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Archive for November, 2011

Four Arrested in AT&T Hacking; Group Allegedly Paid by Saudi Terrorist Group

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

The FBI, with the help of local law enforcement, arrested four people in the Philippines last week allegedly hacking into AT&T’s computer system.

CNET News reports that the four were allegedly paid by the same Saudi Arabian terrorist group that funded the 2008 Mumbai attacks.

While AT&T said their systems were not breached, the hacking cost the company $2 million in losses. Money stolen from the hacks was sent to the bank accounts of the terrorists, who payed the Filipinos on commission.

To read more click here.

 

Another Job for Ex-FBI Director Louie Freeh

Louis Freeh

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

Louis Freeh is a busy man these days.

After being tapped to look into the unfolding scandal at Penn State, the former FBI director is now taking part in MF Global’s Chapter 11 bankruptcy case, reports the Associated Press.  He has been appointed trustee for the company. Media reports  say up to $1.2 billion in customer accounts is missing from the firm.

Freeh headed the bureau from 1993 through 2001 and is now chairman of Freeh Group International Solutions LLC, a global risk-management firm. MF Global filed for bankruptcy protection after placing bad bets on European debt and is currently being investigated by the FBI over actions that may have violated securities and criminal law. The financial firm asked Freeh to act as its trustee in seeking bankruptcy protection.

To read more click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST:

 

Weekend Series on Crime History: The Real Serpico

Trailer to the Movie

Woman Tells United Airlines Boyfriend is Terrorist; FBI Arrests Her

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Here’s a good reminder for jilted lovers who feel the great need for revenge: DON’T ever Do this.

The New York Daily News reports that a woman called the United Airlines shortly before her ex-boyfriend boarded an international flight on Sept. 25 from Las Vegas to Paris and suggested he was a terrorist.

The FBI arrested Lizet Sariol , 45, the Daily News reported. She was behind bars on Wednesday.

To read the full story click here.

 

Newark Jury Deadlocks in Murder Case Against Ex-Fed Prosecutor Paul Bergrin

Paul Bergrin/photo News12 New Jersey

Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The day before Thanksgiving, Paul Bergrin,  the ex-fed prosecutor who became a high-profile defense attorney representing rappers and gangbangers, had plenty to be thankful for.

That’s because a federal judge on Wednesday declared a mistrial after a jury deadlocked over whether Bergrin, 55, helped orchestrate a 2004 murder of an FBI witness in a drug case against his client, the Newark Star-Ledger reported.

The paper reported that the trial was ” based on testimony that lacked hard evidence.”

“The hung jury brings an end to a tense and often-theatrical trial that had featured steely accusations among the lawyers; screaming in the courtroom; angry, nervous witnesses; admonishments by the judge; and — on more than one occasion — the judge himself questioning whether the government had presented enough evidence to convict Bergrin,” the paper wrote.

The paper quoted U.S. Attorney Paul J. Fishman as saying in a statement: “While it is disappointing the jury was unable to reach a verdict, we are fully prepared for the next trial.”

To read more click here.

 

Column: FBI and CIA Deserve As Much Thanks as the Military

Kessler is the author of “The Secrets of the FBI.”

fbi photo

By Ronald Kessler
Newsmax

Because of the terrorist threat, the FBI and CIA have become as important as the military in preserving our freedom. Yet while thanking our military is standard practice in American life, no one thinks of thanking the FBI, the CIA, or the rest of the intelligence community for keeping us safe since 9/11.

Instead, the media and many on the extreme left and extreme right demonize the men and women of those agencies for allegedly “spying on innocent Americans.”

Last year, two Washington Post reporters took two years to uncover this story: The intelligence community is big and secret and uses a lot of contractors. Presented as an exposé, the series, “Top Secret America,” found no abuse. Instead, it presented the conclusion that the intelligence community is a “hidden world” that is “growing beyond control.”

To read more click here.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Happy Thanksgiving from ticklethewire.com

“Some people are always grumbling because roses have thorns; I am thankful
that thorns have roses.”Alphonse Karr

*******
“You cannot do a kindness too soon because you never know how soon it will be too late.” Ralph Waldo Emerson

Column: Ex-FBI Official Mike Mason Challenges Comment by FBI Profiler on Penn State Scandal

Michael Mason, a former assistant director in charge of the FBI’s Washington field office, retired as the executive assistant director at FBI headquarters in 2007. His column is in response to a column ex-fed prosecutor Ross Parker wrote in the form of a  letter to his son about the Penn State Scandal in which he quoted Jane Turner, an FBI psychological profiler, who said: “It takes enormous strength to put one’s moral integrity over your personal inclination to protect fellow colleagues who have committed malfeasance, or criminal activity. The FBI, like Penn State and the Catholic Church, are entities that allows their personnel to report allegations up a chain of command but those in positions of power or change, fail to take immediate or strong actions.”

Mike Mason/fbi photo

 
 
By Michael Mason
for ticklethewire.com

I have tried for the past two days to get beyond Ross Parker’s letter to his son and specifically the reference he made to the FBI via a piece apparently written by FBI profiler Jane Turner.

I too, have sons and have always taught them to stand tall when faced with moral imperatives.

I have shared with them many times that never in my FBI career was I ashamed to look at myself in the mirror for my conduct or that of my colleagues regarding the decisions we were called upon to make on a daily basis. I have shared with them times when agents have gone astray and been held accountable for doing so. I have shared with them the times I had to take a stand against conventional wisdom and against my own best interest and proudly did so.

I am not alone in any of the above. I did not inhabit an insular world. As you know I left the FBI as an Executive Assistant Director and there is not a single day of my entire career for which I am ashamed of or would be afraid to put on the front page of the Washington Post or New York Times.

I am proud of the many internal discussions we had in the FBI about choosing the right course of action in a myriad of situations most would find extremely challenging. Did we always choose the right course of action, perhaps not, but I can tell you and the readers of Ticklethewire that we left those meetings believing we had done so.

I never left any such meeting with my head hung low, ashamed that I, or one of my colleagues, had not spoken up when the occasion required us to do so.

I believed I wrestled with enough truly challenging decisions over the course of my career that teaching a masters level philosophy course would have been a natural role for me and many others to fill in retirement. So when I read comments about the FBI, even from FBI employees such as Jane Turner, I find myself wondering to what, specifically, they are referring.

Now that I am in the private sector, I can assure you the significant decisions made by the FBI are more exposed to the light of public opinion than virtually any such decisions made in this arena.

My point here is not to suggest the FBI was or will ever be flawless in their decision making processes or in the execution of their sworn duties. However, throughout my career I worked with some of the hardest working, most honest people I have ever met. I have seen FBI employees give more of themselves than the average American will ever be asked to give.

Every day of their respective careers they tried desperately to do the right thing. So try as I might to simply read Parker’s article and move on, I have been unable to do so. What was essentially a “drive-by” comment linking the unfortunate incident at Penn State to the general environment at the FBI demands a response. Parker’s use of Turner’s piece in his letter to his son suggest at a minimum he agrees with her statement. I categorically do not.

I have no doubt that both Jane Turner and Ross Parker are very fine individuals who served the public well. I have no doubt Parker’s son, if he follows his dad’s advice, will become a fine young man as well.

However, I believe the exact same thing about my two sons and dozens of other sons and daughters of FBI employees who have dispense similar advice to their children.

Far from an “insular world” the one I inhabited while serving in the FBI dealt with extraordinarily complex situations which often called for very difficult decisions. Never did I find my colleagues shrinking from their responsibility to try and make the right call.