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Archive for July 6th, 2015

Updated: South Carolina Man Who Shot DEA Agent Sentenced to 8 Years

Joel Robinson

Joel Robinson

Update: Monday, 2:54 p.m. —   Orangeburg County resident Joel Robinson, who shot and wounded a DEA agent during a surprise pre-dawn drug raid outside his home last fall, was sentenced in Columbia, S.C. Monday to eight years in prison, The State newspaper reported.

The paper reports that there was a courtroom full of law enforcement officer during the sentencing.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A South Carolina man is expected to be sentenced to prison today after shooting and wounding a DEA agent during a drug raid at the suspect’s house.

The State reports that Joel Robinson will likely receive 8 years in prison as part of a plea agreement.

The 33-year-old had faced up to 30 years in prison.

Prosecutors agreed to dismiss most of the charges against Robinson if he pleaded guilty to shooting DEA Agent Barry Wilson.

No drugs were found.

Wilson said he thought the raid was a break-in.

Other Stories of Interest

Naloxone and the Surge of Fentanyl-Heroin Overdose Deaths

imgres

By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

A young woman from Michigan we will call Janice started using heroin in her early 20s. Her family stuck by her and financed several rounds of rehabilitation. Each of these was followed after a short period of time by a relapse and her family or friends rushing Janice to a hospital emergency room when she overdosed. Each time the ER docs were able to stop the overdose and stabilize her.

Then one night Janice shot up with what she thought was heroin but which had such an immediate effect that she went into respiratory arrest with the syringe still in her hand. The people she was with called 911 but could do little else. By the time she got medical help, it was too late and she died during the EMT transport.

Last week this column focused on the deadly effects that fentanyl-heroin combinations were having on opiate addicts in Canada and the United States. Since fentanyl is 30 to 50 times more potent than heroin, dealers are lacing low quality heroin with it to boost the effect without revealing this to their customers. Plus fentanyl is accessible and not expensive. Much of the fentanyl is obtained through prescription drug abuse from patients who are supposed to use the drug to combat serious pain, for example from cancer. The result has been deadly.

There is a drug that could save hundreds of lives of overdosing users. Its use in scattered projects and medical facilities around the country demonstrates that it is safe, effective and easy to administer. The problem is a lack of public education, resources and facilities with access to the life saving drug.

Naloxone Making a Difference

Naloxone blocks opioid receptor sites in the CNS, especially those in the brainstem which affect respiratory effort. It does not cure an overdose. What it does is enable the overdosing person to breathe for long enough to get her/him to medical facilities where their breathing can be secured more permanently. With the latest generation of fentanyl-heroin overdoses, this extra half hour or hour can mean the difference between life and death.

In a recent issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, writer Bridget Kuehn described a project where the Naloxone is making a significant difference. Northwest North Carolina had the third highest death rate for opiate overdoses in the country. Project Lazarus has cut the death rate essentially in half by a program of providing access to Naloxone treatment kits and training on how to administer it to laypersons who are likely to be the first to observe the overdose.

Read more »

Parker: Naloxone and the Surge of Fentanyl-Heroin Overdose Deaths

Ross Parker was chief of the criminal division in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Detroit for 8 years and worked as an AUSA for 28 in that office.

Ross Parker

Ross Parker

By Ross Parker
ticklethewire.com

A young woman from Michigan we will call Janice started using heroin in her early 20s. Her family stuck by her and financed several rounds of rehabilitation. Each of these was followed after a short period of time by a relapse and her family or friends rushing Janice to a hospital emergency room when she overdosed. Each time the ER docs were able to stop the overdose and stabilize her.

Then one night Janice shot up with what she thought was heroin but which had such an immediate effect that she went into respiratory arrest with the syringe still in her hand. The people she was with called 911 but could do little else. By the time she got medical help, it was too late and she died during the EMT transport.

Last week this column focused on the deadly effects that fentanyl-heroin combinations were having on opiate addicts in Canada and the United States. Since fentanyl is 30 to 50 times more potent than heroin, dealers are lacing low quality heroin with it to boost the effect without revealing this to their customers. Plus fentanyl is accessible and not expensive. Much of the fentanyl is obtained through prescription drug abuse from patients who are supposed to use the drug to combat serious pain, for example from cancer. The result has been deadly.

