Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

July 2015
S M T W T F S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Archive for July, 2015

DEA, FBI Accused of Long Relationship with Controversial Italian Firm for Surveillance

Data securityBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An Italian company with suspected ties to repressive regimes has been selling surveillance and spyware to the FBI and DEA, The Hill reports. 

The discovery comes after the firm, Hacking Team, was hacked. The hacker revealed company documents that suggest countries the company does business with countries like Sudan.

Among the discoveries was a multi-year relationship with the FBI and DEA.

“The more I read, the more I think the term ‘merchants of death’ accurately applies to @HackingTeam,” tweeted Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

The company also has been accused of selling its surveillance to help governments monitor and surprises journalists and political opponents.

FBI Director Comey Makes Case for Position on Encryption

James ComeyBy FBI Director James Comey
Lawfare

I am worried we are talking past each other with respect to “Going Dark,” so let me try to frame it in a way that I hope is fair-minded and provides a basis for healthy discussion:
These are things I believe to be true:
1. The logic of encryption will bring us, in the not-to-distant future, to a place where devices and data in motion are protected by universal strong encryption. That is, our conversations and our “papers and effects” will be locked in such a way that permits access only by participants to a conversation or the owner of the device holding the data.
2. There are many benefits to this. Universal strong encryption will protect all of us—our innovation, our private thoughts, and so many other things of value—from thieves of all kinds. We will all have lock-boxes in our lives that only we can open and in which we can store all that is valuable to us. There are lots of good things about this.
3. There are many costs to this. Public safety in the United States has relied for a couple centuries on the ability of the government, with predication, to obtain permission from a court to access the “papers and effects” and communications of Americans. The Fourth Amendment reflects a trade-off inherent in ordered liberty: To protect the public, the government sometimes needs to be able to see an individual’s stuff, but only under appropriate circumstances and with appropriate oversight.
To read more click here. 

FBI Seeks Help with Disturbing ‘Sextortion’ Case Involving Hundreds of Girls

computer-photo1By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI may be handling its biggest case yet of “sextortion.”

The bureau is asking for the public’s help finding hundreds of teenage victims who sent sexually explicit photos to a Florida man after he threatened them, WJXT reports. 

Lucas Chansler, 31, was sentenced to 105 years in federal prison last year, but hundreds of his victims have never been identified.

The bureau said he pretended to be a 15-year-old boy. After convincing a teenage girl to send a sexually explicit photo, he threatened to post the picture online unless the girl sent more photos.

This happened hundreds of time in the U.S., Canada and the UK, according to the FBI.

Eric Holder: Plea Deal Possible to Bring Back NSA Leaker Snowden

Edward Snowden

Edward Snowden

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Justice Department could make a deal to convince NSA leaker Edward Snowden to return to the U.S. after he fled in 2013 following the shocking release of secret surveillance documents.

That’s according to former U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder, who spoke to Yahoo News about the issue.

Holder said the U.S. likely would be interested in striking a deal with the whistleblower and even conceded that Snowden’s document leak “spurred a necessary debate” on surveillance.

“I certainly think there could be a basis for a resolution that everybody could ultimately be satisfied with. I think the possibility exists.”

But current AG Loretta Lynch didn’t seem as open to a deal.

“This is an ongoing case so I am not going to get into specific details but I can say our position regarding bringing Edward Snowden back to the United States to face charges has not changed,” Lynch spokeswoman Melanie Newman said in an email.

Child Pornography Investigation Leads FBI to Subway’s Jared Fogle

Jared Fogle

Jared Fogle

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Popular Subway spokesman Jared Fogle, who purportedly lost more than 200 pounds eating sandwiches from the restaurant, has been raided by the FBI this morning.

Fox50 reports that the investigation involves child pornography.

The FBI declined to divulge any details.

The director of Fogle’s charitable foundation, the Jared Foundatoin, was arrested in a child pornography case earlier this year.

Neither Subway nor Fogle could be reached for comment.

Other Stories of Interest

Updated: South Carolina Man Who Shot DEA Agent Sentenced to 8 Years

Joel Robinson

Joel Robinson

Update: Monday, 2:54 p.m. —   Orangeburg County resident Joel Robinson, who shot and wounded a DEA agent during a surprise pre-dawn drug raid outside his home last fall, was sentenced in Columbia, S.C. Monday to eight years in prison, The State newspaper reported.

The paper reports that there was a courtroom full of law enforcement officer during the sentencing.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A South Carolina man is expected to be sentenced to prison today after shooting and wounding a DEA agent during a drug raid at the suspect’s house.

