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Archive for May, 2011

Death of bin Laden Creates Opening on FBI Ten Most Wanted List


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The death of Osama bin Laden will open a spot in on the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted Fugitive List.

Bin Laden had been a fixture on the list for years.

As what typically happens now, the FBI  will solicit from its field offices a candidate to replace bin Laden.

Often, dozens of recommendations come in to headquarters. Field offices submit packets with information about the case, including a case file, photos and reasons why the person is worthy of joining the list. Some submissions include endorsements from local police chiefs.

The Violent Crimes/Major Offenders Unit also solicits input from the media representatives at headquarters.

The candidates for the list are reviewed by a committee of agents from the Violent Crimes/Major Offenders unit, who carefully look over the submissions and case files.

Then higher ups at headquarters decide who makes the list. The FBI director ultimately signs off on it.

The information on the Top 10 list said bin Laden was “wanted for “Murder of U.S. Nationals Outside the United States; Conspiracy to Murder U.S. Nationals Outside the United States; Attack on a Federal Facility Resulting in Death.”

“Usama Bin Laden is wanted in connection with the August 7, 1998, bombings of the United States Embassies in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and Nairobi, Kenya. These attacks killed over 200 people. In addition, Bin Laden is a suspect in other terrorist attacks throughout the world”

“Bin Laden is the leader of a terrorist organization known as Al-Qaeda, “The Base”. He is left-handed and walks with a cane.”

Dallas U.S. Atty. Says Holder and Pres. Had No Hand in Decision Not to Prosecute Muslim Leader

U.S. Atty. James Jacks

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The U.S. Attorney in Dallas has stepped into the controversy over the decision not to prosecute a former founder of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR).

Rep. Peter King (R-N.Y.) claimed Atty. Gen. Eric Holder shut down the probe into former CAIR leader Omar Ahmad for fear of offending Muslim groups.

But the  Dallas Morning News reported that Dallas U.S. Attorney James Jacks, who was involved in the investigation,  said that Holder and President Obama had no hand in the decision not to prosecute, and politics played no part.

“Since late 2007, I am the only attorney in this office that was involved in the investigation he referred to,” Jacks said in a statement to the newspaper. “If someone is telling [King] that the attorney general or the White House intervened to decline a prosecution in this matter, he is being misinformed. That did not happen.”

“The decision to indict or not indict a case is based upon an analysis of the evidence and the law,” Jacks said. “That’s what happened in this case.”

Rep. King told Politico: “I stand by my position entirely.”

Holder recently said Bush Justice Department also passed on the opportunity to prosecute the same person.

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Osama bin Laden is Dead!

Osama bin Laden

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Nearly 10 years after the 9/11 attacks, Americans seemed to have given up hope on ever capturing or killing the ever-elusive Osama bin Laden, the man who had become the devil incarnate to many in the world.

But Sunday night that all  changed.

President Obama late Sunday night announced that bin Laden had been killed in Pakistan by U.S. forces in a firefight. He said U.S. forces then took custody of his body.

He had become a figure of evil, but also a punchline for talk shows.

After the U.S. attacked Afghanistan after 9/11, it was long believed that bin Laden was hiding out in the tribal areas of Pakistan.

President George W. Bush got some grief for not killing or capturing him during his two-terms.  And many assumed the trail by now had gone cold and the master of elusiveness would die of natural causes.

Of course, authorities don’t expect for al Qaeda to vanish. However, the death is, if anything, a symbolic victory for the U.S. Others believe it could have an impact on al Qaeda operations.