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Archive for November 30th, 2016

FBI May Have Been Investigating Donald Trump During the Campaign

Donald TrumpBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI may have been investigating Donald Trump before the November election, according to records obtained by Vice News. 

The news agency had filed a Freedom of Information Act request for documents connected to comments made by Trump on the campaign trail.

In July, Trump urged Russia to track down “30,000 emails [from Hillary Clinton’s private email server] that are missing.” And in August, Trump made an incendiary comment that some interpreted to be the Republican calling for the assassination of opponent Hillary Clinton.

“The nature of your request implicates investigative records the FBI may or may not compile pursuant to its broad criminal and national security investigative missions and functions,” the bureau responded. “Accordingly, the FBI cannot confirm or deny the existence of any such records about your subject as the mere acknowledgment of such records existence or nonexistence would in and of itself trigger foreseeable harm to agency interests.”

Vice wrote:

This is what’s known as a Glomar response, a term that came into use after the CIA denied a reporter’s request in the 1970s for information about a CIA ship, the Glomar Explorer, designed to recover a sunken Russian submarine. The agency refused to either confirm or deny the ship’s existence.

The FBI’s response states that any records the FBI has must be withheld because disclosure would interfere with enforcement proceedings and disclose information vital for effective investigations. This response is highly suspicious.

FBI Raids Apartment of Suspected Ohio State University Attacker

Abdul Razak Ali Artan

Abdul Razak Ali Artan

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI agents raided the apartment of the Somali-born student accused of carrying out an attack Monday on Ohio State’s campus.

Dozens of agents swarmed the apartment of Abdul Razak Ali Artan at about 7 p.m., Cleveland.com reports. Agents also were investigating a Facebook declaration that may have been written by the Ohio State University student.

The attack, which included a car and a butcher knife, injured 11 people and left the suspect dead.

Cleveland.com wrote:

Agents carried briefcases, large equipment and evidence boxes into the Havenwood Townhome Community complex on Nationwide Boulevard while Franklin County deputies blocked off the street and stood guard outside the building.

It is unknown what the agents found inside. Residents said Franklin County sheriff’s deputies showed up at the home shortly after the attack. Federal agents arrived about 7 p.m. and began searching the apartment. The search was ongoing as of 9:45 p.m. 

A neighborhood business owner, Jack Ouham, said Artan visited his store daily. He described Artan as a good kid who loved going to Ohio State and who worked at a nearby Home Depot.

“He loved doing what he was doing,” said Ouham, who owns Home Town Market less than a half-mile from Artan’s apartment. “I’m shocked. He was very respectful. He was the nicest kid in the neighborhood.” 

Secret Service Investigated Ohio Man Who Wrote ‘Kill Trump’ on Facebook

1129-sub-trump-threat-facebook-7By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Secret Service agents investigated a man who appeared to threaten the life of President-elect Donald Trump.

Law enforcement officials confirmed to TMZ that the Secret Service and deputies in Greene County, Ohio, met Monday with a man who posted, “kill Trump” on Facebook.

Agents asked the man if he was serious, and he responded, “Not unless he starts going door-to-door rounding up people like he says.”

The Secret Service determined he was not a serious threat.

Donald Trump’s Candidate for Homeland Security Riles Border Hawks

U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul

U.S. Rep. Michael McCaul

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Donald Trump’s potential selection of Rep. Michael T. McCaul for secretary of Homeland Security incensed border hawks because of the congressman’s position on immigration.

McCaul, a Texas Republican and chairman of the House Homeland Security  Committee, is perceived by some as weak on border security and a supporter of amnesty, the Washington Times reports. 

McCaul has been frequently criticized by conservatives and border activists for co-authoring the 2015 Secure Our Borders First Act, which ignored the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants living in the U.S.

“We certainly hope that Donald Trump would not reward a deceptive pro-amnesty lawmaker like Michael McCaul with a Cabinet position,” said William Gheen, president of Americans for Legal Immigration PAC. “That would be very disappointing to all of us that believed his campaign promises to secure our borders and deport millions of illegal immigrants under current U.S. laws.”

The Homeland Security secretary will be a critical nomination for Trump, who has pledged to fight illegal immigration. 

DEA’s War on Synthetic Opioids Targets Cousin of Deadly Fentanyl

Synthetic opioid tablets

Synthetic opioid tablets

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA is waging a war against a deadly cousin of the synthetic opioid fentanyl to curb abuse and overdoses.

The move to ban furanyl fentanyl is part of a larger fight against synthetic opioids, which are becoming increasingly available, the Wall Street Journal reports. 

The synthetic opioids are often sold over the internet by labs in China.

Already this year, the DEA has characterized five synthetic opioids as “Schedule I,” which means they have no medical purpose and can lead to abuse.

The Journal wrote:

Furanyl fentanyl, a relative newcomer, didn’t appear in a national database that tracks drug seizures until December 2015, according to the DEA. It has quickly emerged as a serious killer among designer opioids. NMS Labs, a major private lab that works with states around the U.S., has tallied 325 deaths linked to furanyl fentanyl this year through October.

The legal form of fentanyl is a strong, up to 50 times the potency of heroin, pain reliever that often is used to help cancer patients manage serious pain. But bootleg versions of fentanyl, often made in China and then mixed into the heroin supply or included in counterfeit prescription pills have amplified the U.S. opioid crisis.

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