bestusacasinos.org rated online casino south africa best online blackjack usa players united states casino slots new us online casinos all new video slots online blackjack bonus UseMyBank and online casinos instant play casino for us players slot machines games best paying casino games 2014 bonus guide best online slots site casino forum best online casino slots us player blackjack casino real money play casino slot machine online


Get Our Newsletter


Twitter Widgets



Links

Columnists





Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

March 2015
S M T W T F S
« Feb    
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: DEA

All 9 Former DEA Administrators Join Forces to Oppose Legalization of Pot in Colorado

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

All nine of the DEA’s former administrators signed an amicus brief that was filed Thursday in support of a Supreme Court petition challenging Colorado’s recreational marijuana laws, Politico reports.

The directors are siding with Oklahoma and Nebraska’s Supreme Court petition that challenges legalization.

The law in Colorado “gravely menace[s]…[t]he health, comfort and prosperity of the people” of neighboring states,” the former administrators write in their brief.

“The federal government made the choice in 1970 that a uniform, comprehensive, and consistent national approach to controlled substances was necessary,” the brief continues. “Principles of federalism, properly understood, therefore support the plaintiff States’ suit against Colorado.”

President Obama’s administration has urged federal law enforcement to respect state marijuana laws.

Other Stories of Interest

 

Army Sniper Pleads Guilty to Conspiring to Murder DEA Agent, Informant

Sniper rifle

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A former U.S. Army sniper has pleaded guilty to conspiring to murder a DEA agent and an informant.

Joseph Hunter, 49, and five others were arrested in September 2013 after they were recorded plotting to kill a DEA agent and informant in Liberia for $800,000, International Business Times reports.

Hunter was snared in a sting operation in which he thought he was working for a Columbian drug cartel.

Hunter faces between 10 years and life in prison when he is sentenced in May.

He also pleaded guilty to firearms charges and conspiring to import cocaine into the U.S.

Other Stories of Interest


Is Law Enforcement Crossing Line by Taking Photos of Drivers, Passengers?

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A license-plate scanning system designed to combat drug trafficking and other crimes has raised serious privacy questions because of the technology’s ability to snap photographs of drivers and their passengers, the ACLU said, reports Bloomberg.

The concern is that authorities will combine the photographs with facial-recognition software.

“This adds a whole other dimension to what is already a very significant surveillance infrastructure,” Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst for the ACLU, said in an interview. “Facial recognition software holds the potential to super charge this kind of system. We haven’t seen anything like a nationwide systematic infrastructure snapping photographs of Americans as they go about their lives, and this is what this appears it can turn into.”

Records obtained by the ACLU found that the license-plate database had more than 343 million records.

“An automatic license plate reader cannot distinguish between people transporting illegal guns and those transporting legal guns, or no guns at all; it only documents the presence of any car driving to the event,” the ACLU said in a blog post last month. “Mere attendance at a gun show, it appeared, would have been enough to have one’s presence noted in a DEA database.”

Other Stories of Interest


Justice Department Builds Secret Database to Spy on Millions of Cars

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A license plate tracking program established to seize cars and money to combat drug trafficking has gone far beyond its original scope and has led to the collection and storage of millions of records about motorists, Reuters reports.

Not only is the database being used to track drug dealers, but state and locals authorities are using it to search for cars tied to other serious crimes, raising questions among privacy advocates.

This is the first time the DEA has revealed it is expanding its database beyond the  Mexican border.

What remained unknown was whether a judge or agency was responsible for oversight.

A debate is being waged in Washington over what some are expressing as privacy concerns with license plate readers.

Are Drones the Drug Mules of the Future? DEA Says It’s Not Cost-Effective

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The recent discovery of a drone carrying methamphetamine near the U.S. border in Mexico has raised some eyebrows.

But the DEA said drones will not become tomorrow’s drug mules because they are not cost-effective, the Los Angeles Times reports.

“This method will only allow a small amount of drugs to be flown at a time, and that coupled with the ease of detection, does not make this method very profitable to these drug trafficking organizations whose motivation is money,” DEA spokeswoman Amy Roderick said.

It wasn’t immediately clear where the recent drone was heading, though one media report suggested the unmanned aircraft system was carrying drugs from one Tijuana neighborhood to another.

“While we would not call using drones a new trend in smuggling, we do know that drug trafficking organizations will use any and all means to get their drugs in the United States,” said Roderick.

