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Archive for August, 2015

FBI Searching for Back-Ups of Hillary Clinton’s Private E-mail Server

computer-photoBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Now that the FBI has Hillary Clinton’s private e-mail server, agents are trying to determine whether the information exists anywhere else or were backed up.

It’s part of the bureau’s investigation to determine how the former secretary of state handled classified information.

A Bloomberg reporter appeared to annoy an attorney for a company that managed Clinton’s private e-mail when asked whether the information exists elsewhere.

Bloomberg writes:

Barbara Wells, an attorney for Platte River Networks, a Denver-based company that has managed Clinton’s private e-mail since 2013, said in a phone interview Thursday that the server turned over to the Federal Bureau of Investigation “is blank and does not contain any useful data.” But Wells added that the data on Clinton’s server was migrated to another server that still exists. She ended the interview when questioned further, declining to say whether the data still exists on that other server and who has possession of it.

Neither Clinton nor her campaign returned phone calls to Bloomsberg.

“The data on the old server is not now available on any server or device that is under Platte River’s control,” Wells said during the interview.

Hamad: FBI Violates Trust with Arab Community over Surveillance Flights

By Imad Hamad
for Detroit News

The recent FBI surveillance planes that were observed flying over Dearborn a few days ago made many revisit the issue of trust between the Arab and Muslim American community and the federal government.

Did these planes fly over Dearborn because of its identity as the hub of the Arab and Muslim American community? Surveillance is an issue of concern to a community that has dealt with different unfortunate episodes, and has become aware of questionable federal law enforcement techniques.

The FBI responded to community concerns by stating that the aerial surveillance is real but its mission is legitimate law enforcement activity and not broad profiling of any particular community. Despite that, many could not help but perceive that the government was profiling the community.

There is a real and acute sense that Arab Americans and Muslim Americans are treated unfairly and viewed suspiciously as a group.

There is no doubt that the U.S. faces a real terror threat. And surveillance, when it comports with the law and the democratic traditions of the nation, is a legitimate and necessary law enforcement tool. The FBI planes are not solely an Arab or Dearborn issue, and portraying them as such is inaccurate and perhaps irresponsible as well.

Most importantly for the Arab and Muslim American community, the news of the FBI planes over parts of Metro Detroit came when the Wall Street Journal published on Aug. 5 a report about FBI efforts to counter violent extremism.

Imad Hamad is executive director of the American Human Rights Council.

To read more, click here.

J. Wallace LaPrade, Former Head of FBI’s New York Office, Dies

fbi badgeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

J. Wallace LaPrade, who once led the FBI’s New York Field Office and helped oversee the safe return over several celebrity kidnapping victims, died on July 31 at the age of 89, the New York Times reports. 

LaPrade died after a battle with heart disease.

LaPrade was a controversial figure in the bureau and was fired as head of the New York office after being accused of hiding the extent of the bureau’s investigations of radical groups in the 1970s.

Before taking the helm in New York, LaPrade was head of the FBI’s Newark regional headquarters. He served 23 years as a federal agent.

Although LaPrade was credited with being more progressive on civil liberties issues than many in the bureau, he was accused to using aggressive tactics to investigate leftist radicals.

Attacks on Fiber Networks in California Continue to Baffle Investigators

san-franciscoBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Investigators continue to struggle to determine who was responsible for more than a dozen attacks on fire optic infrastructures San Francisco’s Bay Area.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the attacker or attackers have cut cables that carry “billions to bits of Internet data.”

The attacks disrupt Internet service, financial transaction and emergency phone calls.

Authorities aren’t even clear on a motive.

“Everyone recognizes that there seems to be a pattern of events here,” said John Lightfoot,assistant deputy agent in charge at the FBI’s San Francisco office. “We really need the assistance of the public to reach out and help solve this one.”

After 10 Years in Prison, Man Seeks Revenge Against FBI Agent in Craigslist Ad

Frederick H. Banks/Twitter

Frederick H. Banks/Twitter

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Frederick H. Banks didn’t waste time seeking revenge against the FBI agent who helped land him in prison for a decade.

TribLive.com reports that the 47-year-old Pittsburgh man is accused of harassing the agent and posting a Craigslist ad pretending to be the agent seeking men to have sex with him and his wife.

He was finished with his federal probation less than a month before allegedly posting the ad June 25.

Banks, who spent 10 years behind bars for selling pirated software and using counterfeit checks, was indicted Aug. 5 by a grand jury.

Another Bizarre Twist in 25-Year-Old Art Heist Involving Aging Gangster

Theft at Gardner Museum

Theft at Steward Gardner Museum.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The bizarre case involving the 25-year-old Steward Gardner Museum heist took another strange twist after disclosures in a federal court Wednesday that an aging Connecticut gangster lied when asked in the past whether he knew anything about the stolen paintings, the Hartford Courant reports. 

As a result, the FBI terminated its cooperation agreement with the Robert Gentile.

A polygraph administered to Gentile in the past showed that he likely lied when he denied knowing nothing about the robbery of 13 gems, including three Rembrandts and works by Manet and Degas.

A polygraph administered to Gentile in the past showed that he likely lied when he denied knowing nothing about the robbery and when he said he received none of the paintings.

While the discovery explains why the FBI has doggedly pursued Gentile for years on the robbery, investigators still don’t know what happened to the paintings.

Hillary Clinton Hands Over Private Server to FBI As Part of E-Mail Investigation

Hillary_Clinton_official_Secretary_of_State_portrait_cropBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Hillary Clinton has handed over her private server as part of an investigation into her using private e-mail during her four-year stint as secretary of state.

The Washington Post reports that Clinton’s attorney also handed over a thumb drive with copies of thousands of e-mails.

Clinton’s spokesman, Nick Merrill, wouldn’t say whether the FBI demanded the devices but emphasized that she is cooperating with authorities.

“She directed her team to give her e-mail server that was used during her tenure as secretary to the Department of Justice, as well as a thumb drive containing copies of her e-mails already provided to the State Department,” Merrill said. “She pledged to cooperate with the government’s security inquiry, and if there are more questions, we will continue to address them.”

FBI Gets Tips on 25-Year-Old Art Heist in Boston After Release of Video

Theft at Gardner Museum

Theft at Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The 25-year mystery surrounding the bold heist at the Stewart Gardner Museum may be getting closer to being solved after the FBI began investigating a “handful of tips,” The New York Daily News reports.

The tips come just days after the FBI released jumpy surveillance video of the museum 24 hours before the robbery of 13 gems, including three Rembrandts and works by Manet and Degas.

One tip included the identity of a man seen leaving the museum the night before it was robbed.

The artwork is valued at $500 million.

Attorney George Burke said one of his clients identified the mystery man an antique dealer.