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Archive for July, 2015

Head of FBI’s Boston Office to Retire And Join Private Sector After 2 Years at Helm

Vincent Lisi

Vincent Lisi

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The head of the FBI in Boston is retiring after 26 years of service with the agency.

Vincent B. Lisi, who was appointed to run the Boston field office two years ago, plans to join the private sector as a director of security, his spokeswoman told the Boston Globe. 

“Vince has worked tirelessly during his tenure . . . and the district has clearly benefited from his expertise and dogged work ethic,” U.S. Attorney Carmen M. Ortiz said. “He truly exemplifies public service as evidenced by his long and impressive career.”

Boston Police Commissioner William Evans lauded Lissi for his “help, support and professionalism” in keeping the region safe.

“During his time in Boston, the already strong relationship between the FBI and the BPD only got stronger, and [Lisi] will be missed,” Evans said.

Lisi, who took over the position three months after the Boston Marathon attack, oversaw FBI operations in Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island.

Details of his job weren’t immediately clear.

DOJ Report: FBI Struggles to Hire Enough Cyber Security Experts Because of Low Pay

computer-photoBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI has struggled to hire enough computer scientists to crackdown on cyber security threats because of low pay, according to a Justice Department report.

Reuters reports that the FBI has hired just 52 of 134 computer scientists authorized under the Justice Department’s Next Generation Cyber Initiative that began in 2012.

The rise of cyberattacks has prompted the Justice Department to prioritize the hiring of computer experts.

The FBI’s has a $134 million budget for the program, which includes 1,333 full-time employees.

Compared to the private sector, the FBI doesn’t pay enough to attack cyber experts. Other contributing factors were drug tests and extensive background checks.

FBI Director James Comey Announces 3 Key Leadership Appointments

Kevin Perkins/FBI photo

Kevin Perkins/FBI photo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

FBI Director James B. Comey has made three key leadership appointments, including a new special agent in charge of the FBI Baltimore Division.

Comey made the announcement Thursday.

Kevin Perkins, who served three year as associated deputy director, will take the helm in Baltimore to replace retiring Stephen Vogt.

Mr. Perkins entered on duty as a special agent in January 1986. He previously served in the Kansas City, Philadelphia, and Baltimore Divisions in a variety of investigative and leadership positions. Mr. Perkins previously served as the special agent in charge in Baltimore from January 2004 to February 2006.

Mr. Perkins’ executive leadership positions included serving as assistant director for the Criminal Investigative Division, the Inspection Division, and the Finance Division, where he also served as chief financial officer of the FBI.

Andrew McCabe

Andrew McCabe

Comey also announced that Andrew McCabe, who served as assistant director in charge of the Washington Field Office, was named as associate deputy director at FBI headquarters.

McCabe has a host of experience, but primarily has focused on counterterrorism and counterintelligence over the past decade.

McCabe was a lawyer in the private practice before joining the FBI.

Paul Abbate

Paul Abbate

Comey also announced the appointment of Paul M. Abbate as assistant director in charge of the Washington Field Office.

Abbate has served as special agent in charge of the Detroit Division since October 2013. He also served much of his time focusing on counterterrorism and was deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan.

San Diego Union-Tribune: Advocates of Marijuana Legalization Miss Mark

marijuana-istockBy David W. Murray & John P. Walters
The San Diego Union-Tribune

A recent example of the logical abandon of today’s backers of legal marijuana is the plan to defund the Drug Enforcement Administration’s program to eradicate illegal marijuana (DEA/CESP), an $18 million program that eliminates millions of plants a year and arrests thousands of criminals, many of whom were brought here to labor for Mexican drug cartels controlling the marijuana black market.

Yet Congressman Ted Lieu (D-CA) wants to end the effort as a “ridiculous waste” of federal resources, when multiple states “have already legalized marijuana,” use of which should “no longer be a federal crime.” Clearly, the congressman has not thought this through. He is, in fact, arguing against his own legal marijuana case.

A central tenet of the legalization movement is that criminal marijuana was to be supplanted by “safe, regulated and taxed” marijuana under careful control. It is a contradiction of that principle to foster, by cutting the DEA program, the proliferation of unregulated, untaxed and “unsafe” marijuana plants controlled by violent criminals, thereby corrupting the entire point of a “legalized” marijuana market.

While a “regulated and taxed market” was the position sold to legislators, the real objective seems to be a dope-growing paradise, unregulated and unopposed. Congressman Lieu doesn’t even try to explain how this is supposed to advance America’s well-being.

For years now, Americans have been subjected to efforts by advocates for legalized marijuana to make their case. Today, the arguments often come from legalization lobbyists, often with legal or political training, seeking to legitimize what they hope will become a billion-dollar business in addictive toxins – repeat customers guaranteed.

