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Tag: gangsters

Jimmy Hoffa: On the 40th Anniversary of His Disappearance, the Case Goes Unsolved

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Jimmy Hoffa

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

DETROIT — I remember back in 1983 interviewing Jimmy P. Hoffa about his father’s disappearance and asking if it bothered him that comedians like Johnny Carson used his father as a punch line in jokes.

Eight years had passed since his disappearance, but time didn’t seem to soften the blow. Hoffa, who was 42 at the time and a labor attorney,  said in no uncertain terms that it did bother him and he didn’t appreciate it one bit. He also wanted to know what really happened. To this day, no one has ever been charged.

Today marks the 40 year anniversary of the disappearance of James Riddle Hoffa, who would now be 102.

Hoffa, who is now the president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, declined to comment on Thursday on the anniversary.

Instead, the union issued a press release that said:

Hoffa was devoted to his union and to his family. He gave his life while fighting to remove corrupt elements from the union and return power to the members.

On this tragic anniversary, Teamster members and retirees from across North America join together in honoring the man who forever improved the lives of millions of workers and their families.

On July 30, 1975, he was supposed to meet two gangsters — Anthony “Tony Pro” Provenzano  of New Jersey and Anthony “Tony Jack” Giacalone of the Detroit area — at the Machus Red Fox on Telegraph Road in Bloomfield Township. They didn’t show and he reportedly got into someone’s car in the parking lot and was never seen again.

Theories abound. Over the years, properties have been dug up on the hunch that the body was buried there.

Some gangsters who likely knew what happened are dead including Giacalone and Provenzano. And the Machus Red Fox is gone as well.

WDIV’s Kevin Dietz reports on the anniversary. He  goes over some of the theories, reports on the embarrassing FBI digs and talks to Scott Burnstein, a Detroit area reporter who specializes in organized crime.

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FBI Busts Menacing Trio in Loan-Sharking Ring in Brooklyn

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An unlikely alliance between gangsters and the mafia was discovered by the FBI during an investigation of a loan-sharking ring, the New York Post reports.

The newspaper wrote that the Brooklyn-based FBI arrested purported Gambino crime family member James Ferrara, alleged Westies gang member Daniel Hanley and reputed Demon Knights motorcycle gangster Peter Kanakis.

The FBI says the trifecta were running a menacing, illegal outfit.

“Allegedly members of three different organized crime enterprises, these defendants nevertheless banded together and spoke the same language of violence, threats and intimidation to their victims. Such tactics will always be met with the full force of the law,” US Attorney Loretta Lynch said.

STORIES OF OTHER INTEREST

A Big Goof By the Feds Resulted in Mobster’s Murder, Gang Land News Reports


By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A goof by federal law enforcement resulted in the murder of Genovese family mobster Adolfo (Big Al) Bruno in 2003, Gang Land News reports.

The website on the Mafia reported that a federal probation officer mentioned in a pre-sentence report to a Massachusetts federal judge that Bruno, who ran the Springfield, Mass. rackets for the crime family,  had cooperated with the FBI. The pre-sentence report was for mobster Emilio Fusco.

When Fusco,  who is entitled to see the report, read the passage about Bruno snitching, he told other mobsters, Gang Land reported. Eventually, then-acting mob boss Arthur (The Little Guy) Nigro put a hit out on Bruno, one mobster testified in court.

The information about the pre-sentence report surfaced in an a federal trial for  Nigro and two associates,  Fotios Geas and Ty Geas. All three were convicted Friday in U.S. District Court in Manhattan in Bruno’s murder and other crimes.

Gang Land quoted a former fed prosecutor as saying: “Obviously, Bruno’s name should not have been in the (pre-sentence report) as the source of the information. It’s like putting a bulls-eye on the guy’s chest.”

Gang Land reported that another former law enforcement source said: “To me, it looks like everyone messed up. The agent shouldn’t have given Bruno’s name to the prosecutor; the prosecutor shouldn’t have repeated it to the probation department, and the probation officer shouldn’t have included it in his report.”

Gangland reported that the FBI declined comment.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Column: We Must Stop Glamourizing Mobsters

William Donati is an English professor at the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) and author of the just-released book: “Lucky Luciano: The Rise and Fall of a Mob Boss”

lucky luciano and bookBy William Donati
For ticklethewire.com

LAS VEGAS –– Hollywood was criticized in the thirties for films like Public Enemy and Little Caesar: Gangsters were portrayed too sympathetically complained citizens.

In modern times, we have the Godfather, Goodfellas, Scarface, and the Sopranos offered as popular entertainment. Motion pictures reflect cultural values. The recent film Dillinger was criticized for its moral ambiguity. The cops are just as rotten as the crooks. Is that true?

Do citizens believe that? If so, society is in deep trouble.

Of course, the real heroes are the police and prosecutors. Film audiences do not feel the actual pain criminals inflict as killers, extortionists, thieves, and drug dealers.

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