in 1985 in Washington, D.C., and was given a life sentence after pleading guilty to selling U.S. secrets to Israel, which initially denied that he was spying for the Jewish nation.

Ten years later, Israel admitted Pollard was working for the country.

Pollard was released from prison in 2015, but had a ban on traveling for at least five years under a ban by the government.

Border Patrol Agents Save Man’s Life in Arizona

Border Patrol agents save a man’s life, via CBP.

By Steve Neavling

Border Patrol agents from the Yuma Sector are credited with saving a man’s life after he was found unconscious near the Andrade Port of Entry in Arizona. 

A Border Patrol agent was driving along Andrade Road at 3 a.m. when he spotted a 60-year-old man on the ground. He stopped to help the man and called other agents who are registered EMTs. He also called for an ambulance. 

EMTs provided oxygen to the man, who had labored breathing and a weak pulse. Suspecting a narcotic overdose, they administered NARCAN. 

Rural Metro medics arrived shortly after and provided him with medical treatment. The man regained consciousness after medics administered an additional treatment of NARCAN. 

At the Yuma Sector, 62 agents are trained as EMTs, and an additional five are working on their certification, Border Patrol said in a news release

“The life-saving efforts displayed by the Yuma Station Border Patrol agents and EMTs is a testament to their commitment to serve the general public in their time of need,” Yuma Station’s Acting Patrol Agent in Charge Kyle Harvick said. “Border security provides a safer community in many aspects. This incident and the care provided by the Yuma Station EMTs is just one of many examples. We hope the subject involved in this incident experiences a healthy recovery.”

Police, FBI Warned about Nashville Bombing suspect in 2019

Anthony Quinn Warner

By Steve Neavling

Police and the FBI were alerted to Nashville bombing suspect Anthony Quinn Warner about 16 months ago, when his girlfriend reported he was building explosives in his RV, according to a police report obtained by The Tennessean.

But it doesn’t appear that anything was done to stop Warner, who authorities say died in the Christmas Day explosion that tore through downtown Nashville and injured three people. 

In August 2019, Warner’s girlfriend notified Nashville police that Warner “was building bombs in the RV trailer at his residence,” the Metro Nashville Police Department (MNPD) report states.

The information was passed on to the FBI. 

“She related that the guns belonged to a ‘Tony Warner’ and that she did not want them in the house any longer,” MNPD spokesman Don Aaron said in a statement to The Tennessean.

The woman’s attorney, Raymond Throckmorton III, told police that Warner “frequently talks about the military and bomb making,” the report states. The attorney added that Warner “knows what he is doing and is capable of making a bomb.”

Police went to Warner’s home to investigate but no one answered the door, and the RV was fenced off behind the house. 

“They saw no evidence of a crime and had no authority to enter his home or fenced property,” MNPD spokesman Don Aaron told the Tennessean. 

A day later, Nashville police forwarded the information to the FBI to check the bureau’s databases, Aaron said. Later in the day, “the FBI reported back that they checked their holdings and found no records on Warner at all,” Aaron said. 

“Somebody, somewhere dropped the ball,” Throckmorton said.

Aaron responded that there was no evidence of wrongdoing at the time. 

“At no time was there any evidence of a crime detected and no additional action was taken,” he said. “No additional information about Warner came to the department’s or the FBI’s attention after August 2019.”