The State reports that Joel Robinson will likely receive 8 years in prison as part of a plea agreement.

The 33-year-old had faced up to 30 years in prison.

Prosecutors agreed to dismiss most of the charges against Robinson if he pleaded guilty to shooting DEA Agent Barry Wilson.

No drugs were found.

Wilson said he thought the raid was a break-in.

Other Stories of Interest

Naloxone and the Surge of Fentanyl-Heroin Overdose Deaths

imgres

By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

A young woman from Michigan we will call Janice started using heroin in her early 20s. Her family stuck by her and financed several rounds of rehabilitation. Each of these was followed after a short period of time by a relapse and her family or friends rushing Janice to a hospital emergency room when she overdosed. Each time the ER docs were able to stop the overdose and stabilize her.

Then one night Janice shot up with what she thought was heroin but which had such an immediate effect that she went into respiratory arrest with the syringe still in her hand. The people she was with called 911 but could do little else. By the time she got medical help, it was too late and she died during the EMT transport.

Last week this column focused on the deadly effects that fentanyl-heroin combinations were having on opiate addicts in Canada and the United States. Since fentanyl is 30 to 50 times more potent than heroin, dealers are lacing low quality heroin with it to boost the effect without revealing this to their customers. Plus fentanyl is accessible and not expensive. Much of the fentanyl is obtained through prescription drug abuse from patients who are supposed to use the drug to combat serious pain, for example from cancer. The result has been deadly.

There is a drug that could save hundreds of lives of overdosing users. Its use in scattered projects and medical facilities around the country demonstrates that it is safe, effective and easy to administer. The problem is a lack of public education, resources and facilities with access to the life saving drug.

Naloxone Making a Difference

Naloxone blocks opioid receptor sites in the CNS, especially those in the brainstem which affect respiratory effort. It does not cure an overdose. What it does is enable the overdosing person to breathe for long enough to get her/him to medical facilities where their breathing can be secured more permanently. With the latest generation of fentanyl-heroin overdoses, this extra half hour or hour can mean the difference between life and death.

In a recent issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, writer Bridget Kuehn described a project where the Naloxone is making a significant difference. Northwest North Carolina had the third highest death rate for opiate overdoses in the country. Project Lazarus has cut the death rate essentially in half by a program of providing access to Naloxone treatment kits and training on how to administer it to laypersons who are likely to be the first to observe the overdose.

Read more »

Parker: Naloxone and the Surge of Fentanyl-Heroin Overdose Deaths

Ross Parker was chief of the criminal division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for 8 years and worked as an AUSA for 28 in that office.

Ross Parker

Ross Parker

By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

A young woman from Michigan we will call Janice started using heroin in her early 20s. Her family stuck by her and financed several rounds of rehabilitation. Each of these was followed after a short period of time by a relapse and her family or friends rushing Janice to a hospital emergency room when she overdosed. Each time the ER docs were able to stop the overdose and stabilize her.

Then one night Janice shot up with what she thought was heroin but which had such an immediate effect that she went into respiratory arrest with the syringe still in her hand. The people she was with called 911 but could do little else. By the time she got medical help, it was too late and she died during the EMT transport.

Last week this column focused on the deadly effects that fentanyl-heroin combinations were having on opiate addicts in Canada and the United States. Since fentanyl is 30 to 50 times more potent than heroin, dealers are lacing low quality heroin with it to boost the effect without revealing this to their customers. Plus fentanyl is accessible and not expensive. Much of the fentanyl is obtained through prescription drug abuse from patients who are supposed to use the drug to combat serious pain, for example from cancer. The result has been deadly.

There is a drug that could save hundreds of lives of overdosing users. Its use in scattered projects and medical facilities around the country demonstrates that it is safe, effective and easy to administer. The problem is a lack of public education, resources and facilities with access to the life saving drug.

Naloxone Making a Difference

Naloxone blocks opioid receptor sites in the CNS, especially those in the brainstem which affect respiratory effort. It does not cure an overdose. What it does is enable the overdosing person to breathe for long enough to get her/him to medical facilities where their breathing can be secured more permanently. With the latest generation of fentanyl-heroin overdoses, this extra half hour or hour can mean the difference between life and death.

In a recent issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, writer Bridget Kuehn described a project where the Naloxone is making a significant difference. Northwest North Carolina had the third highest death rate for opiate overdoses in the country. Project Lazarus has cut the death rate essentially in half by a program of providing access to Naloxone treatment kits and training on how to administer it to laypersons who are likely to be the first to observe the overdose.

Read more »