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Tag: DEA

San Diego Union-Tribune: Advocates of Marijuana Legalization Miss Mark

marijuana-istockBy David W. Murray & John P. Walters
The San Diego Union-Tribune

A recent example of the logical abandon of today’s backers of legal marijuana is the plan to defund the Drug Enforcement Administration’s program to eradicate illegal marijuana (DEA/CESP), an $18 million program that eliminates millions of plants a year and arrests thousands of criminals, many of whom were brought here to labor for Mexican drug cartels controlling the marijuana black market.

Yet Congressman Ted Lieu (D-CA) wants to end the effort as a “ridiculous waste” of federal resources, when multiple states “have already legalized marijuana,” use of which should “no longer be a federal crime.” Clearly, the congressman has not thought this through. He is, in fact, arguing against his own legal marijuana case.

A central tenet of the legalization movement is that criminal marijuana was to be supplanted by “safe, regulated and taxed” marijuana under careful control. It is a contradiction of that principle to foster, by cutting the DEA program, the proliferation of unregulated, untaxed and “unsafe” marijuana plants controlled by violent criminals, thereby corrupting the entire point of a “legalized” marijuana market.

While a “regulated and taxed market” was the position sold to legislators, the real objective seems to be a dope-growing paradise, unregulated and unopposed. Congressman Lieu doesn’t even try to explain how this is supposed to advance America’s well-being.

For years now, Americans have been subjected to efforts by advocates for legalized marijuana to make their case. Today, the arguments often come from legalization lobbyists, often with legal or political training, seeking to legitimize what they hope will become a billion-dollar business in addictive toxins – repeat customers guaranteed.

Or consider the argument that marijuana is “safer to use” than alcohol. That alcohol is dangerous all acknowledge, costing the health of thousands. But the proper argument is that each intoxicant presents its own unique threats. It is not productive medically to “rank” them. But what is the logical implication of the alcohol talking point?

The regulation of alcohol is precisely the idealized model that lobbyists put forth for legal drugs. Hence, every time they insist that alcohol is the more damaging substance, what they are actually showing is that the model of legal, regulated sales of addictive substances produces widespread harm to adults and adolescents.

To read more click here. 

 

DEA Gets New Leader of Philadelphia Field Division; Pledges Fight Against Heroin

Gary Tuggle

Gary Tuggle

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A 23-year veteran of the DEA has been named as the next head of the Philadelphia Field Division.

Philly.com reports that Gary Tuggle will oversee the city and five regional officers in Pennsylvania and Delaware, replacing Don Dongilli, who retired last year.

Tuggle’s career began as a Baltimore City police officer before joining the DEA in 1992.

Most recently, Tuggle served as the assistant special agent in charge of the DEA’s Washington Office.

Tuggle said he plans to focus on the heroin and prescription drug epidemic.

Other Stories of Interest

New DEA Chief: Marijuana ‘Probably Not’ As Dangerous As Heroin

Marijuana

Photo by Steve Neavling

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The new head of the DEA says marijuana is “probably not” as dangerous as heroin, a position that was in contrast to his predecessor, the U.S. News & World Report. 

Acting Administrator Chuck Rosenberg said the DEA would not prioritize marijuana enforcement, but emphasized that agents are still going to pursue pot cases.

“If you want me to say that marijuana’s not dangerous, I’m not going to say that because I think it is,” Rosenberg said. “Do I think it’s as dangerous as heroin? Probably not. I’m not an expert.”

He added: “Let me say it this way: I’d rather be in a car accident going 30 miles an hour than 60 miles an hour, but I’d prefer not to be in a car accident at all.”

Marijuana advocates praised Rosenberg for being less aggressive with marijuana than his predecessor, Michele Leonhart.

“This is not a matter of opinion,” Dan Riffle, director of federal policies at the pro-legalization Marijuana Policy Project, says. “It’s far less harmful than heroin and it’s encouraging that the DEA is finally willing to recognize that.”

Other Stories of Interest

DEA Confident That Escaped Drug Lord Joaquin Guzman Will Be Captured

guzmanBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

The DEA is saying it’s confident that escaped Mexican drug loan Joaquin Guzman will be captured.

“I haven’t slept since Saturday night,” U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration deputy administrator Jack Riley said, according to a report by John Bacon in USA Today. “The hunt is back on – and we are going to get him.”

But Riley said he believes Guzman will remain in Mexico, returning to his roots in the rural Sinaloa Mountains of western Mexico, USA Today reports.

“My sense is that he’s a creature of habit,” Riley said. “I don’t have any information to suggest it, but I would guess that he would retreat to Sinaloa.”

DEA Warned Mexico of Plot to Help Drug Lord ‘El Chapo’ Escape Prison

'El Chapo' Guzman

Joaquin ‘El Chapo’ Guzman

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA warned Mexico 16 months ago of plans by drug lord Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman to break out of prison, according to documents revealed Monday, Fox News reports. 

The U.S. first warned Mexico in March 2014 that information has been gathered to suggest family members and others in the drug world planned “potential operations to free Guzman.”

Mexican officials denied being informed “in that respect” and questioned the authenticity of the documents.

Guzman broke out of prison before and was captured in February 2014, when plans almost immediately began to hatch to help him break free of jail.

Other Stories of Interest

DEA Head: 43,000 People Die a Year from Opiate Overdoses

Liquid Meth Is No. 1 Drug Crossing Border Because of Cheaper Ingredients

dea-badgeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Forget marijuana and cocaine.

The No. 1 drug entering the U.S. from the Southwest border is liquid methamphetamine, KSAT.com reports. 

“The Mexican cartels have figured out a very effective way to massively produce very low cost, inexpensive methamphetamine year-round,” said Wendell Campbell, spokesperson for the DEA’s Houston division.

One reason it has become so popular is the price, which has dropped from $21,000 per kilo in 2010 to $10,000 last year.

In just the past few years, the DEA has witnessed a 350% increase in seizures.

Some of the chemical ingredients come from China.

The substance is mixed with gas or acetone and heated over an open fire to make it crystallize.

Stories of Other Interest

DEA, FBI Accused of Long Relationship with Controversial Italian Firm for Surveillance

Data securityBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An Italian company with suspected ties to repressive regimes has been selling surveillance and spyware to the FBI and DEA, The Hill reports. 

The discovery comes after the firm, Hacking Team, was hacked. The hacker revealed company documents that suggest countries the company does business with countries like Sudan.

Among the discoveries was a multi-year relationship with the FBI and DEA.

“The more I read, the more I think the term ‘merchants of death’ accurately applies to @HackingTeam,” tweeted Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).

The company also has been accused of selling its surveillance to help governments monitor and surprises journalists and political opponents.