The FBI and Drugs in the Beginning

Cocaine/ticklethewire.com file photo

By Greg Stejskal
ticklethewire.com

Webster Bivens may have been a drug dealer, but his place in law enforcement history is not proportional to his status as an alleged dealer.

In the fall of 1965, Federal Bureau of Narcotics agents raided Bivens’ Brooklyn apartment. The FBN agents had neither an arrest warrant nor a search warrant. The agents arrested Bivens and handcuffed him in front of his family. They also allegedly threatened his family and in the terminology of Bivens’ later law suit searched his apartment from “stem to stern.” No drugs were found, and the charges filed after Bivens’ arrest were dismissed.

Bivens apparently had a litigious streak and brought a civil action against the “six unknown agents” of the FBN based on the violation of his rights under the 4th Amendment: “The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the person or things to be seized.”

Up until that time, a cause of action could not be brought against the US or its agents except as specifically authorized under certain statutes, and that was the ruling of the lower courts in Bivens’ action. But the Bivens case made it to the US Supreme Court, and in 1971, the Court decided that the US could be sued if the acts of its agents violated the Constitutional rights of a person. This not only created a cause of action, it fostered a perception that federal drug agents were running amok and were incapable of doing more than simple “buy-bust” investigations.

As the Bivens case worked its way through the courts, the whole approach to the federal war on drugs was being evaluated. The FBN agents who arrested Bivens were part of the Department of the Treasury. Presumably because drugs like alcohol were viewed as taxable commodities even though the principal drugs being targeted at that time were heroin, cocaine and marijuana, and were illegal per se.

Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs Was Created

In order to unify the federal effort against illegal drugs, one agency was created in 1968, the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs (BNDD), and it would now be an investigative agency in the Department of Justice. Then in 1973 the BNDD was renamed the Drug Enforcement Administration, and it remained in the DOJ. Although the perception of drug agents out of control was mostly inaccurate, DEA did have limited resources and was under pressure to produce results in terms of arrests and drug seizures. This made it difficult to dedicate their limited resources to long-term investigations targeting the upper echelons of drug trafficking organizations.

In the meantime the FBI was learning to utilize tools provided by the Omnibus Crime Act of 1968. This lengthy act was intended to provide means for federal law enforcement to investigate organized crime. For the FBI that meant La Costa Nostra, the Mafia. One particular part of the act (Title III) prescribed the process to legally intercept wire, oral or electronic communications – electronic surveillance or elsur for short. It included telephone wiretaps and surreptitiously placed microphones or bugs – generally referred to as a “wire.”

The probable cause required to get judicial approval for elsur was by design a difficult standard to meet. The affidavit documenting this “special “ probable cause often ran well in excess of 100 pages. Among other things, there had to be a showing that other investigative techniques wouldn’t work. For example if a drug dealer would only deal with someone he has known for years, it would be very difficult to get him to deal with an undercover agent.

Once the affidavit & accompanying order are written, they have to be submitted to the Attorney General of the US or a specifically designated Assistant AG for approval. If they are approved, they then have to be authorized by a US District Court Judge in the district where the elsur is to be conducted. The elsurs are limited to 30 days, but can be renewed based on an updated affidavit.

Read more »

DEA’s #2 Person, Thomas Harrigan, Retires to Join the Private Sector

Thomas Harrigan/dea photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Thomas M. Harrigan, DEA’s number two person who was confirmed by the Senate as deputy administrator in March 2012, has retired from the agency to join the private sector.

Harrigan stepped down at the end of December.

Harrigan joined the DEA in 1987 and was first assigned to the New York Division.

Joseph Moses, a special agent and spokesman for DEA, said Wednesday that no replacement has been named as of yet.

Harrigan has joined CACI, a company based in Arlington, Va., that describes itself as providing “information solutions and services in support of national security missions and government transformation for Intelligence, Defense, and Federal Civilian customers.”

DEA Investigator Received Sexual Favors in Exchange for Bogus Offers of Reduced Sentences

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Federal methamphetamine cases against 11 people may be in limbo after a DEA investigator in Roanoke, Va., admitted he received sexual favors in exchange for bogus offers of reduced sentences, WDBJ 7 reports

Kevin Moore admitted the offenses two weeks ago, and now many of the cases have been delayed to determine how to proceed next.

Some of the defendants were awaiting sentencing, while ethers were headed to a jury trial next year.

So far, investigators said they don’t have any evidence that Moore mishandled the 11 cases.

Other Stories of Interest