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Tag: david patraeus

Judge: Jill Kelly May Press Forward with Lawsuit Against FBI Over Invasion of Privacy

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Jill Kelley may continue pursuing her lawsuit against the FBI over the scandal involving former CIA Director David Patraeus, a judge ruled Monday.

The New York Daily News reports that U.S. District Judge Amy Berman declined to dismiss a case by Kelly, who claims the FBI and Justice Department violated her privacy by leaking personal information about her to the media.

The case came to light when Kelly told the FBI in 2012 that she had been receiving harassing emails, which turned out to be from Paula Broadwell, who was having an affair with Patraeus.

Soon after, the news media obtained personal information about Kelley.

The judge’s decision, however, does not touch the merits of the case.

 

Boston Globe Editorial: FBI Found Right Balance in Probe of CIA Director Petraeus

By Boston Globe
Editorial
 

What, exactly, would critics want the FBI to have done differently? The agency is coming in for a lot of second-guessing in Congress for its handling of the inquiry into the extramarital affair between former CIA director David H. Petraeus and biographer Paula Broadwell. The bizarre case, involving anonymous e-mails, catty rivalries on the Tampa social scene, and a cast of deeply immature people, has no immediate precedent. Although the facts are still coming out, it seems the Department of Justice handled the investigation about as well as it could have.

To some, the agency never should have gotten involved at all. Sex between consenting adults is legal, romantic rivalries are none of law enforcement’s business, and FBI snooping into private affairs creates an uncomfortable echo of the abuses of the J. Edgar Hoover era. The questionable role played by an FBI agent who had sent a shirtless photo to a woman involved in the case only makes the agency’s involvement more awkward. Still, when the FBI became aware of a prominent national security figure involved in secretive escapades, it had an obligation to ensure that no sensitive information was compromised.

To read more click here.

 

David Petraeus Investigation Expands to Top US Commander in Afganistan

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The ever-evolving investigation into CIA Director David Petraeus’ extramarital affair has expanded to the top U.S. commander in Afghanistan, General John Allen, who is accused of inappropriate communication with the woman at the center of the scandal, Reuters reports.

The FBI uncovered up to 30,000 pages of communication, mostly e-mails, between Allen and Jill Kelley, who is a family friend of Petraeus and the impetus of the investigation.

The nature of the communication is unclear.

Asked whether it included classified information, a senior U.S. Defense official would only say, “”We are concerned about inappropriate communications. We are not going to speculate as to what is contained in these documents.”

The Defense Department’s Inspector General is investigating.

Patraeus Email Scandal Grows Richer: FBI Agent Sent Shirtless Photo to Woman Who Complained

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Now this is starting to sound like a full-blown, made for the big-screen Washington scandal.

Reporters Devlin Barrett, Evan Perez and Siobhan Gorman of the Wall Street Journal report that the FBI agent who started the probe into Patraeus scandal, was a friend of Jill Kelley, the Tampa woman who received harassing, anonymous emails, and sent her a shirtless photo of himself before the whole probe began.

The Journal reported:

 However, supervisors soon became concerned that the initial agent might have grown obsessed with the matter, and prohibited him from any role in the investigation, according to the officials.

One official said the agent in question sent shirtless photos to Ms. Kelley well before the email investigation began, and FBI officials only became aware of them some time later. Eventually, supervisors told the agent he was to have nothing to do with the case, though he never had a formal role in the investigation, the official said.

To read the full story click here.

Column: Ex-Fed Prosecutor Says Prosecutors in Petraeus Case Exercised “Sound Discretion”

Steve Levin, a criminal defense attorney, spent ten years as a federal prosecutor in North Carolina and Maryland. He served on active duty in the United States Army as a defense counsel, an appellate attorney, and a trial attorney, and is now a military judge in the Army Reserve. His firm, Levin & Curlett, has offices  in Baltimore and Washington.  This column  first appeared on his blog Fraud with Peril.

Steve Levin

 
By Steve Levin
For ticklethewire.com

In 2004, the then-US Attorney for the District of Maryland famously wrote in a leaked email that he wanted three front-page indictments by November of that year. Though open to interpretation, the impression left by the poorly-drafted missive is that prosecutors should seek headlines rather than justice.

Let’s give credit to the prosecutors involved in the Petraeus/ Broadwell affair, er, matter for their exercise of sound discretion.

Assuming the accuracy of the news reports, Paula Broadwell potentially subjected herself to indictment for any number of federal crimes. In his paper entitled Computer and Internet Crime, G. Patrick Black, a federal defender in Texas, analyzes a number of cyberstalking statutes. As Black writes:

Under 18 U.S.C. 875(c), it is a federal crime to transmit any communication in interstate or foreign commerce containing a threat to injure the person of another. Section 875(c) applies to any communication actually transmitted in interstate or foreign commerce – thus it includes threats transmitted in interstate or foreign commerce via the telephone, e-mail, beepers, or the Internet. Title 18 U.S.C. 875 is not an all-purpose anti-cyberstalking statute.

First, it applies only to communications of actual threats. Thus, it would not apply in a situation where a cyberstalker engaged in a pattern of conduct intended to harass or annoy another (absent some threat). Also, it is not clear that it would apply to situations where a person harasses or terrorizes another by posting messages on a bulletin board or in a chat room encouraging others to harass or annoy another person.

Read more »

Column: Ex-FBI Official Skeptical of Media and Whether Patraeus Probe Will Remain Bi-Partisan

Anthony Riggio is a former lawyer who went on to work for the FBI for 24 years. He held a number of posts during that time including assistant special agent in charge of the Detroit office. He retired in 1995 as a senior executive at FBI headquarters. His column is in response to a ticklethewire.com newsletter that said: “It will be interesting to see how much legs this Gen. Patraeus scandal has. Hopefully, it will remain a bi-partisan concern. If not, it will just turn into another ugly partisan-bashing fest inside the Beltway, something the country doesn’t need.“ 

Tony Riggio

By Anthony Riggio
For ticklethewire.com
I am afraid that if the media doesn’t keep it alive it may never develop “legs”.
 
Based on past performance, vis a vie this president, I have little faith in our media. This, in my humble opinion is perhaps bigger than Watergate because of all the players involved. But unlike Nixon, Obama is not a Republican.

So I ask:  Do all the people have a “right to know” or do only the “liberal half”?

As far as bi-partisanship goes, I, for one, am not holding my breath.

If the media, in this situation, does not do its job, the Congress will!  Still, I fear that a biased media will regard any legitimate inquiries as  ”partisan bashing.”