Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

November 2020
S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Archive for November, 2020

FBI Task Force Captures Fugitive on the Run for Nearly 50 Years

Leonard Rayne Moses.

By Steve Neavling

The FBI’s Detroit Fugitive Task Force tracked down and arrested a man who had been on the run for nearly 50 years after escaping custody in Pennsylvania. 

Leonard Rayne Moses, now 71, was serving a life sentence for first-degree murder when he fled during his grandmother’s funeral in Pittsburgh, Pa., on June 1, 1971. 

During the 1968 Pittsburgh riots in the wake of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, Moses and four friends tossed Molotov cocktail into a home in Pittsburgh, severely burning 72-year-old Mary Amplo, who died three months later. 

At the time, Moses was 15. He was sentenced to life in prison at the age of 17. 

While on the run, Moses assumed the identity of Paul Dickson and until at least 1999 he was a traveling pharmacist in Michigan. 

“I hope this arrest brings some closure to the family members of Mary Amplo, who was killed back in 1968,” FBI Pittsburgh Special Agent in Charge Michael Christman said in a statement. “Mr. Moses will now have to face justice for her murder. Through coordination with the Allegheny County Sheriff’s Office and our partners in Michigan, we were able to identify Mr. Moses using the FBI’s Next Generation Identification system. It’s these new advances in technology that the FBI must continue to identify and use to make sure those who commit crimes are brought to justice.”

Federal Judge Rules Wolf Was Unlawfully Appointed to Head Homeland Security

Acting Homeland Security Director Chad Wolf testifies before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee.

By Steve Neavling

A federal judge ruled Saturday that Chad Wolf, the acting Homeland Security secretary, was unlawfully appointed to his position and therefore lacked authority to limit work permits under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA).

U.S. District Judge Nicholas Garaufis of the Eastern District of New York found that Wolf’s memo limiting the work permits of undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children was invalid, The Washington Post reports.

Garaufis said Wolf appeared to be serving in his role unlawfully because his appointment failed to follow established law.

In September, another judge blocked the Trump administration’s new asylum restrictions because Wolf appeared to lack the authority to introduce them.

The latest ruling raises questions about Wolf’s ability to implement policies in the final months of Trump’s presidency. 

Homeland Security has defended Wolf’s appointment, saying he is serving lawfully. 

Weekend Series on Crime: Despite Pandemic Mexico’s Cartels are as Dangerous as Ever

More Than 130 Secret Service Officers Have Covid or Are Quarantining

By Allan Lengel

More than 130 Secret Service officers who protect the White House and the president during his travels have tested positive for Covid or are quarantining because of exposure to co-workers, the Washington Post reports.

The spread of the virus is believed to be partly linked to a series of campaign rallies that President Trump held in the weeks before the Nov. 3 election, the Post reports, citing anonymous sources.

The news comes as the country battles a surging virus that shows no signs of easing at the moment.

ICE Operation Nets 113 Arrests of Alleged Child Predators in U.S., South America

ICE authorities investigating child predators. Photo via ICE.

By Steve Neavling

ICE and its international partners arrested 113 alleged child predators in the U.S. and South America as part of a crackdown called “Operation Protected Childhood.”

The operation focused on distributors and producers of child pornography from the U.S. and Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, and Panama. In the U.S., ICE executed child exploitation-related search warrants in Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Tennessee, California, Colorado and Florida. 

“This collaborative effort by ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations and its foreign law enforcement partners has put dangerous criminals behind bars and, most importantly, has led to the rescue of innocent children,” Robert Fuentes Jr., ICE attaché for Brazil and Bolivia, said in a statement. “Thank you to our Brazilian partners for their unwavering efforts over the last five years to combat child exploitation through Operation Protected Childhood. And to our partners who have most recently joined our operation, we look forward to the continued fight and relentless effort to put a stop to this horrific crime.”  

Launched in 2015, OPC works in partnership with the Brazil Ministry of Justice and the Public Security (MJSP) Secretariat for Integrated Operation (SEOPI) Cyber Laboratory.

During the arrests, officials found thousands of images of child pornography. Investigators tracked down the suspects using social media and cell phone apps. 

