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Tag: Eliot Spitzer

Number 2 at NY U.S. Atty. Office Leaving; Was Once Considered to Lead DEA

Boyd Johnson III/doj photo

 
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Boyd M. Johnson III, the Manhattan U.S. Attorney’s number 2 person, whose name had surfaced in 2009 as a contender to fill DEA’s top spot, is leaving government to join a private law firm, Globe Newswire reported.

Johnson plans to join the firm of WilmerHale in New York as a partner.

The New York Times reports that he will be replaced by Richard B. Zabel, who has run the office’s criminal division over the past two years.

Johnson, who had served in the number two spot since U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara was appointed in 2009. He has overseen a number of major criminal prosecutions including the Bernie Madoff and Eliot Spitzer cases.

In 2009, his name was among of handful of candidates being mentioned for the director spot at DEA. The White House eventually went with Michele Leonhart, who had been the acting director for years.

 

Court Denies NY Times Access to Wiretap Document for Prostitution Ring Patronized by Eliot Spitzer

Let’s forget the legal arguments here. For entertainment sake, how can the court deprive the public the pleasure of seeing these sizzling documents?

Ex-Gov. Eliot Spitzer

Ex-Gov. Eliot Spitzer

By ANNIE YOUDERIAN
Courthouse News Service

The New York Times has not shown “good cause” to unseal wiretap applications in the investigation of a prostitution ring once patronized by former New York Gov. Eliot Spitzer, the 2nd Circuit ruled Friday.

A three-judge panel in Manhattan overturned U.S. District Judge Jed Rakoff’s order granting the Times access to sealed wiretap applications and orders in the Emperors Club investigation
.
The 2nd Circuit also held that the newspaper does not have a First Amendment right to view the requested documents.

For Full Story

Ex-Gov Eliot Spitzer Met Regularly With Hookers For 18 Months Before He Resigned

From Emperors Club
Emperors Club

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Eliot Spitzer — or “Client 9″ as he’s known in some ledger books — is back in the news again.

A lawyer for an ex-worker at the infamous Emperors Club V.I.P. said outside a federal courtroom Monday that his client revealed that Spitzer met regularly with hookers for 18 months before his political demise, the Associated Press reported

Attorney Marc Agnifilo made the comments after his client Temeka Lewis was sentenced to a year of probation, the AP reported.

Lewis pleaded guilty in May 2008 to conspiracy charges. The FBI investigated Spitzer and even surveilled him in Washington, but never charged him.

In a press release, the U.S. Attorney’s Office said  Lewis ” arranged over the phone in January 2008 for a prostitute to meet a man at a hotel in New York, New York, and on another occasion, for a prostitute to travel from New York to Washington, D.C. to meet a man in his hotel room.”

Read Press Release

Feds to Fight Judge’s Order to Release Documents in Eliot Spitzer Probe

Ex-Gov. Eliot Spitzer

Ex-Gov. Eliot Spitzer

Ok. There’s two levels of interest when it comes to these documents. One level: Did the government have justification to go as far as it did to get wiretaps and follow Eliot Spitzer to the landmark hotel, the Mayflower, in Washington? The second level is purely fodder for the tabloids: Juicy details of the underground life of a high profile and sometimes abrasive politician who had a promising future in the Democratic party.

By William K. Rashbaum
New York Times
NEW YORK – Prosecutors of the prostitution case that exposed Eliot Spitzer as a client while he was governor are appealing a court order directing them to unseal records that may shed light on the origins of the investigation. The case led to Mr. Spitzer’s resignation as governor of New York in March 2008.

The Feb. 19 ruling by Jed S. Rakoff of United States District Court in Manhattan ordered the federal prosecutors to provide the records – including sworn affidavits that were part of wiretap applications in the case – to The New York Times, which in December filed a motion to unseal the material.

The prosecutors, from the United States attorney’s office in Manhattan, filed a notice in court on Monday saying that they would appeal Judge Rakoff’s ruling to the United States Circuit Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, a decision that was made by senior Justice Department officials in Washington.

For Full Story

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Now This Should Be Interesting: Judge Orders Feds to Release Documents in Eliot Spitzer Probe

Eliot Spitzer

Eliot Spitzer

The documents should give us some interesting insights into Eliot Spitzer  and the FBI investigation. Some say the probe was politically motivated and the feds wouldn’t have normally gone so far in a prostitution case. Others say there was enough suspicion of possible corruption to carry out the probe. Documents should be released next week.

By William K. Rashbaum
New York Times

A federal judge on Thursday ordered the federal prosecutors whose investigation exposed former Gov. Eliot Spitzer’s involvement with a prostitute to unseal court records that may shed some light on the origins of the case that led to his resignation in March 2008.

The judge, Jed S. Rakoff of Federal District Court in Manhattan, ordered federal prosecutors to provide the records – sworn affidavits that were part of wiretap applications in the case – to The New York Times, which in December filed a motion to have the material unsealed.

Prosecutors argued that the documents should not be released, citing the privacy concerns of the more than 60 apparent clients of the prostitution ring who were intercepted and the need for confidentiality of law enforcement investigations.

But The Times agreed to the redaction of the names of the apparent clients and Judge Rakoff said that there was no longer a need for confidentiality concerning the investigation, which has concluded with charges against four people involved in the ring. Mr. Spitzer was never charged with a crime.

The judge, in ruling for the newspaper, wrote that “there is obvious interest in obtaining information about the origins of an investigation that led, ultimately, to the resignation of the governor of New York.”

For Full Story