Or consider the argument that marijuana is “safer to use” than alcohol. That alcohol is dangerous all acknowledge, costing the health of thousands. But the proper argument is that each intoxicant presents its own unique threats. It is not productive medically to “rank” them. But what is the logical implication of the alcohol talking point?

The regulation of alcohol is precisely the idealized model that lobbyists put forth for legal drugs. Hence, every time they insist that alcohol is the more damaging substance, what they are actually showing is that the model of legal, regulated sales of addictive substances produces widespread harm to adults and adolescents.

To read more click here. 

 

DEA Gets New Leader of Philadelphia Field Division; Pledges Fight Against Heroin

Gary Tuggle

Gary Tuggle

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A 23-year veteran of the DEA has been named as the next head of the Philadelphia Field Division.

Philly.com reports that Gary Tuggle will oversee the city and five regional officers in Pennsylvania and Delaware, replacing Don Dongilli, who retired last year.

Tuggle’s career began as a Baltimore City police officer before joining the DEA in 1992.

Most recently, Tuggle served as the assistant special agent in charge of the DEA’s Washington Office.

Tuggle said he plans to focus on the heroin and prescription drug epidemic.

Other Stories of Interest

Sister of Kidnapping, Murder Suspect Files Claim Against FBI for Killing Brother

fbi logo largeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The sister of a man killed in the Idaho wilderness after authorities said he abducted a 16-year-old girl and killer her relatives is suing the FBI for $20 million, saying her brother never got a fair trial, the Associated Press reports. 

The attorney of Lori DiMaggio Robinson filed a claim with the FBI Thursday and plans to soon file suit.

“We need a lot more information,” attorney C. Keith Gree said. “We need to know why the officers felt like they were being targeted and to find out if they truly were in harm’s way.”

James DiMaggio, 40, was killed in August 2013 after triggering a massive manhunt.

He was shot six times after the FBI said he fired rifle shots as a rescue attempt was underway.

“The FBI agents’ unprivileged use of force therefore constitutes an assault and battery against DiMaggio, leading to DiMaggio’s wrongful death under Idaho law,” attorneys stated in the claim. “None of the agents present sought to intervene to prevent the excessive force, though able.”

Jimmy Hoffa: On the 40th Anniversary of His Disappearance, the Case Goes Unsolved

Featured_hoffajameshoffascreen_shot_2013-02-18_at_12.02.00_am

Jimmy Hoffa

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

DETROIT — I remember back in 1983 interviewing Jimmy P. Hoffa about his father’s disappearance and asking if it bothered him that comedians like Johnny Carson used his father as a punch line in jokes.

Eight years had passed since his disappearance, but time didn’t seem to soften the blow. Hoffa, who was 42 at the time and a labor attorney,  said in no uncertain terms that it did bother him and he didn’t appreciate it one bit. He also wanted to know what really happened. To this day, no one has ever been charged.

Today marks the 40 year anniversary of the disappearance of James Riddle Hoffa, who would now be 102.

Hoffa, who is now the president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, declined to comment on Thursday on the anniversary.

Instead, the union issued a press release that said:

Hoffa was devoted to his union and to his family. He gave his life while fighting to remove corrupt elements from the union and return power to the members.

On this tragic anniversary, Teamster members and retirees from across North America join together in honoring the man who forever improved the lives of millions of workers and their families.

On July 30, 1975, he was supposed to meet two gangsters — Anthony “Tony Pro” Provenzano  of New Jersey and Anthony “Tony Jack” Giacalone of the Detroit area — at the Machus Red Fox on Telegraph Road in Bloomfield Township. They didn’t show and he reportedly got into someone’s car in the parking lot and was never seen again.

Theories abound. Over the years, properties have been dug up on the hunch that the body was buried there.

Some gangsters who likely knew what happened are dead including Giacalone and Provenzano. And the Machus Red Fox is gone as well.

WDIV’s Kevin Dietz reports on the anniversary. He  goes over some of the theories, reports on the embarrassing FBI digs and talks to Scott Burnstein, a Detroit area reporter who specializes in organized crime.

video platformvideo managementvideo solutionsvideo player

Western New York Man Accused of Recruiting People to ISIS on Twitter

Arafat M. NagiBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A western New York man was arrested after federal authorities said he began recruiting people to join ISIS.

Arafat M. Nagi, 44, of Lackawanna, was charged Wednesday with trying to supply material support and resources to a foreign terrorist organization, the New York Post reports. 

“This is yet another occasion when the worldwide fight against international terrorism has returned to western New York,” U.S. Attorney William Hochul Jr. said.

According to prosecutors, Nagi traveled to Syria and Yemen to join ISIS in 2012 and 2014 and even bought military gear on eBay.

The FBI said Nagi tried to recruit people on Twitter, where his account was flooded with Arabic tweets supporting ISIS.