Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

January 2009
S M T W T F S
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Archive for January, 2009

FBI Agent Stephen Tidwell Who Worked on D.C. Sniper and 9/11 is Calling it Quits After 25 Years


After 25 years and investigations that have included the D.C. snipercase and the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, FBI agent J. Stephen Tidwell is calling it quits.

By LISA BEISEL
Annapolis Capitol

Crofton resident J. Stephen Tidwell has had an exciting career with the FBI since 1983.
He currently holds the bureau’s fourth-highest position, and during his career he led the investigation into Flight 77, the American Airlines flight that crashed into the Pentagon during the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. He also was in charge of the FBI’s October 2002 sniper investigation in Washington, D.C.
In 2004, he also was the on-scene commander for the FBI during the 2004 Athens Summer Olympics.
But all that FBI excitement will end for him this month, when he retires at age 56. It will likely be replaced by some Harley riding and golfing.

For Full Story

The Deadly Mexico Drug War Continues To Trigger Concern in U.S.

The raging drug war in Mexico is causing high anxiety in the U.S.

dea photo

dea photo

By Traci Carl
The Associated Press
MEXICO CITY – Indiscriminate kidnappings. Almost daily beheadings. Gangs that mock and kill government agents.
This isn’t Iraq or Pakistan. It’s Mexico, which the U.S. government and a growing number of analysts say is becoming one of the world’s biggest security risks.
The prospect that America’s southern neighbor could melt into lawlessness provides an unexpected challenge to Barack Obama’s new government. In its latest report anticipating possible global security risks, the U.S. Joint Forces Command lumps Mexico and Pakistan together as being at risk of a “rapid and sudden collapse.”
“The Mexican possibility may seem less likely, but the government, its politicians, police and judicial infrastructure are all under sustained assault and pressure by criminal gangs and drug cartels,” the command said in the report published Nov. 25.
For Full Story

Current ticklethewire.com Poll: Who has Been a Better FBI Director?

I invite more of you to vote on the current ticklethewire.com poll (to the right): Who has been the better director of the FBI?

Louis Freeh

Louis Freeh

Robert Mueller III

Robert Mueller

Louis Freeh or Robert Mueller III. The voting has been has been neck-and-neck. The poll will close on Friday at midnight.

Allan Lengel

editor/ticklethewire.com

Chicago Sun-Times Indentifies More Names in Document Charging Gov. Blagojevich

Like so many of the political corruption documents filed by U.S. Attorneys, this one is filled with words like “individuals” and “advisers”. The Chicago Sun-Times took the time to figure out who the individuals were behind those rather vague descriptions.

Gov. Blagojevich/gov. photo

Gov. Blagojevich/gov. photo

BY CHRIS FUSCO, NATASHA KORECKI, TIM NOVAK AND DAVE MCKINNEY
Chicago Sun-Times
CHICAGO — The Illinois Senate is poised to remove Gov. Blagojevich from office next month in the wake of the criminal charges that U.S. Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald announced Dec. 9.
The criminal complaint against the governor cites more than three dozen people, nine of whom have been charged with crimes. Only 15 of those people are identified by name, including the governor’s co-defendant, former chief of staff John Harris, and his former top fund-raisers and advisers, Chris Kelly and Tony Rezko, both now convicted of crimes.

ed it reveals wiretaps that prosecutors say show that the governor tried to sell the U.S. Senate seat once held by President-elect Barack Obama. He also allegedly threatened to kill a proposed deal to have the state provide financial assistance to Tribune Co. on a sale of Wrigley Field unless the Chicago Tribune fired certain editorial writers who had criticized him.

One Day to Go: Feds Ready for Inauguration Armed With High Tech Equipment

Federal authorities are seemingly prepared for the inauguration. But they know they can’t be prepared for everything. Whatever the case: One more day til showtime.

By Josh Meyer
Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON — As the multitudes arrive for the historic inauguration of Barack Obama, the most high-tech security bubble ever created is in place to protect the president-elect from any foreseeable act of nature or man.
But authorities say they still dread the “X factor” – intangibles that they cannot control and that could panic the huge crowd.
At the top of that list, they say, is the individual or small group who could slip through the intelligence and security net and fire a burst of gunfire or set off an explosion.
The chance of that is considered extremely unlikely. Law enforcement and intelligence officials say they have seen nothing to suggest the president-elect or his inauguration are being targeted.
Still, they say, no one can know for sure.
For Full Story

FEMA All a Twitter Over Twitter

Federal agencies are going to need to figure out all the cutting-edge ways to communicate to the public. Here’s the latest illustration that  it’s starting.

Chris Battle

Chris Battle

WASHINGTON —  On Monday, FEMA Administrator David Paulison participated in a citizens’ news conference on the social media Website Twitter.
And, yes, that’s the news. It was, I believe, an unprecedented step for a U.S. government agency. Sure, the Administrator had a message, which we’ll get to, but the very fact that Paulison is embracing social media tools speaks volumes about the positive direction of the agency in terms of public communication and transparency. For an organization that is responsible for coordinating action during times of crisis and for pro-actively communicating with the public about those actions, this is a heartening step.

Read more »

A Salute To MLK

“Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywherephoto/americaslibrary.gov

Martin Luther King, Jr.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbUtL_0vAJk

A Snapshot of the U.S. Border Patrol in Laredo, Texas