Two Top Homeland Security Officials Forced to Resign Amid Trump Purge

By Steve Neavling

Two top Homeland Security officials have been forced to resign by the White House as President Trump continues to remove anyone who hasn’t demonstrated “complete loyalty.” 

Bryan Ware, a senior policy aide at the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, and Valerie Boyd, the top official for international affairs at Homeland Security, are the latest national security officials to resign under pressure, The Washington Post reports.

“They’re looking for complete loyalty, and someone with experience serving different administrations is not perceived as sufficiently loyal,” one person who spoke on the condition of anonymity told The Post

Boyd previously served in the administrations of Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama. 

In her resignation letter, Boyd told acting secretary Chad Wolf that she hopes the administration will “act with honor” by creating a peaceful transition to a new presidency. 

“It has been my belief that people of character should support the institution of the Presidency and work within it to inform and influence policy decisions that reflect well on the people’s government,” Boyd wrote. “This belief has been tested many times these past few years, and it is my fervent prayer that I made the best possible choices. I wish you and our colleagues across the government the strength to act with honor in the months ahead.”

Ware told The Post, “I’m proud of the work that I did. I’m proud of what the agency accomplished and proud to have had the privilege to serve the country.”

Neither the White House nor Homeland Security would comment. 

Contenders for AG, Homeland Security Director Under Biden

Joe Biden, via Shutterstock.com.

By Steve Neavling

President-elect Joe Biden will be responsible for choosing new leaders of the Justice Department and Homeland Security. 

Who are the potential contenders? The New York Times takes a look at the possible picks.

Under President Trump, the Homeland Security Department has been a revolving door of leaders. Biden hopes to change that. One contender is Val Demings, a member of Congress from Florida and a former Orlando police chief with 27 years of experience in law enforcement. 

Another potential pick is Alejandro Mayorkas a Cuban American lawyer who ran Citizenship and Immigration Services under President Obama. 

A contender to replace Attorney General William Barr is Xavier Becerra, a former congressman and current California attorney general. 

Another potential pick is Sen. Dough Jones, D-Alabama. He’s a former prosecutor and lost his bid for reelection to the Senate. 

Biden also could choose Tom Prez, the Democratic Party chairman who previously served as secretary of labor and assistant attorney general for civil rights. 

Former U.S. Attorney and Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates under Obama is another possibility. President Trump fired her after she served 10 days as acting attorney general. 

Georgia Man Charged with Shining Laser at Commercial Aircraft

By Steve Neavling

A 48-year-old Georgia man has been indicted on federal charges after the FBI said he shined a laser pointer at three commercial airplanes headed to Savannah-Hilton Head International Airport. 

A federal grand jury indicted Roger Floyd Hendricks, of Rincon, on three counts of aiming a laser pointer at an aircraft. He faces up to five years in prison on each count.

“Pointing a laser at an aircraft is not a prank; it’s incredibly dangerous and stupid,” Bobby L. Christine, U.S. attorney for the Southern District of Georgia, said in a statement. “The FBI did an outstanding job of locating and stopping this threat to hundreds of Savannah air travelers.”

The Federal Aviation Administration in February asked the FBI for help tracking down whoever was responsible for three green laser strikes on inbound aircraft. 

The strikes included:

  • A Nov. 27, strike on Commutair flight 4935 from Chicago O’Hare International Airport. The aircraft, an Embraer ERJ-145, has a capacity of more than 50 passengers and crew.
  • A Dec. 8  strike on Delta flight 697 from Hartsfield International Airport in Atlanta. The aircraft, an Airbus A321, has a capacity of up to nearly 200 passengers and crew.
  • A Jan. 14 strike on NetJets flight 385 from Chicago Midway International Airport. The aircraft, a Cessna Citation Sovereign, has a capacity of eight passengers plus crew. 

Each plane landed safely. 

Nationwide, there have been more than than 6,000 laser strikes on aircraft in the U.S., according to the FAA.

“Aiming a laser at an airplane is not a game, it’s a federal felony and something the FBI takes very seriously,” Chris Hacker, special agent in charge of FBI’s Atlanta Field Office, said. “These alleged actions placed the lives of innocent air travelers and commercial airline crews in danger and must be prosecuted.”