Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

March 2015
S M T W T F S
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Archive for March, 2015

Border Patrol Agent Fatally Shot ‘Illegal Border Crosser;’ Investigation Under way

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An investigation is underway after a Border Patrol agent fatally shot a suspected “illegal border crosser” Thursday while on patrol near the U.S.-Canada border in Washington State,  CNN reports.

CBP said the agent, whose identity has not been released, fired his weapon after he was assaulted by the suspect.

“The agent had been hit by pepper spray but wasn’t seriously injured, according to police radio traffic,” The Bellingham Herald wrote.

The shooting occurred between Sumas, Washington, and Abbotsford, British Columbia near the Huntington Border Crossing.

Secret Service Director Disputes News Accounts of White House Crash

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Secret Service Director Joe Clancy disputed news reports that two high-ranking agents drunkenly crashed into a gate at the White House.

“Previous reports of a crash are inaccurate — there was no crash,” Clancy said at a Senate Appropriations Homeland Security subcommittee hearing, CNN reports. 

“The video shows the vehicle entering the White House complex at a speed of approximately one to two miles per hour, and pushing aside a plastic barrel. There was no damage to the vehicle,” he said.

Still, Clancy said it was “unacceptable” that it took five days for him to be notified of the incident.

“If it is determined that any one of our employees concealed information about this alleged incident, they will be held accountable,” he told the panel. “Our mission is too important for this to happen. It undermines my leadership and I won’t stand for it.”

Other Stories of Interest

Video Shows Border Patrol Agent’s Questionable Handling of Motorist

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A video has surfaced showing a Border Patrol agent potentially mishandling a driver who refused to say where he was going and declined a search.

“What is your reasonable suspicion?” asked Rick Herbert, who was in the car with his 4-year-old son.

The agent grabbed Herbet by the arm.

“Hey, dude, stop, I got to unbuckle my seatbelt first,” Herbert told him. “You’re being recorded, just so you know.”

Herbert was shoved against the window of the back seat, handcuffing him in front of his child.

Do you think the agent crossed the line?

FBI Special Agent Fired Amid Allegations of Stealing Cash While on Drug Task Force

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A special agent for the FBI has been fired and is under investigation for allegedly stealing thousands of dollars while working on a drug task force in Riverside, Calif., ABC7 reports. 

Scott Bowman, who joined the bureau in 2005, was escorted out of FBI headquarters in early February and fired. He had transferred to D.C. after being on the task force.

He is now the subject of a criminal investigation. Bowman most recently was a supervisory special agent at Washington D.C. headquarters after working out of the Los Angeles field office.

Now questions have been raised about Bowman’s handling of criminal cases, and about 75 current and former defendants in drug cases have received a letter from the government about Bowman’s termination.

The Justice Department’s Public Integrity Section and the Office of the Inspector General is investigating.

“The alleged misconduct was brought to our attention late last year,” said David Bowdich, Assistant Director In Charge of the Los Angeles Field Office. “As soon as we learned of that, we gathered some initial facts and we immediately turned this over to the Inspector General’s Office under D.O.J.”

The letter adds: approximately $15,582 in funds under Bowman’s control and possession that were seized during state search warrants executed on June 14, 2014 and June 25, 2014 in United States V. Miller, ED CR 14-89-JGB, are missing and Bowman has not provided any plausible explanation for the missing funds.”

Details of FBI’s Closely Guarded ‘Stingray’ May Soon Become Public

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI directed a local police department to drop criminal charges against a suspect in 2012 to avoid the public finding out about a secret device to track people, CNN reports.

The device, called the “Stringray,” allows investigators to find suspects by tracking their cell phones. The technology mimics a cell phone tower, tricking the phone into switching over to the “Stringray” while investigators access the location.

Judge Patrick H. NeMoyer in Buffalo, NY, has indicated he wants the FBI to turn over details of the secret technology that the bureau was using with Erie Police in Pennsylvania.

According to CNN, police used the device to track several criminal suspects, four missing people and a suicidal person.

But the judge believes the public has a right to know more details of the technology.

Wisconsin May Hire 5 Justice Department staffers to Investigate Cop-Involved Shootings

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The national outcry over cop-involved shootings may mean more accountability in Wisconsin.

Gov. Scott Walker said he may change his mind and include in the budget enough money to hire five state Justice Department staffers to investigate the officer-involved deaths, the Milwaukee-Wisconsin Journal Sentinel reports.

“If DOJ feels as though additional funding is necessary to address these cases, we are willing to work with them and the state Legislature to ensure adequate funding,” Walker spokeswoman Laurel Patrick said in an email.

One of the most recent officer-involved shootings occurred March 6 in Madison, where Tony Robinson was fatally shot by a white cop, prompting large protests.

Other Stories of Interest


Border Patrol Agent Accuses Homeland Security of Manipulating Statistics

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Border Patrol agent told a Senate committee Tuesday that Homeland Security is fudging border statistics to make the border seem safer than it actually is, The Business Insider reports.

“I want to be crystal clear – the border is not secure,” said border agent Chris Cabrera in prepared testimony before the Senate Homeland Security Committee on Tuesday.

“That is not just my opinion or the position of the NBPC,” he said, speaking on behalf of the National Border Patrol Council. “Ask any line agent in the field and he or she will tell you that at best we apprehend 35 to 40 percent of the illegal immigrants attempting to cross. This number is even lower for drug smugglers who are much more adept at eluding capture.”

Cabrera said the number of footprints from immigrants, for example, are severely undercounted and that supervisors create incentives for agents to lie.

“Agents who repeatedly report groups larger than 20 face retribution,” he said. “Management will either take them out of the field and assign them to processing detainees at the station or assign them to a fixed position in low volume areas as punishment.”

“Needless to say agents got the message and now stay below this 20 person threshold no matter the actual size of the group,” he added.

FBI Investigating Massive Cyberattack on Premera Health Insurance Company

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is investigating a large cyberattack on the Premera health insurance company after concerns that personal and financial information of nearly 11 million customers has been compromised, ABC News reports.

Premera said there’s no evidence yet that data was used “inappropriately.”

The company discovered the “sophisticated attack” nearly seven weeks ago and quickly learned that the hacking began in May 2014. The FBI was immediately notified, the company and bureau said.

“Cybercrime remains a significant threat and the FBI will continue to devote substantial resources and efforts to bringing cyber criminals to justice,” FBI spokesman Joshua Campbell said in a statement.

Premera is beginning to warning customers of the breach.

“[T]he attackers may have gained unauthorized access to members’ information, which could include members’ name, date of birth, Social Security number, mailing address, email address, telephone number, member identification number, bank account information, and claims information, including clinical information,” Premera said in its statement. “Individuals who do business with Premera and provided the company with their email address, personal bank account number, or Social Security number are also affected.”