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Tag: spying

MassLive: Justice Department Is Wrong to Work with CIA on Spying on Americans

By MassLive
Editorial

If the CIA and the Justice Department were to get married, what kind of kids might the odd couple have?

One answer: Spies who’d believe that they possess the legal smarts to talk their way out of nearly anything.

When The Wall Street Journal reported late last year that the Justice Department was operating airplanes that flew across the land carrying devices mimicking cell towers scooping up details about the mobile phones of innocent citizens below – normal people who were accused of nothing, suspected of nothing, all in the name of tracking a few criminal suspects – we said in this space that the program was fundamentally anti-democratic. It was, plainly stated, un-American.

To have the authorities flying over the land and sweeping up information about the citizenry – even if it was in the name of locating a few bad actors – treated ordinary people like outlaws. We asked at the time – and we’ll ask again now – what becomes of the data that the Justice Department gathers? Who has access to it? How long is it retained?

Now comes a new report in the Journal detailing the CIA’s work with Justice. The U.S. Department of Justice is supposed to be working to enforce the law, not seeking to find novel ways to spy on the people. And our nation’s Central Intelligence Agency, established in 1947, was created to watch over the doings in foreign lands, not to aid Justice in spying on the American citizens.

To read more click here.

FBI’s Obsession with ‘Louie Louie’ Made the Song an Anthem for Rebellious Youths

 
By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The song “Louie Louie,” which turns 60 years this year, may not be as popular today if not for the FBI’s obsession with it during the 1960s.

The Tampa Tribune recalls the bureau’s countless hours spent trying to find something profane in the lyrics.

“Agents at the Tampa FBI office managed to find time in February 1964 to spend hours each day listening to a version of the song ‘Louie Louie’ recorded by the Portland, Oregon, band The Kingsmen,” the Tribune wrote.

“Looking back, it’s funny,” said Dick Peterson of The Kingsmen. “But the FBI was serious. They wanted to prove the song was dirty and they wanted to punish us for it. Even funnier of course is there was nothing dirty about it.”

When the public became aware of the FBI investigation,  people in the counter-culture made the song “an anthem in their protest against a controlling government.”

“There is no way the band would have been this big without that controversy,” Peterson said. “The song sounded horrible but the investigation turned it and our band into a huge success.”

 

FBI Busts Seller of Intrusive Cell Phone App That Spies on Users

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Want to spy on someone and have immediate access to their calls, texts and photos?

There’s an app for that – and the FBI has tracked down the maker.

The Daily Mail reports that the FBI shut down a website selling the “spyware” app and arrested a Pakistani national in Los Angeles for selling the technology.

The $59.99 app enabled people to intercept call in real time, while also giving them full access to the phone and its data.

The company says it sold more than 100,000 apps.

Andrew McCabe, assistant director of the Washington Field Office said: ‘This application allegedly equips potential stalkers and criminals with a means to invade an individual’s confidential communications.

‘They do this not by breaking into their homes or offices, but by physically installing spyware on unwitting victims’ phones and illegally tracking an individual’s every move.’

TSA Officer Charged After Being Accused of Secretly Videotaping Female Coworker in Restroom

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 A TSA officer is under fire after being accused of secretly videotaping a female coworker in an employee restroom at the Nashville International Airport, WJRN reports.

Daniel Boykin, 33, of Murfreesboro also is accused of entering the victim’s Nashville home several times to take information from her computers and electronic devices.

The investigation started after the victim said she saw images of herself on Boykin’s phone.

Investigators said Boykin appeared to be infatuated with the victim.

He is charged with aggravated burglary, wiretapping, unlawful photography, unlawful telephone recording and two computer crimes.

Boykin was arrested Monday and was lodged in jail on a $100,000 bond.

Other Stories of Interest


Former Israeli Ambassador: FBI Never Scolded Foreign Diplomats for Widespread Spying Since 9/11

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Trying to combat published reports that the FBI has scolded Israeli diplomats dozens of times for spying on American intelligence since 9/11, the former Israeli ambassador to the U.S. said the allegations were baseless.

The Jerusalem Post reported that the former ambassador, Michael Oren, insisted the relationship between the two countries has been solid and was never compromised by unfounded claims of rampant Israeli spying.

Newsweek magazine published reports last week that Israeli officials were frequently spying on the U.S. and were summoned by the FBI dozens of times to knock it off.

“Beginning in the mid-1990s, well after Israel promised to stop spying in the US in the wake of the Pollard affair, the FBI regularly felt compelled to summon Israeli diplomats in DC for a scolding, two former top counterintelligence officials told ‘Newsweek.’ During the decade following 9/11, one said, the Israelis were summoned ‘dozens’ of times and told to ‘cut the shit,’ as one, a former top FBI official, put it. But as an ‘ally,’ the Israelis almost always got off with only a warning.”

Burglars Behind 1971 Break-In at FBI Office in Philadelphia Tell All

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

While many Americans were watching a televised title bout between Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier nearly 23 years, antiwar activists were breaking into the FBI office in Philadelphia and stealing confidential documents.

What happened that day was largely unknown until the author of a new book convinced five of the eight burglars to detail what happened, the New York Times reports.

The men and women, who can no longer be prosecuted, said they were motivated by the desire to expose the agency for using dirty tricks to spy on dissident groups.

They sent many of the records to newspaper reporters, unveiling widespread, extensive spying.

“When you talked to people outside the movement about what the F.B.I. was doing, nobody wanted to believe it,” said one of the burglars, Keith Forsyth. “There was only one way to convince people that it was true, and that was to get it in their handwriting.”

The new book is called “The Burglary: The Discovery of J. Edgar Hoover’s Secret FBI.”

Anger Over NSA Surveillance Could Lead to Broad Changes in Intelligence Gathering

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Is the intelligence community on the verge of a major shakeup?

Maybe so, the USA Today reports.

As public pressure builds against the NSA over more revelations over international and domestic spying, lawmakers are considering major overhauls.

“It is time for serious and meaningful reforms so we can restore confidence in our intelligence community,” said Sen. Patrick Leahy, a Vermont Democrat and chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee this week. “Modest transparency and oversight provisions are not enough. We need real reform.”

Lawmakers Propose Changes To Close Gap When Terror Suspect Enters U.S.

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Lawmakers are trying to expand the surveillance powers of intelligence agencies to make spying more seamless when a terror suspect enters the U.S., the Associated Press reports.

The idea is to close the gap between NSA and FBI electronic surveillance, which occurs because of different legal standards between the two agencies.

That gap poses challenges in keeping surveillance uninterrupted as suspects enter the U.S.

The AP reports:

The chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., told The Associated Press that her committee is drafting a bill that would amend the law’s Section 702 provision, which authorizes targeting non-Americans outside the U.S., to allow uninterrupted spying on a suspect for “a limited period of time after the NSA learns the target has traveled to the United States, so the government may obtain a court order based on probable cause.”

 

The proposed changes will include testimony from top intelligence officials.