Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

August 2015
S M T W T F S
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Archive for August, 2015

FBI Informant Paid $40,000+ to Help in Terrorism Conspiracy Case

fbi logo largeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An informant who provided key information implicating friends in a terrorism conspiracy case was paid more than $40,000 by the FBI, the Star-Tribune reports, citing court documents. 

Defense attorneys said the payments undermine the credibility of the informant, code-named “Rover.”

“Most importantly of all, the informant has been paid in the most valuable currency of all — his freedom,” wrote attorney Andrew Birrell. “Despite lying under oath multiple times and having participated in the same conduct charged in the indictment, the informant has remained free.”

The defense attorneys want permission to interview the informant to determine whether he was induced by money to say the defendants broke the law.

The informant said the defendants planned a domestic attack.

Authorities: North Carolina Man Planned to Shoot Up FBI Because He Couldn’t Buy Gun

Walter Litteral

Walter Litteral

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

One of three men accused of building crude explosives and buying firearms to prepare for a violent confrontation with the federal government also wanted to shoot up the FBI after he was denied the ability to buy a semi-automatic rifle, the Charlotte Observer reports. 

The man was arrested, along with two others, and charged in federal court.

During brief testimony by an FBI special agent, Walter Litteral was accused of planning to drink a bottle of tequila before shooting up the FBI.

Litteral and others were afraid the U.S. government was planning to impose martial law after spotting military exercises in Gaston County in North Carolina.

Testimony was only given in Litteral’s case.

TSA Shocked After Discovering Children with Grenade, Hatchet at Florida Airports

Recovered objects/TSA

Recovered objects/TSA

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It would have been a shocking discovery no matter who was found trying to carry the potential weapons onto airplanes at two Florida airports.

But the TSA was especially surprised when they found a 12-year-old with a grenade inside a carry-on at Jacksonville International Airport earlier this week, Bay News 9 reports. 

Then on Wednesday, security found a 16-year-old with a hatchet at Orlando International Airport.

“Hatchets, knives, grenades and guns are not permitted in your carry-on bags,” said TSA spokeswoman Sari Koshetz.

Authorities later determined that the grenade was “inert and not dangerous,” Bay News 9 wrote.

Other Stories of Interest

Family of Dead Former Cop Drops Lawsuit over Alleged FBI Framing

fbi badgeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A trial in federal court ended abruptly Wednesday after a family suing an FBI agent for allegedly framing the late,  ex-cop Gary Engel in a 1984 kidnapping plot,   dropped the lawsuit.

The son of Engel dismissed the suit against retired FBI Agent Robert Buchan on what would have been the third day of the civil trial, the Chicago Tribune reports. 

The decision to drop the suit came after lawyers for the agent said that Engel’s brother was willing to sign an affidavit, saying he had implicated his sibling in the kidnapping.

The brother, Rick, said Engel came home from a trip to Missouri in 1984 and made the admission.

The family, however, reached a $3 million settlement this week with the village of Buffalo Grove, which also was a defendant in the suit. An attorney for the family said the suit was “sufficient justice.”

Engel was sentenced to 90 years for the 1984 case and served 20 years before he was released after it came to light that a key witness against him, Missouri mobster Anthony Mammolito, had been paid $500 by Buffalo Grove police.

The Tribune reported that Engel’s lawsuit against the FBI was pending in October 2012 when he was arrested as part of a plot to kidnap a suburban businessman.

A few days after that arrest, Engel was found hanged in his jail cell.

 

Senators Work on Legislation to Require FBI to Disclose ‘All’ Records to Watchdogs

Sen. Grassley

Sen. Grassley

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Inspectors general are the watchdogs of federal agencies like the FBI, but they have been stymied by a bureau that has declined to turn over critical records during investigations.

Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, said Wednesday that the FBI is obligated to follow the law as he works on legislation that would require the bureau to cooperate with IGs, The Daily Caller reports. 

The legislation, which would ensure IGs have the right to access all federal records, comes after the FBI has delayed disclosing records of wiretaps and grand juries and occasionally even filtered the records.

“I think we need a more permanent solution, one that ensures IGs have access to the records they need to do their job, and I will work closely with Sen. Grassley to craft a legislative solution,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy, the Vermont Democrat who is the committee’s ranking minority member.

Facing Growing Threat over Homegrown Terrorists, FBI Tries New Approach

fbi logo largeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

As the FBI scrambles to handle an increase in potential homegrown terrorists, the bureau is taking a new approach that would favor counseling over jail, the Wall Street Journal reports. 

The bureau is struggling to keep pace with the thousands of Americans believed to be supporting the interests of ISIS.

Especially concerning is the proliferation of teenage suspects.

“Nobody wants to see a 15-year-old kid go to jail if they don’t have to,’’ said one official working on the effort.

But, the FBI official emphasized, criminal charges would still be pursued if the suspect becomes more dangerous.

Not everyone agrees with this approach.

“I get the principle, but there are a lot of potential problems with this, and I think it’s a wrong move,’’ said Peter Ahearn a former FBI counterterrorism agent. “I’m not saying it shouldn’t be done but it shouldn’t be done by the FBI. That’s not the mission.’’

Investigators: DeKalb County Officials ‘Rotten to the Core’ with Corruption

DeKalb_County_Georgia_Incorporated_and_Unincorporated_areas_Atlanta_Highlighted Map_of_Georgia_highlighting_DeKalb_CountyBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

DeKalb County government is “rotten to the core,” investigators said, outlining allegations of bribery, theft of government property and corruption, AL.com. 

“The misconduct starts at the top and has infected nearly every department we have looked at,” wrote the investigators, former Georgia Attorney General Mike Bowers and Richard Hyde. “Expenses range from the petty to the absurd.”

Investigators called the findings “stunning” but declined to identify suspects until the report was finalized.

From cruises to the Bahamas to a Christmas tree, county officials are accused of using tax dollars to buy a variety of services and items.

New DEA Leader: ‘El Chapo’ Likely Still in Mexico After Prison Escape

'El Chapo' Guzman

‘El Chapo’ Guzman

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman is most likely still in Mexico after his escape from prison last month, the DEA’s new acting administrator said.

Chuck Rosenberg told reporters, though, that he has no hard evidence of the escapee’s whereabouts but said Guzman is likely relying on the vast resources of his Sinaloa organization in Mexico.

“I think he is still in Mexico,” Rosenberg said. “Do I know that? No, I do not know that. Where is he safest and best protected, probably Sinaloa.”

The U.S. is offering a $5 million reward for the capture of Guzman, a powerful cartel leader.

“I know the Mexicans are trying everything they can to find him,” he said. “They are working on it; we are working on it with them.”

Other Stories of Interest