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How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Archive for February 7th, 2009

A Job Recruiter Is Not Your Best Friend: Dos and Don’ts

Recently while interviewing a candidate for a senior-level communications position at a Fortune 500 company, I was reminded of the golden rule when interviewing with recruiters. DO NOT bare your soul to a recruiter and expect he/she to be your best friend. When I asked the candidate how his subordinates would describe him, he replied, “I think they would probably say I’m a dick.” He was trying to be funny and if we were friends sharing war stories over a beer, it might have been. But that off-the-cuff remark cost him the job.

Don’t make the same mistake. Think of your interview with a recruiter as a dress rehearsal for the big show. It is your chance to perfect your 30 second elevator speech and convince us that you are the best candidate for the job.

Our role is to assess your qualifications and cultural fit as a candidate for searches we are conducting on behalf of our clients. We work for our clients, not the candidates. Everything you say and do impacts our decision to move you forward or not in the process.

Here are some “Do’s and Don’ts of Headhunter Etiquette” developed by The Repovich-Reynolds Group to ensure you do not commit any gaffes with the executive search community:

DO

DON’T

Treat the recruiter like you would the client.

Bare your soul and expect the recruiter to be your best friend

Be punctual and courteous

Manipulate your background and experience to fit the opportunity

Give the recruiter your accurate compensation information

Be arrogant or pretentious. There is a fine line between self confidence and arrogance.

Have an appropriate sense of humor.

Expect the interview to translate into a job offer. The search process is highly competitive.

Your homework

Ramble on when interviewing

Stay in touch with a recruiter by email or phone.

Demean or badmouth your prior employers

Dress professionally

Give yourself all the credit. You are part of a team, acknowledge others.

Present yourself in an honest, forthright manner. Speak with confidence.

Assume business casual is appropriate for an interview. I’ve seen good candidates eliminated because of how they dressed.

Be specific about your contributions to an organization.

Forget your table manners

Present a clear and concise resume that emphasizes your accomplishments

Bombard recruiters with materials on your accomplishments unless they ask for it.

Turn your cell phone off during interviews

Circumvent the recruiter and call the potential employer yourself.

Send a thank you note following an interview. Email is acceptable.

Take rejection personally. Use it as a learning moment to make your next best career move.


Sleeping With the Fishes? Dead Fish Shows Up At D.C. Homeland Security Office

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com
WASHINGTON — It was like a scene out of the Godfather.
A letter containing a dead fish showed up Friday at a downtown office of the Department of Homeland Security.
The letter, which also contained white powder, was addressed to an employee.
The Associated Press reported that FBI Washington Field Office spokeswoman Katherine Schweit said the letter was been sent to a lab for examination and people were screened who came in contact with it.

New Mexico U.S. Attorney Would Like to Stay

Interestingly, this office was at the center of the U.S. Attorney firing controversy. And now the office is involved in a pay-to-play investigation into state government and Gov. Bill Richardson. Will any of this make a difference in the Obama Justice Department’s decision whether to keep the U.S. Attorney?

By TIM KORTE
Associated Press
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.– Greg Fouratt hopes to stay in place. But with a new administration in Washington, the U.S. attorney in New Mexico is realistic and knows he could be changing jobs soon.
It’s likely President Barack Obama will appoint someone else to serve as the chief federal law enforcement official in New Mexico. In that scenario, Fouratt would go back to carrying a briefcase to represent the government in court.
“There’s a lot to like about this job,” Fouratt said in an interview with The Associated Press. “If I could be helpful staying in this position, then I would be privileged to stay. If it is the plan that I return to life as a line prosecutor, then I’ll help from that position.”
Yet there are a few complexities surrounding the situation.
First, Fouratt took over last year but wasn’t appointed by former Republican President George W. Bush, blunting the argument that political influences determine who fills the post.
Fouratt, 44, got the job in January 2008 when a panel of New Mexico federal judges, addressing a vacancy, determined a presidential appointment wasn’t imminent and exercised its authority to seat the position.

For Full Story

The Latest Government Screw Up in Sen. Ted Stevens’ Case Involving FBI Whistleblower

Sen. Ted Stevens/campaign photo

Sen. Ted Stevens/campaign photo

It’s hard to recall a high-profile case in recent years where the government has been involved in so many missteps. Here’s the latest one in the Stevens’ case.


By RICHARD MAUER
Anchorage Daily News

Federal prosecutors have found a new reason to apologize over misleading information they’ve provided to the judge in former Sen. Ted Stevens’ trial, and this time Stevens’ lawyers are saying the government should be held in contempt.
In a letter to the judge dated Jan. 30 and made public Thursday, William Welch, head of the Justice Department’s Public Integrity Section, said he erred when he said in January that government employees cited in an FBI agent’s complaint alleging improprieties by government officials “want their story to be made public.”
In fact, he wrote, not all of them gave their consent to having their names released Jan. 14 in a publicly filed copy of the eight-page complaint, though he didn’t identify which ones.
In the complaint, agent Chad Joy accused a fellow agent and prosecutors of violating FBI policy and fair-trial rules in the wide-ranging public corruption investigation in Alaska and in Stevens’ trial last year.
The new apology comes on top of a series of errors and misstatements made by prosecutors in connection with the complaint and other issues that arose during and after Stevens’ trial.
For Full Story