There is a drug that could save hundreds of lives of overdosing users. Its use in scattered projects and medical facilities around the country demonstrates that it is safe, effective and easy to administer. The problem is a lack of public education, resources and facilities with access to the life saving drug.

Naloxone Making a Difference

Naloxone blocks opioid receptor sites in the CNS, especially those in the brainstem which affect respiratory effort. It does not cure an overdose. What it does is enable the overdosing person to breathe for long enough to get her/him to medical facilities where their breathing can be secured more permanently. With the latest generation of fentanyl-heroin overdoses, this extra half hour or hour can mean the difference between life and death.

In a recent issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, writer Bridget Kuehn described a project where the Naloxone is making a significant difference. Northwest North Carolina had the third highest death rate for opiate overdoses in the country. Project Lazarus has cut the death rate essentially in half by a program of providing access to Naloxone treatment kits and training on how to administer it to laypersons who are likely to be the first to observe the overdose.

Read more »

SLT Editorial: DEA Should Not Bypass Judges Or Search Warrants

dea-badgeBy Editorial Board
The Salt Lake Tribune

If the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says it can’t do its job without bypassing a judge’s signature, it raises reasonable suspicions about law enforcement operating without proper oversight.

If the DEA adds that such a bypass is needed to stop Utahns from overdosing at high rates, it exposes just how shameless the war on drugs has become.

In a move that raises the specter of indiscriminate NSA phone monitoring, the federal government’s drug cops are pushing back against a Utah law that took effect this year that requires a judge to sign a search warrant for access to the state’s data base of prescriptions. Before that law, law enforcement could simply use “administrative subpoenas” that required no signoff from a judge.

It is precisely because of the abuse of such subpoenas that Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, sponsored the Utah law. The prescription data base was created in 1995 to track the blossoming problem of prescription drug abuse, particularly pain medications, and police could access it without a formal warrant from a judge.

In a notorious case, Cottonwood Heights police searched through every prescription issued to 480 Unified Fire Authority employees after pills were found missing from ambulances. If that egregious violation of privacy wasn’t enough, prosecutors eventually filed faulty charges against one assistant fire chief based on the search. He was cleared, and he’s now suing Cottonwood Heights.

DEA’s spokeswoman says the state’s new requirement “will significantly hamper our mission,” but she didn’t elaborate on how. All the Utah law asks is that the DEA get a judge to sign a warrant before the data base can be searched. That is something that could take as little as a couple of hours in a process that most of law enforcement uses daily. It also adds a measure of legitimacy to any investigation, meaning that the eventual charges have a better chance of sticking.

To read more click here. 

Mexican Immigrants Getting Injured at Alarming Rates by Jumping Border Fence

border fence photoBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The treacherous trek through the 100-degree desert may not be the most difficult challenge for many immigrants who are sneaking over the border from Mexico.

The Arizona Daily Star reports that an increasing number of people are getting injured trying to jump the border fence, which has been made higher in some areas.

As a result, hospitals are seeing numerous case of injured immigrants. Most of the injuries are to the feet, ankles and spine.

“It’s the same crossing through the wall or through the desert,” said Gilda Felix, director of the Juan Bosco immigrant shelter from Nogales. “Both are difficult and dangerous.”

The exact number of people getting injured from jumping the fence is unclear, but nearly 100 case were reported so far this year by two Mexican consulates.

How FBI Tracked Down Pedophile Using Facial Recognition Technology

FBI-facial-recognitionBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Lynn Cozart eluded authorities for 19 years after he was convicted of sexually assaulting three children.

In a last-ditch effort, the FBI submitted his mug shot to the bureau’s new facial recognition technology, Next Generation Identification (NGI).

Before long, the mug shot matched a driver’s license photo from Oklahoma, Valley News Live reports. 

The match helped the FBI track Cozard down at a Walmart in Oklahoma, where he was working under a different name.

“You take a case that had a 19 year gap, or the guy was on the run for 19 years,” said Stephen L. Morris, the assistant director of the FBI’s Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division, which includes NGI.

“Technology did result in the identification of that guy because it happened to provide them a lead they were able to run down in Oklahoma,” he told CBS News. “When the task force in Oklahoma started running it down, they were able to verify the individual under a different name was one in the same as the individual working in Walmart.”

The system went live in September and reportedly cost $1 billion.